Dear Friends
Original Photo
Who proclaimed first that “All disease begins in the gut”? The first three that will answer correctly, or close enough, will receive the Original Synbiotic formula!

In this day and age medical science with its focus on the human GI tract microbiome and a whole food plant-based diet seems to be calling forth similar sentiments.

Dr. Francis Collins, director of NIH, in a talk entitled Supercharging Science for the Superorganism, said that we are a chimera-like creature, governed by our 10 trillion human cells and their 22,000 genes and the microbiome community in the GI tract — all 100 trillion of them with their 2 to 8 million genes (2015).

Possemier et al. (2010) has said it well when his team suggested we  consider the complex microbial ecosystem in our intestines as a separate organ within the body.

Martinez et al (2017) weighed in on this with their research paper entitled- Western diets, gut dysbiosis, and metabolic diseases: Are they linked? And indeed dysbiosis from Western diets is believed to be one of the reason obesity afflicts 36.5% of the US population and 600 million individuals world-wide.

The World Health Organization (WHO), Harvard Medical School, Kaiser Permantente, just to name a few, are all calling for a change of our dietary habits to one that focuses on a whole food plant based diet. Did you also know that probiotics love plants’ fiber and polyphenols? Plants are their most important source of food, and plants are also our most important source of foods.

See below in Green Facts the teaser on the new documentary by Cameron, The Game Changers.

At BioImmersions, we focus on probiotics,  plant polyphenols, fiber, and phytonutrients of eco-farmed or wildcrated whole foods. Our supplements are powerfully concentrated. We all recognize that it is difficult to change a diet that we are addicted to.  Here are two of our products that can make a big difference in the health of your gut microbiome, which translates to health in the whole body.

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily
Phyto Power Photo 6

  • Three species of Rosehip, wildcrafted, whole fruit and seeds (100% w/w), refractory dried, three Rosa species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Dandelion, wildcrafted, aerial parts (90% w/w), root (10% w/w) with flower, refractory dried, four Taraxacum species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Blueberry, wildcrafted, fruit (>90% w/w), leaves and stem (<5% w/w), refractory dried, four Vaccinium species, 100mg per capsule.

 

 

Original Synbiotic: 1 tsp. dailyOriginal Photo 4

20 billion cfu/tsp of certified strains of pedigreed probiotic with Therapeutic Foods in a synbiotic formula of L. acidophilus, B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus and 4 grams of inulin derived from organic chicory fiber. Advanced freeze-drying technology. 120 grams/bottle. 4 grams/ tsp. Dairy free.  Soy free. Gluten free. No excipients.


References


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The Game Changers- a teaser for this documentary by James Cameron
(http://gamechangersmovie.com/)

“What I discovered was so revolutionary, with such profound implications for performance, health, and the future of the planet itself, that I had to share it with the world.”  Quote from James Wilks

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved
Dear Friends

Did you know that polyphenols from berries and plants are the most favored foods for the probiotics genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the gut?

The berries and plants enhance the growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium inside the gut microbiome, while inhibiting many pathogenic organsims.

For example, Possemiers et al.’s (2011)  “The intestinal microbioime: a separate organ inside the body with the metabolic potential to influence the bioactivity of botanicals,” explains that rich polyphenolic molecules from berries and plants are broken down by probiotic organisms into many important sub-molecules that are more bioavailable yet still contain their classic polyphenolic structure to serve the body as antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, anti cancer, anti diabetes and more  … no wonder berries and plants are the preferred prebiotics foods for the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria!

 

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily
Phyto Power Photo 6

  • Three species of Rosehip, wildcrafted, whole fruit and seeds (100% w/w), refractory dried, three Rosa species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Dandelion, wildcrafted, aerial parts (90% w/w), root (10% w/w) with flower, refractory dried, four Taraxacum species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Blueberry, wildcrafted, fruit (>90% w/w), leaves and stem (<5% w/w), refractory dried, four Vaccinium species, 100mg per capsule.

 

 

Original Synbiotic: 1 tsp. dailyOriginal Photo 4

Contains:  20 billion cfu/tsp of certified strains of pedigreed probiotics (L. acidophilus,  B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and S. thermophilus) and 3.5 grams of inulin derived from organic chicory fiber.  Advanced freeze-drying technology.

120 grams/bottle. 4 grams/ tsp.  Dairy free.  Soy free. Gluten free. No excipients.

References

 

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Autism and Clostridia

February 24, 2018

Dear Friends

Research ascribes various etiologies to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  There are exogenous factors such as iatrogenic drugs, pollutants of various kinds, and over use of antibiotics; and there are the endogenous factors such as dysbiosis of the GI Tract, mitochondrial dysfunction, and of course genetics. Interestingly, genetic causation is found to be in the low percentile, whereas dybiosis and mitochondrial dysfunction conditions present major links to ASD.

Let’s focus on dysbiosis.  Overgrowth of clostridia, bacteriodes, and desulfovibrio are all ASD-associated bacterial populations. The overuse of antibiotics enables the clostridial family of bacteria to dominate because their spore forming ability resist many antibiotics and they can easily gain a foothold over good bacteria.

Clostridia is a big producer of the SCFA propionate. Too much propionate in the systemic circulation (which is able to cross the blood-brain barrier) becomes neurological and mitochondrial toxins, disrupting and causing the very symptoms that we see with autistic patients.

There is strong support in the literature for foundational probiotic organisms that reduce the overload of clostridium. These are the organisms we have chosen for our probiotics.

Research is showing that L. plantarum, L. casei rhamnosus, B. longum and even L. acidophilus can put out bacterocins against clostridia.  Doctors who have used our Original Synbiotic and our Supernatant Synbiotic (either one works) found improvement in the behaviors of ASD patients.

I would recommend adding Phyto Power for the high potency of polyphenolics grown in remote Alaskan regions. Phenols are shown in research as antimicrobials, inhibiting many pathogenic organisms including those implicated in ASD, yet at the same time, they enhance both the growth of the Bifido and Lactobacillus genera.

I suggest the following dosage:

Original Synbiotic: up to 1 tsp. daily. With very young patients start with an eight of a tsp and work up slowly adjusting the dosage. Back off just a little from a dosage that causes reaction. You be able to get up to a tsp dose in about a month of gradually ratcheting it up.

As a reminder this product contains L. plantarum, L. casei rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, B. longum and S. thermophiles plus organic chicory root inulin which is very bifido and lacto genic.  Each of the organism are good butyrate produces, and as we know, butyrate helps to heal a leaky gut which is a big problem for ASD patients.

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily (if they can’t take capsules then just open up the capsule and take the powder directly).

References

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Phenols and Oncogenes

February 19, 2018

Dear Friends

Phyto Power:  Supports DNA and cellular integrity during oncogenic treatment due to
its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.Phyto Power Photo 3

Food Science
  • DNA & Cellular Integrity: Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are shown in research to help maintain cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significant re-generative health benefits to the brain and nervous system (Jedrejek et al., 2017; Jiménez et al., 2016; Skrovankova et al., 2015; Joseph et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2013; Andersson et al., 2012; Chatterjee et al., 2011; Adams et al., 2010).*
  • Anti-Inflammation: García-Lafuente et al. (2009) conclude that flavonoids from berries and plants behave as anti-inflammatory agents in our body. Blueberries are rich with anthocyanins and a wide variety of phytochemicals that have been shown to effect neuro-regeneration in the brain (Albarracin et al., 2012).*
  • Energy & Weight-Loss: Dandelion is shown to have a great antioxidant activity (Hu et al., 2003), exhibiting diverse biological activities that promote energy, weight loss, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Jedrejek et al., 2017; González-Castejón et al., 2012; Jeon et al., 2008). The Rose hip has a rich phytochemical profile known for its antioxidant protection (Widen et al., 2012), supporting weight loss with a potential mechanism that decreases abdominal visceral fat (Nagatomo et al., 2015).*

Added Suggestion: Combine with the Original Synbiotic to bolster immune support. Add also the greenest food, Organic Chlorella, to support detox mechanism and immunity.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Albarracin, S.L., Stab, B., Casas, Z., Sutachan, J.J., Samudio, I., Gonzalez, J….Barreto, G.E. (2012). Effects of natural antioxidants in neurodegenerative disease. Nutr Neurosci, 15, 1-9. DOI: 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000028
  • Andersson, U., Berger, K., Hogberg, A., Landin-Olsson, M., & Holm, C. (2012). Effects of rose hip intake on risk markers of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over investigation in obese persons. Eur J Clin Nutr, 66, 585-590. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.203
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537-552. DOI: 10.1007/s00011-009-0037-3
  • Hu, C., & Kitts, D.D. (2003). Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, (1), 301-310.DOI: 10.1021/jf0258858
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82-88. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2007.09.006
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159136
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Liu, W., Lu, X., He, G., Gao, X., Xu, M., Zhang, J… Luo, C. (2013). Protective roles of Gadd45 and MDM2 in blueberry anthocyanins mediated DNA repair of fragmented and non-fragmented DNA damage in UV-irradiated HepG2 cells. Int Mol Sci, 14(11), 21447-62. DOI: 10.3390/ijms141121447
  • Nagatomo, A., Nishida, N., Fukuhara, I., Noro, A., Kozai, Y., Sato, H., & Matsuura, Y. (2015). Daily intake of rosehip extract decreases abdominal visceral fat in preobese subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes, 8, 147-156.DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S78623
  • Skrovankova, S., Sumczynski, D., Mlcek, J., Jurikova, T., Sochor, J.(2015). Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.Int J Mol Sci, 16(10), 24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673
  • Widen, C., Ekholm, A., Coleman, M.D., Renvert, S., Rumpunen, K. (2012). Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.) Oxid Med Cell Longev, 621579. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/621579 .

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Anti-carcinogenic Support

February 16, 2018

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                 Phyto Power High Rez 2

Phyto Power is formulated with several species of blueberry, rosehip, and dandelion, shown in research to support DNA and cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significantly to nerve re-generation.

Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are showing great potential in research on many different cancers, such as gastrointestinal tract (Bishayee et al., 2016), breast (Jeyabalan et al., 2014; Adams et al., 2010; Ries-Filho, 2008), brain (Cagle et al., 2012), breast and prostate (Sigsted et al., 2008), skin cancers (Chatterjee et al., 1011; Aggarwal et al., 2004), colon (Jiménez et al., 2016), and more.

Plant phenols have been researched for many years.  Johnson et al. (1994) found plants and their biologically active constituents contribute protective and anti-carcinogenic effects (see Table 1, p. 193).

More recently, Zhan et al. (2016) found that blueberries effect the migration, invasion, proliferation and cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Li et al. (2009), Seeram, (2008), and Serram et al. (2006) have researched different berries for many years to discover their effect on a variety of cancer cells. Yang & Li (2015) have shown that dandelion extract protects human skin fibroblast from UVB damage, while Sigstedt et al. (2008) studies dandelion leaves, flower and roots and their anti-carcinogenic effect on breast and prostate cancers. Rosehip is found to have antiproliferative and anti-oxidant effect (Jiménez et al., 2016), as well as reduce brain tumor proliferation and apoptosis (Cagle, 2012).

Phyto Power utilizes several varieties and the whole plants of blueberries, rosehips, and dandelions. Grown in remote regions of Alaska, these plants and berries are more powerful with high actives due to the pure, harsh and challenging environment of Alaska (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013; Dinstel et al., 2013).

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder! Take 1-2 capsules a day.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Aggarwal, B. B., Bhardwaj, A., Aggarwal, R. S., Seeram, N. P., Shishodia, S., & Takada, Y. (2004). Role of resveratrol in prevention and therapy of cancer: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer research, 24(5A), 2783-2840.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2014.982243
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 3(5), 13. . DOI:10.4236/jct.2012.35069
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi:10.1021/jf403810y . Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients?Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204. DOI: 10.1079/NRR19940011
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Li, L., Adams, L.S., Chen, S., Killan, C., Ahmed, A., & Seeram, N.P. (2009). Eugenia jambolana Lam. [purple berries] berry extract inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer but not non-tumorigenic breast cells. J Agric Food Chem, 57(3), 826-31. DOI: 10.1021/jf803407q
  • Seeram N.P. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5. DOI: 10.1021/jf072504n
  • Seeram, N.P., Adam, L.S., Zhang, Y., Lee, R., Sand, D., Scheuller, H.S., & Heber, D. (2006). Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. J Agric Food Chem, 54 (25), 9329-39.DOI: 10.1021/jf061750g
  • Sigstedt, S.C., Hooten, C.J., Callewaert, M.C., Jenkins, A.R., Romero, A.E., Pullin, M.J…. Steelant, W.F. (2008). Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 32(5), 1085-90. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.32.5.1085
  • Yang, Y., & Li, S. (2015). Dandelion extracts protect human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage and cellular senescence. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 619560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/619560
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. DOI: 10.1021/jf400823s
  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X, Liu, J., … Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.Biomed Rep, 5(5), 579-584. DOI: 10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Alaskan berries are known for their phenolic power:

Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188

In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and heart disease – conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska’s wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases.

Objective: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry.

Design: This research centred on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries – blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries – into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants.

Results: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.

Conclusion: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.

 

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved