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Dear Friends

Osteoporosis on the Rise: What’s missing?

10 million Americans have osteoporosis; and the numbers are predicted to reach 14 million by 2020 (Burge, 2007).

What is missing in our diets and supplementation to have such an increase in the number of people suffering with osteoporosis?

Many studies show that it is our lack of adequate intake of polyphenols from fruits and vegetables, green teas, and some seeds. Berry polyphenols are found to reduce the risk of age related bone loss.

In fact, Hubert et al. (2014) find a positive association of high berry intake and higher bone mass. The researchers recommend the addition of berries to supplement our daily diet.

Their meta-analysis study, Dietary Polyphenols, Berries, and Age Related Bone Loss: A Review Based on Human, Animal and Cell Studies, evaluated human and animal studies and found strong associations between polyphenol intake, reduced fracture risk, increased bone formation markers, and increased BMD (Hubert et al., 2014). For similar studies, see also Welsh, 2012; Hardcastel, 2011; Hooshmand, 2011; Langsetmo, 2011; Arjmandi, 2010; Burge, 2007; Garrett, 1990.

A protocol for added phenols and boron:

Food Science

Strengthen your phenol dietary intake with our High ORAC Synbiotic Formula. The High ORAC includes a collection of berries and fruits with their extracts. High ORAC contains two strong probiotic organisms which in research are shown to tighten the cell junctions in the gut, reducing gut generated chronic inflammation (Ulluwishewa et al., 2011). Chronic inflammation is shown to cause an increase in osteoclast activity resulting in the de-mineralization of the bone (Weitzmann, 2013; Garrett et al., 1990).

Add Fructo Borate Complex to the phenolic and probiotic rich High ORAC to create a highly effective protocol. The Fructo Borate contains carbohydrate bound boron as found in nature. It is highly absorbable and instrumental in enhanving the re-mineralization of the bone (Miljkovic et al., 2004).

Bibliography

  • Arjmandi, B.H.; Johnson, C.D.; Campbell, S.C.; Hooshmand, S.; Chai, S.C.; Akhter, M.P. (2010). Combining fructooligosaccharide and dried plum has the greatest effect on restoring bone mineral density among select functional foods and bioactive compounds. J. Med. Food; 13: 312–319.
  • Burge, R.; Dawson-Hughes, B.; Solomon, D.H.; Wong, J.B.; King, A.; Tosteson, A. (2007). Incidence and economic burden of osteoporosis-related fractures in the United States, 2005–2025. J. Bone Miner. Res.22: 465–475.
  • Garrett, I.R.; Boyce, B.F.; Oreffo, R.O.; Bonewald, L.; Poser, J.; Mundy, G.R. (1990). Oxygen-derived free radicals stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in rodent bone in vitro and in vivoJ. Clin. Investig; 85: 632–639.
  • Hardcastle, A.C.; Aucott, L.; Reid, D.M.; Macdonald, H.M. (2011). Associations between dietary flavonoid intakes and bone health in a Scottish population. J. Bone Miner. Res: 26: 941–947.
  • Hooshmand, S.; Chai, S.C.; Saadat, R.L.; Payton, M.E.; Brummel-Smith, K.; Arjmandi, B.H. (2011). Comparative effects of dried plum and dried apple on bone in postmenopausal women. Br. J. Nutr; 106: 923–930
  • Hubert, P.A.; Lee, G.L.; Lee, S.K.; Chun, O.K. (2014). Dietary Polyphenols, Berries, and Age-related Bone loss:  A review Based on Human, Animal, and Cell Studies. Antioxidants; 3(1): 144-158.
  • Langsetmo, L.; Hanley, D.A.; Prior, J.C.; Barr, S.I.; Anastassiades, T.; Towheed, T.; Goltzman, D.; Morin, S.; Poliquin, S.; Kreiger, N. (2011). Dietary patterns and incident low-trauma fractures in postmenopausal women and men aged ≥50 y: A population-based cohort study. Am. J. Clin. Nutr; 93: 192–199.
  • Miljkovic D.; Miljkovic N.; McCary M.F. (2004). Up-regulatory impact of boron on Vitamin D function—does it reflect inhibition of 24-hydroxylase?; Medical Hypteses; 63: 1054-1056.
  • New, S.A.; Robins, S.P.; Campbell, M.K.; Martin, J.C.; Garton, M.J.; Bolton-Smith, C.; Grubb, D.A.; Lee, S.J.; Reid, D.M. (2000) Dietary influences on bone mass and bone metabolism: Further evidence of a positive link between fruit and vegetable consumption and bone health? Am J Clin Nutr; 71, 142–151.
  • Ulluwishewa, D; Anderson, R.C.; McNabb W.C.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.M.; Roy, N.C. (2011). Regulation of Tight Junction Permeability by Intestinal Bacteria and Dietary Components. J Nutr; 141(5): 769-776.
  • Weitzmann, M.N. (2013). The Role of Inflammatory Cytokines, the RANKL/OPG Axis, and the Immunoskeletal Interface in Physiological Bone Turnover and Osteoporosis. Scientifica; 2013: 29 pages.
  • Welch, A.; MacGregor, A.; Jennings, A.; Fairweather-Tait, S.; Spector, T.; Cassidy, A. (2012). Habitual flavonoid intakes are positively associated with bone mineral density in women. J. Bone Miner. Res; 27: 1872–1878.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Take a quick look and click on this inspiring and beautiful video.  In West Oakland where liquor stores have replaced markets, The Peoples Grocery is creating a healthy alternative, offering access to organic produce.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

A leaky gut leads to chronic inflammation within our body (liu, li, & Neu, 2005).  And, chronic inflammation is causative for a whole host of non-communicable diseases—autoimmune disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, CVD, cancer, neurological disease and more (Goldsmith, 2014).

What factors lead to the prevention or treatment of Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Our diets greatly influence the make up of our GI tract microbiome.  Research data show that eating the right foods to supply plenty fiber and polyphenols on a regular basis creates a healthy balance of human friendly bacteria within our gastrointestinal system, leading to the tighteninng of the intestinal cellular junctions and the elimination of a leaky gut (Claussen, 2012).

To aid in the consistent intake of fiber, probiotics, and polyphenols:


Food Science

Health-promoting effects of the microflora may include immunostimulation, improved digestion and absorption, vitamin synthesis, inhibition of the growth of potential pathogens and lowering of gas distension.  Detrimental effects are carcinogen production, intestinal putrefaction, toxin production, diarrhoea/constipation and intestinal infections (Saulnier, 2009).

Stool microbiota of individuals with different types of habitual diets (e.g., vegetarians or vegans versus omnivores or from geopraphically distinct areas) have been charactertized.  It has become evident that the diet has a dominatn role on the stool microbiota and that the diet-driven changes in it occur with days to weeks (Simoes, 2013).

The data indicate that the frailest older people tend to harbour similar intestinal microbial communities.  The study also suggests that this shift in their gut microbiome is driven by a diet high in fat and lacking in fibre, and that a decline in our microbial community underlies ill health as we grow old (Wu, 2011; Claussen, 2012; Simoes, 2013.).

Bibliography

  • Claesson MJ, Jeffery IB, Conde S, Power SE, O’Conner EM, Cusack S, Harris HM … et al. (2012). Gut microbiota composition correlates with diet and health in the elderly. Nature; 9,488(7410). 178-84.
  • Goldsmith Jr, Sartor RB. (2014). The role of diet on intestinal microbiota metabolism: downstream impacts on host immune function and health, and therapeutic implications. J Gastroenterol, 49(5): 785-98.
  • Liu, Z., Li, N., & Neu, J. (2005). Tight junctions, leaky intestines, and pediatric diseases. Acta Paediatr, 94(4), 386-93.
  • Maukonen J, Saarela M. (2015). Human Gut microbiota:  Does diet matter? Proc Nutr Soc; 74(1): 23-36.
  • Saulnier MD, Kolida S, Gibson GR. (2009). Microbiology of the human intestinal tract and approaches for its dietary modulation. Curr Pharm Des; 15(13): 1403-14.
  • Simoes CD, Maukonen J, Kaprio J, Rissanen A, Poetiainen KH, Saarela M. (2013). Habitual dietary intake is associated with stool microbiota composition in monzygotic twins. J Nutr; 143(4): 417-23.
  • Tuohy KM, Gougolias C, Shen Q, Fava F, Ramnani P. (2009). Studying the human gut microbiota in the trans-omics era–focus on metagenomics and metabonomics. Curr Pham Des 15(13): 1415-27.
  • Wu GD, Chen J, Hoffmann C, Bittinger K, Chen YY, Keilbaugh SA … et al. (2011).  Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes. Science; 334(6052): 105-8.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3David Granet MD and Rob Knight PhD converse regarding the Microbiome. Some points by Knight:  Avoid fries and certain carbohydrates; but not all for fibers both soluble and insoluble are very important for microbiome health.  Also eat a rainbow of colored vegetables and fermented foods.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Regularity for Children

March 17, 2017

Dear Friends

Chronic constipation in our young population is a growing concern for parents and doctors.

Much of the discussion in the scientific community is focused upon fiber. We have formulated the Be Regular with five organic and gluten free seeds:  Amaranth, Buckwheat, Chia, Millet and Quinoa.

These seeds are ancient! They have been with us for thousands of years and globally used as foundational foods. Rich in both soluble and insoluble fibers, they contain essential nutrients such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates with an overall low glycemic index.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

Food Science

Lee and associates (2008) researched the bowel habits of 368 children aged 3-5years from kindergartens in Hong Kong.  Constipation was confirmed by Rome-criteria.  Consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole-grain cereals, and fluid were determined using a 3-day food record.

A total of 28.8% children were reported to have constipation. Median dietary fiber intake of constipated children was significantly lower than non-constipated.  Constipated children also had significantly lower intakes of vitamin C, folate and magnesium.  Fruit intake and total plant foods intake were significantly lower in the constipated than non-constipated children.

The authors conclusion was insufficient dietary fiber intake is common in Hong Kong pre-school children. And that constipated children had significantly lower intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients which was attributed to the under-consumption of plant foods.

We have known fiber is central for regularity for a long time. Almost two decades ago, a study by Morais (1999) evaluated the fiber intake of children with chronic constipation using two tables of fiber composition of foods, a Brazilian table that counts values of soluble and insoluble fiber, and a table based on the method of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC).

The researcher’s results determined that the total fiber intake of the constipated children was lower than the control group of children with daily, healthy bowel moments.  The Brazilian table showed that the lower consumption of total fiber was attributable to a low intake of insoluble fiber whereas the intake of soluble fiber was not significantly different between the two groups.

Bibliography

  • Lee, W.T., Ip, K.S., Chan, J.S., Lui, N.W., & Young, B.W. (2008). Increased prevalence of constipation in pre-school children is attributable to under-consumption of plant foods: a community-based study. J Paediatr Child Health, 44,170–175.
  • Morais, M.B., Vítolo, M.R., Aguirre, A.N., & Fagundes-Neto, U. (1999). Measurement of low dietary fiber intake as a risk factor for chronic constipation in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 29, 132–135.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3More that ever we need to tune in, learn from and support organizations like The Environmental Working Group.  Here is their 2017 Dirty Dozen.  EWG’s analysis of tests by the U.S. Deparment of Agriculture found that nearly 70 percent of samples of 48 types of conventionally grown produce were contaminated with pesticide residues.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

A Smooth Move Every Day

March 13, 2017

Dear Friends

We love it when we have regular and thorough bowel movements.  Be Regular is formulated to accomplish this necessary task.

Be Regular jpeg 2

The five gluten-free organic seeds provide ample fiber to gently detox (absorb toxins) and move the bowels. Taken on a daily basis, Be Regular provides us with fiber and the deeply nutritious life-giving energy of ancient seeds.

The growing evidence in food science on the importance of fiber intake on a daily basis is  conclusive.  Check the Research Tab of Be Regular.  We have summarized a fraction of the bibliography available on the importance of fiber.

How to use Be Regular

  • Add to your morning shake or smoothie.  It will mix in beautifully
  • Add to the Beta Glucan Synbiotic for an added fiber and probiotics for heart health
  • Add to your hot or cold cereal in the morning
  • Add to soups and sauces as a thickening agent
  • Add to home made baked goods

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

Food Science

The public health implications of increasing dietary fiber intake to recommented levels for GI tract health and chronic disease prevention are significant.  Accumulating evidence indicates that greater dietary fiber intakes reduce risk for Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, weight gain, obesity and diverticular disease, as well as constipation (Crowe, 2011; Schmier, 2014).

Bibliography

  • Crowe, F.L., Appleby, P.N., Allen, N.E., Key, T.J. (2011). Diet and risk of diverticular disease in Oxford cohort of European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): prospective study of British vegetarians and non-vegetarians. BMJ, 343, d4131 doi: 10.1136/bmj.d4131.
  • Schmier, J.K., Mill, P.E., Levine, J.A., et al. (2014). Cost savings of reduced constipation rates attribted to increased dietary fiber intakes, a decision-analytic model. BMC Public Health, 14, 374.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3More that ever we need to tune in, learn from and support organizations like The Environmental Working Group.  Here is their 2017 Dirty Dozen.  EWG’s analysis of tests by the U.S. Deparment of Agriculture found that nearly 70 percent of samples of 48 types of conventionally grown produce were contaminated with pesticide residues.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Well, in just 12 days from today it’s the Hawaii Doc Talks Convention!, but who’s counting.

On Friday March 3rd we will host the breakfast in Maui and teach on a topic that gets right to the heart of the matter regarding food as medicine:  The Intelligence and Power of Therapeutic Food Supplements: Science, Research, and Protocol.

Click on the above link to the see our learning objectives for the doctors.  The third objective is: Discover the next generation probiotics — infection fighting Supernatant metabolites and immune boosting microRNA.

Remember, if you can’t join us this time around, I would be more than happy to meet you via the zoom meeting format online.  Just let me know and we’ll set it up.

The two photos below present our synbiotic formulas.  The top one highlighting our new LactORN Synbiotic and the photo below seven more probiotic offerings.

LactORNs

Understanding our microbiome is without a question one of the hottest topics in medicine. Hippocrates, 2400 years ago, said that all disease begins in the gut.  In a recent speech Dr. Francis Collins, past director of the Human Microbiome Project, and present director of the NIH said,

We are a chimera-like creatire whose healthy metabolic and physiologic functioning is governed by not only our 10 trillion human cells and their 22,000 genes but also by our human microbiome community that co-habitate our bodies, all 100 trillion of them with their 2 to 8 million genes—most of them bacteria living in our GI tract. (2015, Supercharging Science for the Superorganism)

grp_2

“An ever-growing number of studies have demonstrated that changes in the composition of our microbiomes correlate with numerous disease states, raising the possibility that manipulation of these communities could be used to treat disease.”  (HMP Home page).

The microbiome must be taken into account regarding metabolic diseases (Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, Diabetes, Heart Disease), gastrointestinal disease (IBS, IBD), and neuroligical health.

Yours truly,

Seann Bardell CEO
BioImmersion Inc.

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

  • Dr. Francis Collins, the Director of the NIH recently said “The time of the importance of the microbiome and human health has arrived.  Our gut microbiome is of central importance for our immune system health, our neural-transmitter health, our GI tract health, and our metabolic health.