Cruciferous Sprouts

Dear Friends

The most frightening fact about Coronary Heart Disease is that for the majority of Americans the first heart attack is sudden and unfortunately deadly (Myerburg, 2012).

How do we prevent and treat coronary heart disease? With the right foods.

The Therapeutic Food Protocol:

Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic– 1 heaping tbl twice daily (or two tbl once daily).
Phyto Power– 1 capsules daily
Garlic– 1 capsule daily
Cruciferous Sprouts– 2 capsules daily (preferably between meals).

It is well established in research that soluble beta glucan fibers in the diet will help in the lowering of LDL cholesterol. Two tablespoons of the Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic supplies enough beta glucans to significantly lower LDLs, and therefore to place the American Heart Association Seal for cardiovascular health on the label.

The pedigreed strains of probiotic bacteria utilized in the Beta Glucan Synbiotic reduce endotoxin producing bacteria in the gut, as well as, facilitate the tightening of the gut membrane so that endotoxins will not leak into the systemic circulation. Endotoxins can cause chronic systemic inflammation, which then causes a stiffening of the arteries (Erridge, 2011).

Food Science: Let’s discuss cholesterol, endotoxemia, and coronary heart disease.

There is a wide body of evidence that shows places in the world where heart disease is rare, due to dietary habits.

In the famous China Study, researchers investigated the eating habits and incidence of chronic disease among hundreds of thousands of rural Chinese.  In the Guizhou province, a region with half a million people, not a single death could be attributed to coronary artery disease among men under 65 over the course of three years (Campbell et al., 1998).

In Uganda, a country of millions in East Africa, coronary heart disease was described as “almost non-existent (Shaper, 1959). The researchers found that out of 632 people autopsied in St. Louis, Missouri, 136 had died of heart attacks, compared to the East African cohort where out of 632 people autopsied in Uganda only 1 was from a heart attack.

The almost non-existent cases of heart disease among rural Chinese and Africans was attributed to their amazingly low levels of cholesterol, averaging under 150 mg/dL.  Their diets were both centered on plant-based foods, such as grains and vegetables (De Biase, 2007).

Dietary choices at any age may prevent, stop, and even reverse heart disease before it’s too late.

William C. Roberts, editor in chief of the American Journal of Cardiology, states that the only critical risk factor for atherosclerotic plaque buildup is cholesterol, specifically elevated LDL cholesterol in your blood.  It is called bad cholesterol because it’s the vehicle by which cholesterol is deposited into our arteries.  According to Roberts, the optimal LDL cholesterol level is probably 50 to 70 mg/dL.  The population target should therefore be around a total cholesterol level under 150 mg/dL  (Benjamin, 2013).

To drastically reduce LDL cholesterol levels, you need to drastically reduce your intake of three things:  trans fat, which comes from processed foods and naturally from meat and dairy; saturated fat, found mainly in animal products and junk foods; and to a lesser extent dietary cholesterol, found exclusively in animal derived foods, especially eggs (Trumbo, 2011).

Nathan Pritikin, Dean Ornish, and Caldwell Esselstyn, all pioneers in the plant based diet, separately, within their own research, took patients with advance heart disease, and put them on the kind of diet followed by the African and Asians population sited above, and their patients got better— as their LDL cholesterol levels dramatically decreased, so too did the plaque in their arteries, resulting in improved circulation to their heart (Esslestyn, 2010).

Endotoxemia:  A single fast food meal of sausage and egg McMuffins can stiffen your arteries within hours, and this reduced elasticity will last for around 5 hours.  Eating these kinds of meat and fat laden foods daily shifts the gut microflora toward endotoxic producing bacteria, and when these kind of bacteria (or their cell wall parts, such as LPSs) enter into circulation, our immune system reacts causing the stiffening of arteries (Vogel, 1997).  Cardiac patients can experience relief [from angina] when placed on a diet composed primarily of plant foods (Ornish, 1998).

Note: This week I focused on the Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic, and its relevance in lowering cholesterol and reducing endotoxemia.  In subsequent emails we will focus on the other three products.

Bibliography:

  • Benjamin MM., & Roberts. WC. (2013). Facts and principles learned at the 19th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent); 26(2): 124-36.
  • Campbell et al. (1998). Diet, lifestyle, and the etiology of coronary artery disease: the Cornell China Study. Am J Cardio; 82(108): 18T-21T.
  • De Biase et al. (2007). Vegetarian diet and cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Arq. Bras Cardiol; 88(1): 35-9.
  • Erridge, C. (2011). The capacity of foodstuffs to induce innate immune activation of human monocytes in vitro is dependent on food content of stimulants of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. Br J Nutr; 105(1): 15-23.
  • Esslestyn, C.B. (2010). Is the present therapy for coronary artery disease the radical mastectomy of the twenty-first century? Am J Cardiol; 106(6): 902-4.
  • Myerburg, R.J., & Junttila M.J. (2012). Sudden cardiac death cause by coronary heart disease. Circulation 28; 125 (8): 1043-52.
  • Ornish et al. (1998). Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal of coronary heart disease. JAMA; 280(23): 2001-7.
  • Shaper A.G., & Jones K.W. (1959). Serum-cholesterol, diet, and coronary heart disease in Africans, and Asians in Uganda. Int J Epidemiol; 41(5): 1221-5.
  • Trumbo, P.R., & Shimakawa T. (2011). Tolerable upper intake levels for trans fats, saturated fat, and cholesterol. Nutr Res; 69(5): 270-5.
  • Vogel et al. (1997). Effect of a single high-fat meal on endothelial function in healthy subjects. Am J Cardiol; 79(3): 350-4.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Dear Friends

The University of Hawaii Cancer Center assessed that nearly every person in Hawaii will face a diagnosis of cancer either personally or within their family at some point in their life, so says (Hawaii Cancer Facts & Figures, 2010).

The Center’s Mission is to create a world where cancer no longer exists.

Cancer is basically a non-communicable life style disease, and diet is a huge component.  How then can Therapeutic Food supplements help in the prevention cancer?


Therapeutic Foods are plant based supplements. Here is a protocol based on recent studies to support the prevention of cancer

Food Science

Epidemiological studies have consistently linked abundant consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduction of the risk of developing several types of cancer (Boivin et al., 2009).

Boivin et al., (2009) evaluated the inhibitory effects of extracts isolated from 34 vegetables on the proliferation of 8 different tumor cell lines: breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and stomach cancer.

The best by far were vegetables from the Allium (particularly garlic) and the Cruciferous (particularly broccoli) families—inhibiting these cancers almost 100%. The researchers concluded, “The inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary based cancer-preventative strategies.”

Berry fruits have beneficial effects against several types of human cancers; and the evidence is overwhelming.  Their benefits are as follows:

  • Counteract, reduce and repair damage from oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • Regulating carcinogen and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, transcription and growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, and cellular signaling pathways of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis.
  • Sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance.
  • Provide protection from therapy-associated toxicities.

These anticancer potential benefits are related to their polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, gallotannis, phenolic acids), stilbenoids, lignans and triterpennoids (Seeram NP., 2008).

It is well established that glucans enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer and anti-infection immunotherapy, both in clinical and experimental conditions (Vetvocia V., 2013).

Beta-glucans, naturally occurring polysaccharides, are present as constituents of cell wall of cereal grains, mushrooms, algae, or microbes including bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Since Pillemer et al. first prepared and investigated zymosan in the 1940s and others followed with the investigation in the 60s and 70s, researchers have well established the significant role of B-glucans on the immune system relative to cancer treament, infection, immunity, and restoration of damaged bone marrow (Yoon TJ., 2013).

The good news is that these plant based foods are shown in many studies to help in the prevention of cancer, and at the same time, help to prevent heart disease and diabetes.

Bibliography:

  • Basu A. Lyons TJ. (2012). Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in the metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives. J Agric Food Chem; 60: 5687-92.
  • Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
  • Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health;72 doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • Seeram NP. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5.
  • Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.
  • Vetvocla  V. (2013). Synthetic oligossacharides: clinical application in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Md Chem; 13(5): 720-4.
  • Yoon et al. 2013. The effects of B-glucans on cancer metastasis. Anticancer Agents Med Chem; 13(5): 699-708.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3VERGE Sep 19-22, 2016 Santa Clara, CA

VERGE Summits are invitation-only, half-day working sessions exploring pressing issues at the intersection of technology and sustainability for companies, governments, utilities and innovators.

Cancer Support

February 18, 2016

Dear Friends

The American Institute for Cancer Research has their Ten Recommendations for Cancer Prevention, and most of them center around the foods choices we make. Of course, there’s the daily exercise routine, and the goal of being as lean as possible without becoming underweight; but most all of the others have to do with what we put in our mouth.

Therapeutic Food Supplements provide intelligent support for cancer prevention.

A Therapeutic Food protocol to support our ability to prevent and aid in treating cancer:

  • Garlic, organic– 1 to 2 capsules daily (more is okay, but not enough so that your skin has a garlic odor)
  • Cruciferous Sprout Complex 3-4 capsules daily, preferably on an empty stomach
  • Phyto Power, wild crafted– 1-2 capsules daily
  • Beta Glucan High Potency Symbiotic– 2 tablespoons daily
  • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic– 2-4capsules daily

 

Food Science:

Epidemiological studies have consistently linked abundant consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduction of the risk of developing several types of cancer. Boivin et al., (2009) evaluated the inhibitory effects of extracts isolated from 34 vegetables on the proliferation of 8 different tumor cell lines: breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and stomach cancer.

The best by far were vegetables from the Allium (particularly garlic) and the Cruciferous (particularly broccoli) families—inhibiting these cancers almost 100%. The researchers concluded, “The inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary based chemo-preventative strategies.”

Garlic, Organic Freeze Dried– each capsule contains 4 to 5 cloves of raw high active’s (alliin and alliinase) garlic.

Garlic contains phytoalexins that have been shown to induce apoptosis and target transcription factors, cell cycle checkpoints, and cell invasion. Garlic improves phase 2 detoxification pathways. Garlic contains allyl sulfides compounds that show anti-proliferative effects on tumor cells as well as aiding in detoxification. Garlic also contains natural organosulfur compounds (OSCs) that have been shown to have chemo-preventive effects and to suppress the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro through the induction of apoptosis (Cao et al., 2014; Romagnolo et al., 2012; Nepravishta et al., 2012; Melino et al., 2011)

Cruciferous Sprout Complex contains broccoli sprouts, daikon radish sprouts, red radish sprouts, watercress sprouts, kale sprouts, mustard sprouts and cabbage sprouts; all together containing high levels of not only glucosinolates, but also high levels of myrosinase (from red radish)—the enzyme necessary for high production of sulforaphanes.

Cruciferous Sprouts are an exceedingly rich source of glucosinolates and isothiocyanates that through their breakdown products induce phase 2 detoxication enzymes, boost antioxidant status, and protect animals against chemically induced cancer formation. They are among the most promising chemopreventive dietary constituents. They appear most closely associated with reduce cancer risk in organis such as the colorectum, lung, prostate and breast. (Abdull Razis & Noor., 2013; Steinkeller et al., 2001).

We will cover Phyto Power, Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic and Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic in next week’s Forward Thinking.

Bibliography:

Abdull Razis AF, Noor NM. (2013). Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev;14(3):1565-70.
Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
Melino S., Sabelli R, Paci M. (2011). Allyl sulfur compounds and cellular detoxification system: effects and perspectives in cancer therapy. Amino Acids;41(1):103-12.
Nepravishta et al. (2012). Oxidative species and s-glutathionyl conjugates in the apoptosis induction by allyl thiosulfate. FEBS J; 279(1): 154-67.
Romagnolo DF, Davis CD, Milner JA. (2012). Phytoalexins in cancer prevention. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed); 17: 2035-58.
Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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February is Cancer Prevention Month and The American Institute for Cancer Research provides a great website for support in the fight against cancer.  Check our their site and these ten recommendations for cancer prevention.

Cancer Support (continued)

February 17, 2016

Dear Friends

In this weeks Forward Thinking we will continue with our cancer support protocol focusing on Phyto Power and Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic.

Last week we looked at vegetables, and research siting their most potent anti-cancer fighters. This week we are getting into the intelligent use of fruits, fibers and probiotics for preventive cancer support.

(more…)

Fatty Liver

February 9, 2016

Dear Friends

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by excessive lipid accumulation in the liver, is the hepatic manifestation of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Due to the epidemics of obesity, NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading cause of altered liver enzymes in Western countries (Blachier et al., 2004).   A fatty liver may lead to a fatty pancreas which leads to diabetes (Lichtenstein, Schwab., 2000).

Valenti et al. (2013) explain how steatosis (fatty liver) may be associated with oxidative hepatocellular damage, inflammation, and activation of fibrogenesis, defining nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).  And, NASH is potentially a progressive liver disease leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Therapeutic Foods support for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease:
Fatty Liver Protocol 3

  • Blueberry Extract– one daily
  • Phyto Power– two daily
  • Cruciferous Sprouts Complex– two daily
  • Original Synbiotic– one tsp. daily

Food Science:

Anthocyanins decrease hepatic lipid accumulation and counteract oxidative stress and hepatic inflammation (Valenti, 2013; Zhu  et al., 2012; Guo et al., 2011).

Blueberry Extract contains pure anthocyanin extract from Vaccinium corymbosum– a North American blueberry cultivar with an exception broad spectrum of anthocyanins.  It takes us 80 pounds of blueberries to get one pound of this precious extract.

Phyto Power contains four species of wild-crafted Alaskan blueberries (the whole berry), with an exceptionally high concentration of anthocyanins. Plus, it contains the flavonoids of three species of whole wild-crafted rose hips (including seeds) and four species of wild-crafted Alaskan dandelion (including roots, leaves and flowers).  The roots increase liver bile flow.

Dietary supplementation with broccoli sprout extract containing sulforaphane precursor glucoraphanin is likely to be highly effective in improving liver function through reduction of oxidative stress (Kikuchi, 2015).

Cruciferous Sprouts Complex contains broccoli sprouts, daikon radish sprouts, red radish sprouts, water cress sprouts, kale sprouts, mustard sprouts and cabbage sprouts; all together containing high levels of not only glucosinolates, but also high levels of myrosinase (from red radish), the enzymes necessary for high production of sulforaphanes.

The effects of probiotics and prebiotics have proven to be beneficial in NAFLD (Iacono, 2010; Yadav, 2007).

The Original Synbiotic contains 5 pedigreed strains of L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus and B. longum, plus inulin derived from organic chicory root.

Inulin is very bifidogenic, enhancing the growth of Lactobacillus as well.  These good bacterial produce copious amounts of butyrate upon the fermentation of inulin which facilitate the tightening of gut epithelial cell junctions—reducing leaky gut syndrome.  Delzenne and Kok (1999) demonstrated that FOS, modifying the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes, reduced the de novo liver fatty acid synthesis.

Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced liver oxidative stress and improved insulin resistance (Yadav et al., 2007).  Lactobacillus plantarum reduced liver  and serum cholesterol and triglycerides (Wang et al., 2009).  Lactobacillus rhamnosus reduced hepatic steatosis (Lee 2006).

Bibliography:

  • Blachier et al. (2004). The burden of liver disease in Europe: a review of available epidemiological data. Journal of Hepatology; 58(3): 593-608.
  • Browning et al. (2004). Prevalence of hepatic steatosis in an urban population in the United States: impact of ethnicity. Hepatology; 40(6): 1387-1395.
  • Delzenne NM, Kok NN. (1999). Biochemical basis of oligofructose3-induced hypolipidemia in animal models. J Nutr; 129: 1467S-1470S.
  • Guo et al. (2011). Anthocyanin inhibits high glucose-induced hepatic mtGRAT1 activation and prevents fatty acid synthesis through PKC. Journal of Lipid Research;52(5): 908-922.
  • Iacono et al. (2010). Probiotics as an emerging therapeutic strategy to treat NAFLD: focus on molecular and biochemical mechanisms. JNB; 22(8): 699-711.
  • Johnson-Henry et al. (2008). Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG prevents enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli 0157:H7- Induced changes in epithelial barrier function. Infect Immun; 76:1340-1348.
  • Kikuchi et al. (2015). Sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extract improves hepatic abnormalities in male subjects. World J Gastroenterol; 21(43): 12457-12467.
  • Lee et al. (2006). Human originated bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus PL60, produce conjugated linoleic acid and show anti-obesity effects in diet-induced obese mice. Biochim Biophys Acta; 1761: 736-744.
  • Lichtenstein AH, Schwab US. (2000). Relationship of dietary fat to glucose metabolism. Atherosclerosis; 150(2): 227-243.
  • Valenti et al. (2013). Dietary Anthocyanins as Nutritional Therapy for Non alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity; Volume 2013:Article ID 145421.
  • Vendrame et al. (2013a). Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium)-enriched diet improves dyslipidaemia and modulates the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in obese Zucker rats. British Journal of Nutrition; 111(2): 194-200.
  • Wang et al. (2009). Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 isolated from Tibet kefir on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora of rats fed on high-cholesterol diet. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol; 84: 341-347.
  • Yadav et al. (2007). Antidiabetic effect of probiotic dahl containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei in high fructose fed rats. Nutrition; 23: 62-68.
  • Zhu et al. (2012). The anthocyanin cyaniding-3-O-beta-glucoside, a flavonoid, increases hepatic glutathione synthesis and protects hepatocytes against reactive oxygen species during hyperglycemia: involvement of a cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling pathway. Free Radical Biology and Medicine; 52(2): 314-327.

Yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please  use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Michael Gregor in his educational series shows how saturated fat in the diet causes insulin resistance which leads to fatty muscles leading to fatty liver leading to fatty pancreas leading to diabetes: What Causes Insulin Resistance? and Diabetes as a Disease of Fat Toxicity.