Blueberry Extract

Nerve Regeneration

October 6, 2017

Dear Friends

By 2029, more than 20 precent of the total U.S. population will be over the age of 65 (US Census, 2012). By 2050, 30% of the total population in the U.S. will be over 65 years of age. As our aging population expands we see more age-related health disorders, which means we must find measures to prevent or even reverse age-related health disorders (Joseph et al., 2009).

Research has recently shown that consumption of berry fruit, and in particular blueberry, can dramatically impact the aging brain, possibly leading to improved cognition and motor abilities (Joseph et al., 2009).

As you can see both of my above citings come from James Joseph who was for several decades the lead scientist and lab chief for the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.

It was Dr. Joseph’s research and that of his colleagues who demonstrated that blueberries and blueberry extract reverse and prevent brain aging (Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008; 2007), improve memory and motor skills (Carey et al., 2014; Malin et al., 2011; Brewer et al., 2010), repair neuronal tissue and function (Joseph et al., 2003; Miller et al., 2012), and serve as a potent anti-aging food (Joseph et al., 1999; 2009; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2015; 2012).
Blueberry Extract
Our Blueberry Extract was designed with Dr. Joseph’s help.  He helped me to convert his work to human consumption.  It is the most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

Suggest dose is one capsule a day or as directed by your physician.

References:

  • Brewer, G.J., Torricelli, J.R., Lindsey, A.L., Kunz, E.Z., Neuman, A., Fisher, D.R., & Joseph, J.A. (2010). Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract. J Nutr Biochem, 21, 991-998. DOI: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2009.08.005
  • Carey, A.N., Gomes, S.M., & Shukitt-Hale, B. (2014). Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet. J Agric Food Chem, 62, 3972-3978. DOI: 10.1021/jf404565s
  • Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009
  • Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6 (3), 153-162. DOI:
  • Malin, D.H., Lee, D.R., Goyarzum P., Chang, Y.H., Ennis, L.J., Beckett, E., Shukitt-Hale, B., Joseph, J.A. (2011). Short-term blueberry-enriched diet prevents and reverses object recognition memory loss in aging rats. Nutrition, 27, 338-342. DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2010.05.001
  • Shukitt-Hale, B., Lau, F.C., Joseph, J.A. (2008). Berry fruit supplementation and the aging brain. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 56, 636–641. DOI10.1021/jf072505f

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Note:  We are gradually changing all our labels as you can see if you click here on the Supernatant and High ORAC Synbiotics links.  The new label for the Blueberry Extract will have a subtitle and read: Blueberry Extract- Cognitive and Nerve Regeneration. 
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
Blueberry Extract
Blueberries support cognition and memory. More impressively, blueberries regenerate nerves which is the reason scientists describe blueberries and blueberry extracts as agents of neuro-regeneration.

The many research studies of James Joseph and Barbara Shukitt-Hale have aptly demonstrated the use and application of blueberries as a potential therapeutic agents for reversing and preventing brain aging. Below are a few of their articles.

Learn how to use bluebrries in our research and description tabs.

(Blueberry Extract- the most powerful blueberry extract on the market)

References:

  • Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009
  • Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale, B., & Lau, F.C. (2007). Fruit polyphenols and their effects on neuronal signaling and behavior in senescence . Ann NY Acd Sci, 1100, 470-85. DOI: 10.1196/annals.1395.052
  • Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6 (3), 153-162. DOI:10.1080/1028415031000111282
  • Shukitt-Hale, B. (2012). Blueberries and neuronal aging.Gerontology, 58, 518-523. DOI: 10.1159/000341101

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.
Green Facts:

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©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
Blueberry Extract 4

The most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

Scientists describe blueberries as agents of neuro-regeneration. Research studies show that blueberry and blueberry extract offer a potent and effective brain food to support cognition, memory, and the general health of our nervous system.

The Blueberry Extract is Vegan, Kosher, Non GMO, and Gluten Free.

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cognitive Support.

Food Science

The Blueberry Extract offers the highest concentration of the North American blueberry species, Vaccinium corymbosum, with a significant broad-spectrum phenolic profile.

The Blueberry Extract is a powerful concentration of anthocyanins: It takes eighty pounds of blueberries to get one pound of the pure purple extract. This means that one capsule of the extract is equivalent to a cup and a quarter of whole blueberries.

Each vegan capsule has 500mg of the pure extract, without any excipients or fillers.

Tuft University’s James Joseph and Barbara Shukitt-Hale have researched the use and application of blueberries as potential therapeutic agents for many years. Their studies along with their colleagues demonstrate that blueberries and blueberry extract reverse and prevent brain aging (Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008; 2007) improve memory and motor skills (Carey et al., 2014; Malin et al., 2011; Brewer et al., 2010), repair neuronal tissue and function (Joseph et al., 2003; Miller et al., 2012) and serve as a potent anti-aging food (Joseph et al., 1999; 2009; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2015; 2012).

The Blueberry Extract was designed with Dr. Joseph assistance by converting some of the data from his research to human consumption.

Steward, Sridhar, and Meyer (2013) define regeneration of the nerves as a process of repairing or replacing nerve cells that have been damaged. Studies have hypothesized that an antioxidant-enriched diet may affect neuro-regeneration and inhibit inflammation (Szajdek & Borowska, 2008; Sweeney et al., 2002) due to their high anthocyanins.

Research studies and reviews by Latif (2015), Panickar & Anderson (2010), Subash et al. (2014), Panickar (2013), Schaffer et al. (2006), and Letenneur et al. (2007), demonstrate the great ability of flavonoids to offer a consistent neuro-protective nutraceuticals.

Stratheam et al. (2014) demonstrate that anthocyanin rich extracts of blueberries and grape seed* support the process of neuro regeneration by interfering with the neurotoxin, rotenone and improving the mitochondrial function. Gao et al. (2012) find that a habitual intake of dietary flavonoids is associated with a lower risk of developing neurological issues such as Parkinson, or lessening brain edema (Panickar & Anderson, 2010). Kovacsova et al. (2010) researched the biochemical pathways and molecular neuro-protective mechanisms of polyphenols in the brain. Antioxidant activity reduces neuro-inflammation and supports the prevention of neuro-degenerative (Stromberg et al., 2005). Williams & Spencer (2012) and Galli et al. (2006) show that a blueberry-supplemented diet reverses age-related declines with improved cognition and nerve regeneration.

The process of neurological regenerative ability of blueberries is linked to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of blueberries (Subash et al., 2014; Duffy et al., 2008; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008), effecting the reduction of NF Kappa beta, Cox-2 and Isoprostane (Youdim et al., 2002). For this reason, studies emphasize the important dietary role of blueberries with anthocyanins ability to reduce oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory cytokines (McAnulty et al., 2011).

Due to their high levels of anthocyanins, blueberries are also shown in research to contribute to heart health (McAnulty, 2014; Louis et al., 2014; Erlund et al., 2008; Youdim & Joseph, 2001).

How available are these anthocyanins? Mazza et al. (2002) has demonstrated that consumption of blueberries raises blood serum ORAC (antioxidant capacity). Emerging evidence confirms the ability of the human body to absorb anthocyanins, demonstrating a greater bioavailability (Bell et al., 2015), prolonged circulation, and relatively high concentration of anthocyanins metabolites (Lila et al., 2016).

See the Research tab for additional bibliography to further understand the application and use of blueberry and blueberry extract.
* See High ORAC Synbiotic Formula

References

Erlund, I., Koli, R., Alfthan, G., Marniemi, J., Puukka, P., Mustonen, P… Jula, A. (2008). Favorable effects of berry consumption on platelet function, blood pressure, and HDL cholesterol. Am J Clin Nutr 87, 323-331. Article

Galli, R.L., Bielinski, D.F., Szprengiel, A., Shukitt-Hale, B., Joseph, J.A. (2006). Blueberry supplemented diet reverses age-related decline in hippocampal HSP70 neuroprotection. Neurobio Aging, 27, 344-350. DOI:
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2005.01.017

Gao, X., Cassidy, A., Schwarzschild, M.A., Rimm, E.B., & Ascherio, A. (2012). Habitual intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of Parkinson disease. Neurology, 78(10), 1138-45. doi:  10.1212/WNL.0b013e31824f7fc4

Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009

Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale, B., & Lau, F.C. (2007). Fruit polyphenols and their effects on neuronal signaling and behavior in senescence. Ann NY Acd Sci, 1100, 470-85. DOI:10.1196/annals.1395.052

Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6 (3), 153-162. DOI:
10.1080/1028415031000111282

Joseph, J.A., Shukitt-Hale, B., Denisova, N.A., Bielinski, D., Martin, A., McEwen, J.J., & Bickford, P.C. (1999). Reversals of age-related declines in neuronal signal

Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009

Kovacsova, M., Barta, A., Parohova, J., Vrankova, S., Pechanova, O. (2010). Neuroprotective mechanisms of natural polyphenolic compounds. Act Nerv Super Rediviva, 52, 181-186. Abstract

Latif, R. (2015). Flavonoids as novel neuroprotective nutraceuticals. Saudi J Health Sci, 4, 1-4. DOI:10.4103/2278-0521.151402

McAnulty, L.S., Nieman, D.C., Dumke, C.L., Shooter, D.A., Henson, D.A., Utter, A.C., … McAnulty, S.R. (2011). Effect of blueberry ingestion on natural killer cell counts, oxidative stress, and inflammation prior to and after 2.5 h of running. Appl Physio Nutr Metab, 36(6), 976-84. DOI:10.1139/h11-120

Panickar, K.S., & Jang, S. (2013). Dietary and plant polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects and improve cognitive function in cerebral ischemia. Recent Pat Food Nutr Agric, 5(2), 128-43. DOI: 10.2174/1876142911305020003
Schaffer, S., Eckert, G.P., Schmitt-Schilling, S., & Muller, W.E. (2006). Plant foods and brain aging: a critical appraisal. Forum Nutr, 59, 86-115. DOI:10.1159/000095209

Shukitt-Hale, B., Bielinski, D.F., Lau, F.C., Willis, L.M., Carey, A.N., & Joseph, J.A. (2015). The beneficial effects of berries on cognition, motor behaviour and neuronal function in ageing. Br J Nutr, 114(10), 1542-9. DOI:10.1017/S0007114515003451

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.
Green Facts:

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Neuro-regeneration

April 9, 2017

Dear Friends,

Cognitive decline, memory loss, and foggy thinking are on the rise and do not automatically accompany old age but affect all ages (Joseph, 2009).

Plant polyphenols and a healthy microbiome in the GI tract have shown to strongly support a healthy functioning nervous system, regenerate nerve tissue and protect against the onset of neuro-degenerative decline (Brewer et al., 2010; Burokas et al., 2015).

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cognitive Support.

Food Science

A declining nervous system leads to the problematic onset of neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s).  Protecting against this decline, berry fruit polyphenols were examined, and in particular, blueberry extract anthocyanins for their multiplicity of actions that goes beyond the established antioxidant ability (Galli et al., 2002). The other possible mechanisms for the berry’s positive effects include: direct effects on signaling to enhance neuronal communication (Joseph et al., 2003), the ability to buffer against excess calcium (Joseph et al., 2004), enhancement of neuroprotective stress shock proteins (Galli et al., 2006), and reduction of stress signals such as nuclear factor B (NF-B) (Goyarzu et al., 2004).  Additionally, the anthocyanins contained in blueberries have been shown to enter the brain, and their concentrations were correlated with cognitive performance (Andres-Lacueva et al., 2005).

The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract. Regulation of the microbiota-brain-gut axis is essential for maintaining homeostasis, including that of the CNS. It is clear that the gut microbiota can be a key regulator of mood, cognition, pain, and obesity (Burokas et al., 2015; Borre et al., 2014).

Bibliography

  • Andres-Lacueva, C., Shukitt-Hale, B., Galli RL., Jauregui O., Lamuela-Reventos, RM., Joseph, J. (2005). Anthocyanins in aged blueberry-fed rats are found centrally and may enhance memory. Nutr Neurosci; 8:111-120.
  • Borre, Y.E., Moloney, R.D., Clarke, G., Dinana, T.G., Cryan, J.F. (2014). The impact of microbiota on brain and behavior: mechanisms & therapeutic potential. Adv Exp Med Biol, 817, 373-403.
  • Brewer, G.J., Torricelli, J.R., Lindsey, A.L., Kunz, E.Z., Neuman, A., Fisher, D.R., & Joseph, J.A. (2010). Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract. J Nutr Biochem, 21, 991-998.
  • Burokas, A., Moloney, RD., Dinan, TG., Cryan, JF. (2015). Microbiotia regulation of the Mammalian gut-brain axis. Adv Appl Microbiol; 91(1): 1-62.
  • Galli, R.L., Shukitt-Hale, B., Youdim, K.A.. Joseph, J.A. (2002). Fruit polyphenolics and brain aging:  nutritional interventions targeting age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits. Ann NY Acad Sci; 959: 128-32.
  • Galli,RL., Bielinski, DF., Szprengiel, A., Shukitt-Ale, B., Joseph, J. (2006). Blueberry supplemented diet reverses age-related decline in hippocampal HSP70 neuroprotection.  Neurobiol Aging; 27:344-350.
  • Goyarzu, P., Malin, DH., Lau FC., Taglialatela, G. Moon, WD., Jennings, R., Moy, E., et al. (2004).  Blueberry supplemented diet: effects on object recognition memory and nuclear factor kappa B levels in aged rats. Nutr Neurosci: 7:75-83.
  • Joseph, J., Denisova, NA., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003).  Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci 6:153-162.
  • Joseph, J., Fisher, D.R., Carey, AN. (2004). Fruit extracts antagonize Abeta- or DA- induced deficits in Ca2++ flux in M1-transfect COS-7 cells. J Alzheimers Dis; 6:403;discussion 443-9.
  • Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J Neurosci; 29(41): 12795-801.
  • Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6, 153-162.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Recent clincial research has demonstrated that berry fruits can prevent age-related neurodegenerative diseases and improve motor and cognitive functions.

Regular flavonoid rich fruit intake is associated with delayed Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, ischemic diseases and aging effects (Subash, 2014).

Therapeutic Food recipe to support motor and cognitive function:

Food Science

The berry fruits are not only powerful broad spectrum antioxidants, but also are hormetic by nature (hormone like), capable of modulating metabolic and signaling pathways involved in inflammantory reactions, cell survival, neurotransmission and enhancing neuroplasticity.

Blueberry Extract contains pure anthocyanin extract from Vaccinium corymbosum– a  North American blueberry cultivar with an exceptionally broad spectrum of anthocyanins.  It takes us 80 pounds of blueberries to get one pound of this precious and very potent extract.

Blueberries are rich in phytochemicals such as anthocyanin, chlorogenic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol, and tannins.  Chlorogenic acid for example crosses the blood-brain barrier and through hydrolysis converts to caffeic acid, the most potent of all antioxidants for neutralizings the fires of oxidations in the brain.

Phyto Power contains three species of wildcrafted Alaskan Rosehips (the whole fruit and seeds), four species of wildcrafted dandelions (aerial parts 90% w/w, roots 10% w/w and flower), and four species of wildcrafted blueberry (fruit >95% w/w and leave and stems < 5% w/w).

Cerebral deposition of amyloid B-peptide in the brain is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s Disease.  A consistent protective effect of polyphenols consumption on AD has been documented by epidemiological studies (Ono, 2003).  The polyphenolics involved where myricetin, morin, quercetin, kaempferol, catechin and epicatechins—all which are the high actives in Phyto Power‘s rose hips, blueberries, and dandelion.

Akiyama et al. (2000) looked at how inflammation fits into the overall framework of AD pathology and determined that virtually all the cytokines and chemokines that have been studied in AD including IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-8, COX-2, etc. are up-regulated in AD; and that AD patients should significantly benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment.

Read more on AD and Phyto Power support by clicking on the link above.

High ORAC Synbiotic contains 20 billion of probiotic (L. acidophilus, B.longum) plus blueberry extract, grape and grape seed extract, raspberry and raspberry seed extract, cranberry, strawberry, prune, tart cherry and wild bilberry extract plus 250mg inulin.

The gut has been called the second brain for a good reason.  With a population of 100 million nerves in the enteric nervous system, there is more neuronal tissue in the gut than in the spinal cord.  The digestive tract is the Port of Entry into our body via the food we put into our mouth. The gut has 100 trillion luminal microbes, and hence, it is the frontline of our body’s communication with the outside world.  The commensal gut microbiota influences systemic immune response, with recent research showing a causive effect on various neural tissues. Much literature is now focused on the connection between microbiota and pain and cognition, illnesses such as MS, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease (Catanzaro, et al., 2015). High ORAC Synbiotic supports the health of microbiota. Read more by clicking on the link above.

Bibliography

  • Akiyama et al. (2000). Inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging; 21(3): 383-421.
  • Carey et al. (2014). Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet. J Agric Food Chem; 62: 3972-3978.
  • Catanzaro et al. (2015). The gut microbiota and its correlations with the central nervous system disorders. Panminerva Med; 57(3): 127-43.
  • Ono et al. (2003). Potent Anti-amyloidogenic and fibril-destabilizing effects of polyphenols in vitro: Implications for the prevention and therapeutics of Alzheimer’s isease. J Neurochem; 87: 172-181
  • Stratheam et al. (2014). Neuroprotective effects of anthocyanin-and proanthocyanidin-rich extracts in cellular models of Parkinson’s diseases. Brian Res; 1555: 60-77.
  • Subash et al. (2014). Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases.  Neural Regeneration Research; 9(16): 1557-1566.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Maintaining a good relationship with Mother Nature is crucial to our health, and our very survival as we are all inextricably tied together.  I love the Global Oneness Project as it invites us back into a healthy relationship with her.  Just click on any of their amazing and enlightened videos and essays.