Dear Doctor

How can we best protect ourselves from invasion by COVID-19?

In 2006 I explained the dangers of microbial invasion under the section called “pandemic” in a monograph for the Original Synbiotic:

We live in a sea of a growing numbers of pollutants that weaken our immune systems, and increasingly virulent and hostile microbes waiting for opportunity to invade our bodies.  The most vulnerable areas in the body are the mucous membrane surfaces of the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract. (Bardell, S., 2006. Original Synbiotic Monograph).

Key to our protection is the mucous membrane of our GI tract,  respiratory system, nose, and eyes: our immune cells in the mucous membrane must be able to protect us.

We are protected in two ways: the first one is by having a healthy coating of mucous covering on the surface of the one-cell layer thick membranes of the GI tract and Respiratory tract. This is called the mucous membrane. And two, by having a sufficient amount of secretory IgA molecules within the mucous layers.

People with healthy levels of both mucous thickness and secretory IgA are able to block the viruses so that they can’t infect the lining epithelial cells and enter into our bodies.  In other words, we can be exposed to the virus without “catching it.”  However, individuals with compromised immunity caused by too much exposure to pollution, stress, faulty diets, or chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, cancer and others, are at risk of invasion by viruses including Coronavirus.

One very good way to enhance a thickening of the mucous layer and an increase in secretory IgA production is through a regular consumption of excellent probiotic like our Original Synbiotic Formula.  We just created a brand new batch.

The Original contains five pedigreed strains of probiotics and organic chicory root as its prebiotic.  Take one teaspoon a day.

O F

References:

  • De Champs, C., Maroncle, N., Balestrino, Damien., Rich, C., Forestier, C. (2003). Persistence of Colonization of Intestinal Mucosa by A Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus casei subsp rhamnosus Lcr35, after Oran Consumption. J Com Microbiol; 41(3): 1270-1273.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC150315/
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Panigrahi, P., Pradhan, L., Mohapatra, S.S., Misra, P.R., Johnson, J.A., Chaudhry, R., Taylor, S., Hanse, N.I., Gewolb, I.H. (2008). Long-term colonization of a Lactobacillus plantarum synbiotic preparation in the neonatal gut. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 47(1):45-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607268
  • Sarem-Damerdji, L., Sarem, F., Marchal, L., Micolas, J.P. (1995). In vitro colonization ability of human colon mucosa by exogenous Lactobacillus strains. FEMS Microbiology Letters; 131(2):133-137. https://academic.oup.com/femsle/article-abstract/131/2/133/524865/In-vitro-colonization-ability-of-human-colon?redirectedFrom=PDF
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of food science and technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Toscano, M., De Grandi, R., Stronati, L., De Vecchi, E., & Drago, L. (2017). Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the healthy gut microbiota composition at phyla and species level: A preliminary study. World journal of gastroenterology, 23(15), 2696.
  • Underwood, M. A., German, J. B., Lebrilla, C. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut. Pediatric research, 77, 229.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350908/

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Best to you,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

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