News

Dear Friends

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and dietary habits account for a large percentage of the risk for developing CRC (Pitsouni et al., 2009)

Can probiotic supplementation help in the prevention of colorectal cancer?

Azcarate-Peril et al. (2011), The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer, examined the peer reviewed medical literature and conclude that probiotics help protect against the development of colorectal cancer.  In their article, New scientific paradigms for probiotics and prebiotics, Reid et al. (2003) come to the same conclusion.

Additionally, Liu et al. (2011), in their randomized clinical trial on L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, and B. longum, concluded that probiotic treatment on barrier function and postoperative infectious complications in colorectal cancer surgery demonstrated beneficial results.

Therapeutic Food Probiotics to support CRC: according to the research, take 6 days before surgery, and 10 days after surgery (Liu et al., 2011).

Both the Original and Supernatant are formulated with probiotics shown in research to confer beneficial results.

Click on any of the links above to learn more about the probiotic bacteria within each of the formulas.

References

  • Azcarate-Peril, M.A., Sikes, M., Bruno-Barcena, J.M. (2011). The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer? Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, 301, G401-G424. doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00110.2011.
  • Liu, Z., Qin, H., Yang, Z., Xia, Y., Liu, W., Yang, J., Jiang, Y., Zhang, H., Wang, Y., Zheng, Q. (2011). Randomised clinical trial: the effects of perioperative probiotic treatment on barrier function and post-operative infectious complications in colorectal cancer surgery – a double-blind study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther, 33: 50–63, 2011.
  • Pitsouni, E., Alexiou, V., Saridakis, V., Peppas, G., Falagas, M.E. (2009). Does the use of probiotics/synbiotics prevent postoperative infections in patients undergoing abdominal surgery? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Eur J Clin Pharmacol65, 561–70. PubMed
  • Reid, G., Sanders, M.E., Gaskins, H.R., Gibson, G.R., Mercenier, A., Rastall, R., Roberfroid, M., Rowland, I., Cherbut, C., Klaenhammer, T.R. (2003). New scientific paradigms for probiotics and prebiotics. J Clin Gastroenterol, 37, 105–118.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Dear Friends

Cox and fellow researchers concluded in their paper, Lactobacillus casei Abundance is Associated with Profound Shifts in the Infant Gut Microbiome, that supplementing infants with Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus is positively associated with the promotion of a stable, even, and functionally redundant infant gastrointestinal community; and the reduced risk of atopy and asthma later in life (Cox et al., 2010).

Cox et al. (2010) hypothesize that Lactobacillus casei subsp. Rhamnosus  promote a clustering (a consortium of bugs that work well together) of known probiotic species within the infant gut that are more resistant to perturbation and outgrowth of pathogens (See Food Science below).

A randomized, controlled, double-blind study of 159 newborns, found that early feeding of Lactobacillus casei decrease the rate of atopic dermatitis at age two by 50% (Kalliomaki et al., 2001) and that this protective effect was sustained past infancy (Kalliomaki et al., 2003).

Colonization of the infant gut microorganisms over the first year of life is crucial for development of a balanced immune response; and, early alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota of neonates has been linked with subsequent development of asthma and atopy in older children (Cox et al., 2010).

Therapeutic Food Protocol for the Neonate LactORN Bottle 2

  • LactORN– 1/8th of a tsp twice a week (one way is to offer LactORN on your fingertip).

Comment:  LactORN contains Lactobacillius casei rhamnosus. LactOrn is blended with inulin derived from organic chicory root, functioning as an important prebiotic fiber.  It has a naturally sweet taste that babies and adults love.

Others of our synbiotic formulas, that have proven to be powerful probiotic formulas for children, are the Original Synbiotic, the Beta Glucan Synbiotic, and the Supernatant Synbiotic.  Click on their links to see their ingredients.  They all contain L. casei rhamnosus plus other good bugs that L. casei promotes a clustering for a healthy and stronger microbiome.

Food Science

Cox et al.’s (2010)  research question centered upon whether the demonstrable positive effects of L. casei rhamnosus was the result of a species-specific increase in relative abundance that accounts for its protective benefits, or, if there is a global effect on the complex GI microbial consortium.  In other words, is it the L. casei rhamnosus all by itself that is doing the disease-reducing work? Or, is it the presence of L. casei that somehow promotes the growth of other good probiotic organisms, and all together as a consortium (cluster) they protect and enhence the baby’s microbiome. They concluded it was the later, it takes a village to raise a baby!

Analysis of the phylogenetic (physical form/identity) differences characteristic of samples with high L. casei rhamnosus revealed a large number of taxa (families of organism) increased in relative abundance in these communities.  These included a number of known beneficial species belonging to the Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae.  Community phylogenetic metrics demonstrated that the promoted taxa were strongly phylogenetically related; and, suggests functional redundancy with GI communities that possess L. casei rhamnosus in high abundance.

In summary the Cox et al. L. casei rhamnosus study demonstrates that high abundance of this probiotic organism is associated with a dramatic change in GI microbial community composition in infants, impacting the relative abundance of a large number of taxa that can be beneficial in reducing the risk of allergy and atopy later in life.

References

  • Cox, M.J., Huang, Y.J., Huang Y.J., Fujimura, K.E., Liu, J.T., McKean, M., Boushey, H.A., Segal, M.R., Brodie, E.L., Cabana, M.D., Lynch, S.V. (2010). Lactobacillus casei Abundance Is Associated with Profound Shifts in the Infant Gut Microbiome. PLOS| one; Tenth Anniversary. Full paper.
  • Kalliomaki, M., Salminen, S., Arvilommi, H., Kero, P., Koskinen, P. et al (2001). Probiotic in primary prevention of atopic disease: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Lancet; 357: 1076-1079.
  • Kalliomaki, M., Salminen, S., Poussa, T., Arvilommi, H., Isolauri, E. (2003). Probiotics and prevention of atopic disease: 4-year follow-up of a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Lancet; 361: 1869-18

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
Blueberry Extract 4

The most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

Scientists describe blueberries as agents of neuro-regeneration. Research studies show that blueberry and blueberry extract offer a potent and effective brain food to support cognition, memory, and the general health of our nervous system.

The Blueberry Extract is Vegan, Kosher, Non GMO, and Gluten Free.

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cognitive Support.

Food Science

The Blueberry Extract offers the highest concentration of the North American blueberry species, Vaccinium corymbosum, with a significant broad-spectrum phenolic profile.

The Blueberry Extract is a powerful concentration of anthocyanins: It takes eighty pounds of blueberries to get one pound of the pure purple extract. This means that one capsule of the extract is equivalent to a cup and a quarter of whole blueberries.

Each vegan capsule has 500mg of the pure extract, without any excipients or fillers.

Tuft University’s James Joseph and Barbara Shukitt-Hale have researched the use and application of blueberries as potential therapeutic agents for many years. Their studies along with their colleagues demonstrate that blueberries and blueberry extract reverse and prevent brain aging (Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008; 2007) improve memory and motor skills (Carey et al., 2014; Malin et al., 2011; Brewer et al., 2010), repair neuronal tissue and function (Joseph et al., 2003; Miller et al., 2012) and serve as a potent anti-aging food (Joseph et al., 1999; 2009; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2015; 2012).

The Blueberry Extract was designed with Dr. Joseph assistance by converting some of the data from his research to human consumption.

Steward, Sridhar, and Meyer (2013) define regeneration of the nerves as a process of repairing or replacing nerve cells that have been damaged. Studies have hypothesized that an antioxidant-enriched diet may affect neuro-regeneration and inhibit inflammation (Szajdek & Borowska, 2008; Sweeney et al., 2002) due to their high anthocyanins.

Research studies and reviews by Latif (2015), Panickar & Anderson (2010), Subash et al. (2014), Panickar (2013), Schaffer et al. (2006), and Letenneur et al. (2007), demonstrate the great ability of flavonoids to offer a consistent neuro-protective nutraceuticals.

Stratheam et al. (2014) demonstrate that anthocyanin rich extracts of blueberries and grape seed* support the process of neuro regeneration by interfering with the neurotoxin, rotenone and improving the mitochondrial function. Gao et al. (2012) find that a habitual intake of dietary flavonoids is associated with a lower risk of developing neurological issues such as Parkinson, or lessening brain edema (Panickar & Anderson, 2010). Kovacsova et al. (2010) researched the biochemical pathways and molecular neuro-protective mechanisms of polyphenols in the brain. Antioxidant activity reduces neuro-inflammation and supports the prevention of neuro-degenerative (Stromberg et al., 2005). Williams & Spencer (2012) and Galli et al. (2006) show that a blueberry-supplemented diet reverses age-related declines with improved cognition and nerve regeneration.

The process of neurological regenerative ability of blueberries is linked to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of blueberries (Subash et al., 2014; Duffy et al., 2008; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008), effecting the reduction of NF Kappa beta, Cox-2 and Isoprostane (Youdim et al., 2002). For this reason, studies emphasize the important dietary role of blueberries with anthocyanins ability to reduce oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory cytokines (McAnulty et al., 2011).

Due to their high levels of anthocyanins, blueberries are also shown in research to contribute to heart health (McAnulty, 2014; Louis et al., 2014; Erlund et al., 2008; Youdim & Joseph, 2001).

How available are these anthocyanins? Mazza et al. (2002) has demonstrated that consumption of blueberries raises blood serum ORAC (antioxidant capacity). Emerging evidence confirms the ability of the human body to absorb anthocyanins, demonstrating a greater bioavailability (Bell et al., 2015), prolonged circulation, and relatively high concentration of anthocyanins metabolites (Lila et al., 2016).

See the Research tab for additional bibliography to further understand the application and use of blueberry and blueberry extract.
* See High ORAC Synbiotic Formula

References

Erlund, I., Koli, R., Alfthan, G., Marniemi, J., Puukka, P., Mustonen, P… Jula, A. (2008). Favorable effects of berry consumption on platelet function, blood pressure, and HDL cholesterol. Am J Clin Nutr 87, 323-331. Article

Galli, R.L., Bielinski, D.F., Szprengiel, A., Shukitt-Hale, B., Joseph, J.A. (2006). Blueberry supplemented diet reverses age-related decline in hippocampal HSP70 neuroprotection. Neurobio Aging, 27, 344-350. DOI:
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2005.01.017

Gao, X., Cassidy, A., Schwarzschild, M.A., Rimm, E.B., & Ascherio, A. (2012). Habitual intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of Parkinson disease. Neurology, 78(10), 1138-45. doi:  10.1212/WNL.0b013e31824f7fc4

Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009

Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale, B., & Lau, F.C. (2007). Fruit polyphenols and their effects on neuronal signaling and behavior in senescence. Ann NY Acd Sci, 1100, 470-85. DOI:10.1196/annals.1395.052

Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6 (3), 153-162. DOI:
10.1080/1028415031000111282

Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale, B., Denisova, N.A., Bielinski, D., Martin, A., McEwen, J.J., & Bickford, P.C. (1999). Reversals of age-related declines in neuronal signal

Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009

Kovacsova, M., Barta, A., Parohova, J., Vrankova, S., Pechanova, O. (2010). Neuroprotective mechanisms of natural polyphenolic compounds. Act Nerv Super Rediviva, 52, 181-186. Abstract

Latif, R. (2015). Flavonoids as novel neuroprotective nutraceuticals. Saudi J Health Sci, 4, 1-4. DOI:10.4103/2278-0521.151402

McAnulty, L.S., Nieman, D.C., Dumke, C.L., Shooter, D.A., Henson, D.A., Utter, A.C., … McAnulty, S.R. (2011). Effect of blueberry ingestion on natural killer cell counts, oxidative stress, and inflammation prior to and after 2.5 h of running. Appl Physio Nutr Metab, 36(6), 976-84. DOI:10.1139/h11-120

Panickar, K.S., & Jang, S. (2013). Dietary and plant polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects and improve cognitive function in cerebral ischemia. Recent Pat Food Nutr Agric, 5(2), 128-43. DOI: 10.2174/1876142911305020003
Schaffer, S., Eckert, G.P., Schmitt-Schilling, S., & Muller, W.E. (2006). Plant foods and brain aging: a critical appraisal. Forum Nutr, 59, 86-115. DOI:10.1159/000095209

Shukitt-Hale, B., Bielinski, D.F., Lau, F.C., Willis, L.M., Carey, A.N., & Joseph, J.A. (2015). The beneficial effects of berries on cognition, motor behaviour and neuronal function in ageing. Br J Nutr, 114(10), 1542-9. DOI:10.1017/S0007114515003451

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.
Green Facts:

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©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Phyto Power and Cancer

April 19, 2017

Dear Friends

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder from Alaska.  Grown in harsh yet pure and fertile environments, Alaskan wild berries and plants are strong and potent (Grace et al., 2014).

Alaskan potent wildcrafted berries and plants supply an abundance of antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial factors shown to promote and maintain a healthy functioning body (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013).

In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high. Alaska wild berries ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values even increased.

There is abundance research in the peer-reviewed journals today on health benefits of the individual constituents within Phyto Power as being important to consider for a whole host of conditions—from metabolic syndrome, to cognitive decline, to fatty liver, to high blood pressure, etc … in this Forward Thinking we will focus on cancer.

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cancer Support.

Food Science

Blueberries, Rose hip, and Dandelion show a great potential as a daily nutritional supplement due to vast research on their effect on different cancers. For example, blueberries are shown to inhibit growth and metastatic potential (Adams et al., 2010), and manage gastrointestinal tract cancers (Bishayee et al., 2016). Rose hip has shown to effect human brain cell proliferation (Cagle et al., 2012) and antiproliferation effect on Caco-2 human colon cancer (Jiménez et al., 2016), while Dandelion was found to induce apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells (Chatterjee et al., 2011; see also Hu et al., 2003 and Jeon et al., 2008, for further reading on dandelion). Research has shown great promise for their various effects on cancer.

Phyto Power is comprised of several species of wildcrafted blueberries, Rose hips, and Dandelions. Growing wild and strong in remote areas of Alaska, these berries and plants are handpicked at the peak of their phytonutrient potential. For centuries, indigenous tribes of Alaskan natives have used these power-filled berries and plants for their daily meals as well as ceremonial and medicinal purposes.

Phyto Power is potent because of its Alaskan red Rose hip fruit and seeds, blue-purple blueberries, with twigs and leaves, and the Dandelion’s green leaves, stems, roots, and yellow flowers. These vibrant phytochemicals protect and enhance the health of both plants and humans (Joseph, Nadeau, & Underwood, 2003). James Duke’s (2000) substantial USDA phytochemical database was compiled to illustrate how (and why) the world of plants heals and protects (p. 2).

Bibliography

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75.
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy,3(5), 13.
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045. doi: 10.1155/2011/129045.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537–552.
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi: 10.1021/jf403810y.
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82–88.
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136.
  • Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients? Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204.
  • Joseph, J., Nadeau, D., & Underwood, A. (2003). The color code: A revolutionary eating plan for optimum health. New York, NY: The Philip Lief Group, Inc.
  • Kristo, A.S., Klimis-Zacas, D., Sikalidis, A.K. (2016). Protective Role of Dietary Berries in Cancer. Antioxidants (Basel), 5(4), 37. doi:10.3390/antiox5040037
  • Ovadje, P., Ammar, S., Guerrero, J.A., Arnason, J.T., Pandey, S. (2016). Dandelion root extract affects colorectal cancer proliferation and survival through the activation of multiple death signalling pathways. Oncotarget, 7(45):73080-73100.
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. doi: 10.1021/jf400823s.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Watch the new trailer An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.    The sequel to An Inconvenient Truth.  In theatres July 28, 2017.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Neuro-regeneration

April 9, 2017

Dear Friends,

Cognitive decline, memory loss, and foggy thinking are on the rise and do not automatically accompany old age but affect all ages (Joseph, 2009).

Plant polyphenols and a healthy microbiome in the GI tract have shown to strongly support a healthy functioning nervous system, regenerate nerve tissue and protect against the onset of neuro-degenerative decline (Brewer et al., 2010; Burokas et al., 2015).

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cognitive Support.

Food Science

A declining nervous system leads to the problematic onset of neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s).  Protecting against this decline, berry fruit polyphenols were examined, and in particular, blueberry extract anthocyanins for their multiplicity of actions that goes beyond the established antioxidant ability (Galli et al., 2002). The other possible mechanisms for the berry’s positive effects include: direct effects on signaling to enhance neuronal communication (Joseph et al., 2003), the ability to buffer against excess calcium (Joseph et al., 2004), enhancement of neuroprotective stress shock proteins (Galli et al., 2006), and reduction of stress signals such as nuclear factor B (NF-B) (Goyarzu et al., 2004).  Additionally, the anthocyanins contained in blueberries have been shown to enter the brain, and their concentrations were correlated with cognitive performance (Andres-Lacueva et al., 2005).

The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract. Regulation of the microbiota-brain-gut axis is essential for maintaining homeostasis, including that of the CNS. It is clear that the gut microbiota can be a key regulator of mood, cognition, pain, and obesity (Burokas et al., 2015; Borre et al., 2014).

Bibliography

  • Andres-Lacueva, C., Shukitt-Hale, B., Galli RL., Jauregui O., Lamuela-Reventos, RM., Joseph, J. (2005). Anthocyanins in aged blueberry-fed rats are found centrally and may enhance memory. Nutr Neurosci; 8:111-120.
  • Borre, Y.E., Moloney, R.D., Clarke, G., Dinana, T.G., Cryan, J.F. (2014). The impact of microbiota on brain and behavior: mechanisms & therapeutic potential. Adv Exp Med Biol, 817, 373-403.
  • Brewer, G.J., Torricelli, J.R., Lindsey, A.L., Kunz, E.Z., Neuman, A., Fisher, D.R., & Joseph, J.A. (2010). Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract. J Nutr Biochem, 21, 991-998.
  • Burokas, A., Moloney, RD., Dinan, TG., Cryan, JF. (2015). Microbiotia regulation of the Mammalian gut-brain axis. Adv Appl Microbiol; 91(1): 1-62.
  • Galli, R.L., Shukitt-Hale, B., Youdim, K.A.. Joseph, J.A. (2002). Fruit polyphenolics and brain aging:  nutritional interventions targeting age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits. Ann NY Acad Sci; 959: 128-32.
  • Galli,RL., Bielinski, DF., Szprengiel, A., Shukitt-Ale, B., Joseph, J. (2006). Blueberry supplemented diet reverses age-related decline in hippocampal HSP70 neuroprotection.  Neurobiol Aging; 27:344-350.
  • Goyarzu, P., Malin, DH., Lau FC., Taglialatela, G. Moon, WD., Jennings, R., Moy, E., et al. (2004).  Blueberry supplemented diet: effects on object recognition memory and nuclear factor kappa B levels in aged rats. Nutr Neurosci: 7:75-83.
  • Joseph, J., Denisova, NA., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003).  Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci 6:153-162.
  • Joseph, J., Fisher, D.R., Carey, AN. (2004). Fruit extracts antagonize Abeta- or DA- induced deficits in Ca2++ flux in M1-transfect COS-7 cells. J Alzheimers Dis; 6:403;discussion 443-9.
  • Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J Neurosci; 29(41): 12795-801.
  • Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6, 153-162.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved