Protocols for Health

Dear Doctor

Let’s face it, we are not eating enough fiber. Recent published reviews continue to highlight the connection between eating enough fiber, especially from plants, to lower cholesterol and improve heart health.

Statins are prescribed to lower cholesterol, however, there are side-effects that are not tolerable.

Two review from the USA and the UK summarize our need to increase fiber, especially the kind that lowers cholesterol, like beta glucan.

In the USA, Dr. Ghada Soliman, an associate professor of Nutrition in the Department of Environmental, Occupational and Geospatial Health Sciences, concludes her review of the literature that higher intake of fiber can in fact lower the need for statins. Some people may need statins but in much lower dosage.

Here are other fiber functions in the article by Ghada A. Soliman:

Dietary fiber has several protective effects against chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel syndrome, diverticular disease, obesity, and colorectal cancer in the age-adjusted analysis [77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84]. For example, insoluble fiber binds to and adsorbs carcinogens, mutagens, and toxins, and therefore, prevents their harmful effects to the body, by preventing the toxins absorption and targeting them for elimination [83,85,86]. Other fiber properties include delayed colonic transit time, prolonged post-meal satiety and satiation, and induction of cholecystokinin satiety hormone [87,88]. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics position on fiber intake is to increase consumption of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, nuts and legumes, and that dietary fiber is associated with risk reduction of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and select cancer types [89].

In the UK, Dr Charlotte Elizabeth Evans, an associate professor in nutritional epidemiology and public health nutrition, speaks highly of high fiber intake and the positive association between fiber and health benefits such as cardio-vascular health (2019).

Dietary fibre and cardiovascular health: a review of current evidence and policy

Charlotte Elizabeth Louise Evans:

Dietary fibre comprises many different, mainly plant-based, compounds that are not fully digested in the human gut. Insoluble fibres include cellulose, hemi-celluloses and lignin and soluble fibres include pectins, β-glucan and hydro-colloids. In the UK, the daily recommended amount has increased to 30 g but only 13 % of men and 4 % of women meet this recommendation. Currently the mean intake for adults is 21 g for men and 17 g for women. There is a wealth of epidemiological evidence based on systematic reviews of trials and cohorts to support the higher fibre recommendation. This includes evidence of reductions in the risk for CVD (both heart disease and stroke) and lower risk of type 2 diabetes, lower blood pressure, lower LDL-cholesterol, as well as some cancers. Beneficial effects of fibre operate via a diverse range of mechanisms throughout the digestive system including the mouth, stomach and small and large intestine; some of which are still not completely understood. The updated recommendation for fibre is a long way from a typical British diet and requires several daily portions of fruit and vegetables and wholegrain foods. Improving dietary fibre intakes will require a variety of actions and policies from stakeholders; however, there is currently more of a focus on reducing sugar than increasing fibre. In order to increase the number of adults meeting the fibre recommendation, social marketing and labeling of high-fibre foods are warranted as well as reformulation and wider availability of wholegrain versions of popular foods. 

References

  • Evans, C. E. L. (2019). Dietary fibre and cardiovascular health: a review of current evidence and policy. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 1-7.Article
  • Soliman, G. A. (2019). Dietary Fiber, Atherosclerosis, and Cardiovascular Disease. Nutrients11(5), 1155. Article

Beta Glucan Synbiotic: High Potency Cardiovascular and Metabolic Support provides these highly beneficial beta glucan and other important dietary fibers from beetroot and inulin from chicory root along with key pedigreed probiotic bacteria.

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To your health,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts.  Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.  (Walter Willett MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2019)

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©2005 – 2019 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Doctor

Cognitive decline is a serious issue many aging and younger adults face. The CDC released A Call for Action bulletin with the estimate of 16 million people living with cognitive impairment. Over 5.1 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease (2014; 2011). Marcum et al.’s (2019) survey found that most people are aware of the risks associated with getting dementias but do not know what to do.

The research teams guided by James Joseph and Shukitt-Hale have studied blueberries and brain health for many years (e.g., 2010), with a recent study confirming that a daily supplementation of blueberries reverse age-related deficits in different groups of aged rats (2019). Both Travica et al. (2019) and Dodd et al. (2019) found blueberry supplementation in adults and children improve cognition performance, and in particular, improve short – and long-term memory.

Wilhelmina Kalt has also led many research teams to study the power of blueberries (e.g., 2013). In a recent article, her team (2019) reviewed current research on the health benefits of blueberries and concluded that it is widely agreed that regular consumption of blueberries can be unconditionally recommended.

Blueberries contain large amounts of phytochemicals, and in particular, blueberries are abundant with anthocyanin pigments, which according to Kalt et al. (2019) makes the greatest impact on brain health.

Our Blueberry Extract is highly concentrated: 80 kilos make 1 kilo of extract – a powerhouse of anthocyanins! Furthermore, the Blueberry Extract is pure: 100% free of any fillers, excipients or flowing agents.

1-2 capsules twice daily for two weeks to start an intensive program, and 1 capsule a day as a maintenance.

Order Now: Blueberry-Extract

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References

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). Cognitive impairment: a call for action now 2011.
  • Dodd, G. F., Williams, C. M., Butler, L. T., & Spencer, J. P. (2019). Acute effects of flavonoid-rich blueberry on cognitive and vascular function in healthy older adults. Nutrition and Healthy Aging, (Preprint), 1-14.Article
  • Kalt, W., Cassidy, A., Howard, L. R., Krikorian, R., Stull, A. J., Tremblay, F., & Zamora-Ros, R. (2019). Recent Research on the Health Benefits of Blueberries and Their Anthocyanins. Advances in Nutrition.Article
  • Kalt, W., Lawand, C., Ryan, D. A., McDonald, J. E., Donner, H., & Forney, C. F. (2003). Oxygen radical absorbing capacity, anthocyanin and phenolic content of highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) during ripening and storage. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science128(6), 917-923. Article
  • Krikorian, R., Shidler, M. D., Nash, T. A., Kalt, W., Vinqvist-Tymchuk, M. R., Shukitt-Hale, B., & Joseph, J. A. (2010). Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry58(7), 3996-4000.Article
  • Marcum, Z. A., Hohl, S. D., Gray, S. L., Barthold, D., Crane, P. K., & Larson, E. B. (2019). Brain health and dementia prevention: A mixed-method analysis. American journal of health behavior43(2), 300-310.AbstractShukitt-Hale, B., Thangthaeng, N., Miller, M. G., Poulose, S. M., Carey, A. N., & Fisher, D. R. (2019). Blueberries Improve Neuroinflammation and Cognition differentially Depending on Individual Cognitive baseline Status. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A74(7), 977-983.Abstract
  • Travica, N., D’Cunha, N. M., Naumovski, N., Kent, K., Mellor, D. D., Firth, J., … & Marx, W. (2019). The effect of blueberry interventions on cognitive performance and mood: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Brain, behavior, and immunity.Abstract

To your health,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts.  Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.  (Walter Willett MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2019)

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©2005 – 2019 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Doctor

Bader (2017) update on the status of urinary tract infections (UTIs) emphasizes the growing concern of UTIs caused by antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli, Salmonella, Klebeiella– all part of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Treating UTIs with drugs like Fosfomycin tromethamine, amoxicillin, and others are the typical course of action, but what do we do when these drugs do not resolve the UTI?

Proanthocyanidin from Cranberries and Pomegranates have been used for many years as anti-adhesive agents in the treatment of UTI. Gupta et al. (2012) showed in his study that a drug resistant E. coli was sensitive to an extract from cranberries on bladder infection by inhibiting the adhesiveness of multi-drug resistant E. coli to the walls. In 2015 Kaspar et al. assessed the anti-adhesion effect of cranberry extract to improve urinary tract health. More recently, the research and reviews of Lima et al. (2019) and González de Llanoet al. (2019) showed new findings on the efficacy of cranberries against urinary tract infections due to the rich source of phenolic compounds.

Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic has the added antimicrobial activity of pomegranate, with probiotics, supernatant and microRNA. 2-4 capsule three times a day for three days as intensive support or until condition resolved.

Order Now: Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic

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References

  • Bader, M. S., Loeb, M., & Brooks, A. A. (2017). An update on the management of urinary tract infections in the era of antimicrobial resistance. Postgraduate medicine129(2), 242-258.Abstract
  • González de Llano, D., Liu, H., Khoo, C., Moreno-Arribas, M. V., & Bartolomé, B. (2019). Some New Findings Regarding the Antiadhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Bacteria. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry67(8), 2166-2174.Article
  • Gupta, A., Dwivedi, M., Mahdi, A.A., Nagana Gowda, G.A., Khetrapal, C.L., Bhandari, M. (2012). Inhibition of adherence of multi-drug resistant E. coli by proanthocyanidin. Urol Res, 40(2), 143-50. DOI: 10.1007/s00240-011-0398-2
  • Kaspar, K.L., Howell, A.B., & Khoo, C. (2015). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the bacterial anti-adhesion effects of cranberry extract beverages.Food Funct, 6(4), 1212-7. DOI: 10.1039/c4fo01018c
  • Lima, M. C., de Sousa, C. P., Fernandez-Prada, C., Harel, J., Dubreuil, J. D., & de Souza, E. L. (2019). A review of the current evidence of fruit phenolic compounds as potential antimicrobials against pathogenic bacteria. Microbial pathogenesis.Abstract
  • Rodríguez-Pérez, C., Quirantes-Piné, R., Uberos, J., Jiménez-Sánchez, C., Peña, A., & Segura-Carretero, A. (2016). Antibacterial activity of isolated phenolic compounds from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) against Escherichia coli. Food & function7(3), 1564-1573. Article
  • Wafa, B. A., Makni, M., Ammar, S., Khannous, L., Hassana, A. B., Bouaziz, M., … & Gdoura, R. (2017). Antimicrobial effect of the Tunisian Nana variety Punica granatum L. extracts against Salmonella enterica (serovars Kentucky and Enteritidis) isolated from chicken meat and phenolic composition of its peel extract. International journal of food microbiology241, 123-131. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2016.10.007

To your health,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts.  Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.  (Walter Willett MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2019)

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©2005 – 2019 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Doctor

According to Lambeau & McRorie (2017), only 5% of adults consume the recommended amount of fiber! And even worse, many fiber supplements do not actually provide the health benefit that is associated with dietary fiber.

Dietary fiber is shown in research to help with many functions in our body, such as bowel regularity, improving short-term glycemic control, and reducing cardiovascular disease including lowering LDL cholesterol. Beta-glucan has a special gel-forming fiber that significantly increase the viscosity of chyme in the small intestine, slowing down the absorption of glucose.  Chyme is a thin liquid composed of nutrients and digestive enzymes which is absorbed readily in the intestines. Other fibers that are non-viscous soluble fiber like inulin, wheat dextrin, guar gum along with insoluble fiber like wheat bran do not have this gel-forming ability.

But what about long term glycemic control in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes? Short term (postprandial) glycemic control is very important for acute glycemic effects of fiber, but what about a more long-term effect of fiber? Multiple studies have shown that gel-forming fibers like psyllium or B-glucan show a reduction in fasting serum glucose, insulin, and Ab A1 C in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes (Lambeau & McRorie, 2017).

The increase in chyme viscosity by gel-forming dietary fiber also lowers elevated serum cholesterol by trapping and eliminating bile (McRorie & Fahey, 2015). Read Lambeau & McRorie (2017) for a detailed technical Review

How much fiber do you need? Institute of medicine recommends 25 grams for women, and 38 grams for men per day.

Order Now:  Beta Glucan Synbiotic has the American Heart Association Seal of Approval for healthy heart dietary fiber. 2 tablespoon a day is the suggested use.
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References

  • Lambeau, K.V., McRorie, J.W. Jr. (2017). Fiber supplements and clinically proven health benefits: How to recognize and recommend an effective fiber therapy. J Am Assoc Nurse Pract, 29(4), 216-223. Article
  • McRorie, J., & Fahey, G. (2015). Fiber supplements and clinically meaningful health benefits: Identifying the physiochemical characteristics of fiber that drive specific physiologic effects. In T. C. Wallace (Ed.), The CRC handbook on dietary supplements in health promotion (pp. 161–206). Florence, KY: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.

To your health,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts.  Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.  (Walter Willett MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2019)

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©2005 – 2019 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Doctor

Did you miss Dr. Dohrea Bardell’s new articles, The Science of Longevity: Preventing and Reversing Chronic Diseases? If you did, go to the BioImmersion Home Page, mouse over the Resource Tab and click on the News.  They are a very important read.

Chronic diseases pose a pandemic and old age has become a long, diseased ridden process. Yet, longevity scientists say that it doesn’t have to be this way.  There is a path to a disease free long life, to the very end. Organizations like the WHO (the World Health Organization) have been researching for decades how to reverse the root cause of chronic diseases. Their answer is clear and profound: we must lower chronic low grade inflammation (LGI) that is known by longevity researchers as the intrinsic aging clock, and we do this by changing our diets to a plant-based diet and cleaning up our environment, thereby reducing the toxic load on our bodies.

Order Now:  The No. 7 Systemic Booster: the New Longevity is a foundational product. It is designed to slow down the intrinsic aging clock and lower the toxic load on our body.

 

No 7 Photo_2 copy

 

The No 7 contains:  Potent Phytonutrients– Concentrates of Organic berries, fruits, hardy vegetables, and green leafy vegetables: strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, tart cherry, elderberry, cranberry, apple extract, pineapple, beet, broccoli florets, kale leaves, spinach leaves. BioImmersion Super Blend: ProbioticsBifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Steptococcus thermophilus. Supernatant– probiotic metabolites, and ORNs.  PrebioticsInulin from Chicory Root along with Fibers- from organic veggies, greens, fruits, and berries. VitalNutriceuticals– Fructo Borate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D3, Folate, and Chromium.

If you click on the No. 7 hyper-link above, and scroll down to the bottom of the Description Tab you will see the many research articles relevant to No. 7.

References:

  • Calder, P. C., Bosco, N., Bourdet-Sicard, R., Capuron, L., Delzenne, N., Doré, J., … & Visioli, F. (2017). Health relevance of the modification of low grade inflammation in ageing (inflammageing) and the role of nutrition. Ageing research reviews40, 95-119. Article.   

To your health,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts.  Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar with have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.  (Walter Willett MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2019)

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©2005 – 2019 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved