Dear Friends

A leaky gut leads to chronic inflammation within our body (liu, li, & Neu, 2005).  And, chronic inflammation is causative for a whole host of non-communicable diseases—autoimmune disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, CVD, cancer, neurological disease and more (Goldsmith, 2014).

What factors lead to the prevention or treatment of Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Our diets greatly influence the make up of our GI tract microbiome.  Research data show that eating the right foods to supply plenty fiber and polyphenols on a regular basis creates a healthy balance of human friendly bacteria within our gastrointestinal system, leading to the tighteninng of the intestinal cellular junctions and the elimination of a leaky gut (Claussen, 2012).

To aid in the consistent intake of fiber, probiotics, and polyphenols:


Food Science

Health-promoting effects of the microflora may include immunostimulation, improved digestion and absorption, vitamin synthesis, inhibition of the growth of potential pathogens and lowering of gas distension.  Detrimental effects are carcinogen production, intestinal putrefaction, toxin production, diarrhoea/constipation and intestinal infections (Saulnier, 2009).

Stool microbiota of individuals with different types of habitual diets (e.g., vegetarians or vegans versus omnivores or from geopraphically distinct areas) have been charactertized.  It has become evident that the diet has a dominatn role on the stool microbiota and that the diet-driven changes in it occur with days to weeks (Simoes, 2013).

The data indicate that the frailest older people tend to harbour similar intestinal microbial communities.  The study also suggests that this shift in their gut microbiome is driven by a diet high in fat and lacking in fibre, and that a decline in our microbial community underlies ill health as we grow old (Wu, 2011; Claussen, 2012; Simoes, 2013.).

Bibliography

  • Claesson MJ, Jeffery IB, Conde S, Power SE, O’Conner EM, Cusack S, Harris HM … et al. (2012). Gut microbiota composition correlates with diet and health in the elderly. Nature; 9,488(7410). 178-84.
  • Goldsmith Jr, Sartor RB. (2014). The role of diet on intestinal microbiota metabolism: downstream impacts on host immune function and health, and therapeutic implications. J Gastroenterol, 49(5): 785-98.
  • Liu, Z., Li, N., & Neu, J. (2005). Tight junctions, leaky intestines, and pediatric diseases. Acta Paediatr, 94(4), 386-93.
  • Maukonen J, Saarela M. (2015). Human Gut microbiota:  Does diet matter? Proc Nutr Soc; 74(1): 23-36.
  • Saulnier MD, Kolida S, Gibson GR. (2009). Microbiology of the human intestinal tract and approaches for its dietary modulation. Curr Pharm Des; 15(13): 1403-14.
  • Simoes CD, Maukonen J, Kaprio J, Rissanen A, Poetiainen KH, Saarela M. (2013). Habitual dietary intake is associated with stool microbiota composition in monzygotic twins. J Nutr; 143(4): 417-23.
  • Tuohy KM, Gougolias C, Shen Q, Fava F, Ramnani P. (2009). Studying the human gut microbiota in the trans-omics era–focus on metagenomics and metabonomics. Curr Pham Des 15(13): 1415-27.
  • Wu GD, Chen J, Hoffmann C, Bittinger K, Chen YY, Keilbaugh SA … et al. (2011).  Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes. Science; 334(6052): 105-8.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3David Granet MD and Rob Knight PhD converse regarding the Microbiome. Some points by Knight:  Avoid fries and certain carbohydrates; but not all for fibers both soluble and insoluble are very important for microbiome health.  Also eat a rainbow of colored vegetables and fermented foods.
 

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