Dear Friends,

Can you name this Beautiful Creature?

We are living in monumental times. There is a crack in our universe, an opportunity for us to go into another dimension.

I am a baby boomer, a child of the 60s, the hippy generation. A senseless war in Vietnam was raging, the youth of America were forced to serve and they revolted against the establishment—the corporate, governmental and cultural powers that were sending us to die in a senseless war.

We turned inward, through mind-altering drugs initially, in an attempt to discover who and what we were. We embraced the spiritual traditions from the East—Zen, yoga, meditation, fasting, macrobiotic, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam.

Our lives were transformed; medicine embraced holistic, integrative practices. East met West, changing and touching us all deeply.

In the early years of the hippy revolution, we experienced heady high hopes for the future with love as the centerpiece of the movement. But that didn’t last long. We became centered on love of self, not love of the other.

By the 80s, the light that illuminated change was snuffed out and we descended back into the mainstream as the dominant cultural, governmental, and corporate powers reprogrammed us to get back into the rat race of consumerism—make all the money to buy more and more stuff. The brief opportunity of loving concern for others was gone.

But now, in 2011, the light has dawned again. There is a crack again in our universe brought on by in large the young people in the Middle East, standing up and revolting against the establishment, demanding freedom, equity, a better life.

Are we going to seize this moment and jump on board? What are we to stand up against? Who is oppressing us? I would venture to say it is the transnational corporations and their bedfellows—governments in the West and the East, democratic and totalitarian alike, who allow the Monsanto’s of the world to go unheeded. In our own country we live unsustainable lives. Our ecological footprint is destroying the ecosystems in the air, land and sea. We support totalitarian leaders all over the world in order to get cheap oil, minerals, and other resources to feed our consumerism. People are starving, suffering, diseased—because of our practices.

But young people are again standing up to fight. The Middle East is aflame with the desire for freedom and a better life. It is a time for activism; to get involved, get off the sidelines and take part in a cause—to embrace something worthy of our existence.

We in the health field are acutely aware of the sickening of the human population. We have a front row seat. But, this chronic illness goes beyond our human race; it is particularly affecting all of the higher phyla. Even in our oceans, where oceanographers are now predicting that all larger species of fish and mammals will be gone in the next 50 years if we don’t achieve a dramatic turn around. How can we each get involved? This needs to be our mantra.

For ourselves, we are in the business of food, the business of viewing food as medicine. Just imagine what our world would be like if we mandated worldwide the production of food by organic means—that organic farming was the law of the land. Here in America, we talk about changing to clean energy—sustainable energy. Just imagine what a revolution for a totally organic America would create. Heaven.

The good news is that this movement for good change is happening all around us. A billion peasants from all over the world are a part of the Via Campesina movement, corporations all over the world are setting goals for sustainability through the Natural Step, human being are encouraged to slow down and cook meals with natural organic foods through the Slow Food Movement. Below in Green Facts I’ve given you links to seven exciting life-changing organizations. Check them out. Let’s make it our mantra to ask: how can I get involved? Where does my soul desire to participate?

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

BioImmersion.com

Clinical Note:

What makes our Therapeutic Foods therapeutic? The environment that they are grown in; free of herbicides and pesticides, and soil that is rich in nutrients. We select varieties of plant that have especially high actives, and use food-processing technologies that don’t damage protein structures and other sensitive nutrients. We don’t use excipients. Our product is 100% food. All this takes a tremendous amount of time and effort to produce because our food system today is not set up on a large scale to produce such quality. On the bigger activist scale this is our mission, to make farming an organic process that is available to every human being.

The Last Quiz Answer:

This beautiful creature is of course a spotted hyena. Spotted hyenas are the largest of three hyena species. Brown and striped hyenas are the other two. Although hyenas appear similar to dogs, they are actually more closely related to cats. They live throughout much of Africa and eastwards through Arabia to India. Spotted hyenas live together in large groups called clans that may include up 80 individuals and are led by females.

Spotted hyenas have good hearing and sharp eyesight at night. They are fast and can run for long distances without tiring. Packs work together effectively to isolate a herd animal, sometimes one that is ill or infirm, and pursue it to the death. The victors often squabble over the spoils, either among themselves or with other powerful animals like lions.



There are so many wonderful groups to get involved with. Here are seven powerful organizations from around the world to become very familiar with: The Natural Step, Via Campesina, Slow Foods, Permaculture, Heifer International, TEDx, Ecoliteracy and CSAs.