Protocols for Health

Living Well, Dying Well

September 17, 2018
Dear Friends

We are happy to share with you the Fielding University Press publication of a new book by Dr. Judith Stevens-Long and our BioImmersion’s president, Dr. Dohrea Bardell: Living Well, Dying Well:  A practical guide to choices, costs, and consequences.Living Well Dying Well

  • Attitudes to death and dying are changing in the United States. Today, we are living longer, yet with the acute awareness
    that what we do now will affect our remaining time.
  • Prompted by a big push from baby boomers, our society is moving towards a culture that provides a greater array of positive choices in the final phase of our lives.
  • This should inspire all of us to find new ways to create joy and comfort until the very last moment of life.
  • Written by Social Sciences Professor Dr. Judy Stevens-Long, author of the bestselling book Adult Life, with Dr. Dohrea Bardell, a Fellow at the Institute for Social Innovation, this book contains all the information you need to ensure that the last years of your life, or the life of someone you love, will be as satisfying, comfortable, and as productive as possible.

You can find the book on Amazon: click here.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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We are proud to announce the Fielding University Press publication of Living Well, Dying Well by our very own Judy Stevens-Long, written with Fielding alumna Dohrea Bardell.

The book is one of the first to document how attitudes to death and dying are changing in North America. Now that we are living longer, it is increasingly common for people to have a frank conversation about their end-of-life wishes with partners and loved ones.

Judy and Dohrea set out to support and encourage that conversation with a wealth of information about end-of-life choices, hospice care, legal and financial issues, and beliefs in the afterlife, as well as wellness strategies that can fill the final phase of our lives with joy and comfort.

Written for both an academic as well as a general trade audience, Living Well, Dying Well: A practical guide to choices, costs, and consequences is now available worldwide from Amazon by clicking this link.

Please join us in congratulating Judy and Dohrea with the publication of this groundbreaking book—and please spread the word in your community of practice.

Kind regards,

Monique Snowden
Gerald Porter
Jean-Pierre Isbouts

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Our Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic embodies a high potency and powerful ability for all sorts of bladder and UTI issues. But the combination of supernatant with ORNs, probiotics, cranberries, and pomegranates do so much more!

NEW CP Jpeg Short 4

The phytonutrients are more concentrated, standardize to 6% quinic acid for the cranberry and 40% punicalagins for the pomegranate extract.

There are now five different organisms of probiotics in the formula. We grow them as whole organisms with their supernatant and ORNs.  We selected organisms that have a natural antimicrobial abilities against hospital generated infections.

The supernatant component of the product is much more comprehensive, dramatically enhancing its benefits.  It has our typical famous metabolites of the Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus plus the metabolites of our added three more organisms, five all together! Supernatant contains the food fermentation by-products (metabolites) that include lactic acids, amino acids, folates, bacterocins, biosurfactants and various beneficial enzymes such as bile salts hydrolase and lactase.  And of course, the supernatant also has the ORNs (oligoribnucleotides- their shorter chains of microRNAs), which prime the immune system and activate the rapid growth of these powerful probiotic organisms.

The prebiotic per capsule is 100mg of organic chicory root inulin (the total amount of ingredients per capsule is 500mg). Since our probiotics wake up much more rapidly due to complete sets of ORNs, they need food to grow.

In research, these ingredients show a reduction, not only, to the risk of UTI associated conditions but for both colon and breast cancers as well.

  • Vaginal eubiosis- Vaginal eubiosis is characterised by beneficial lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. In contrast, vaginal dysbiosis (e.g. bacterial vaginosis, BV), characterized by an overgrowth of multiple anaerobes, is associated with an increased risk of adverse urogenital and reproductive health outcomes.  The Lactobaccilus sp. in our Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic are strong lactic acid producers.
  • Biosurfactants- The role of Lactobacillusspecies in the female urogenital tract as a barrier to infection is of considerable interest.  These organisms are believed to contribute to the control of vaginal microbiota by competing with other micro-organisms for adherence to epithelial cells and by producing biosurfactants (Rodrigues, L. et al., 2006).  The good probiotics in this formula have demonstrated the ability to produce mucins as biosurfactants against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens.
  • Cancer Protection Support- Ou, J et al. (2012) in their paper, Association between low colonic short-chain fatty acids and high bile acid in high colon cancer risk populations, proposed that the influence of diet on colon cancer risk is mediated by the microbiota.  Their results suggested that the higher risk of colon cancer in Americans may be partly explained by their high-fat and high-protein, low complex carbohydrate diet, which produces colonic residues that promote microbes such as Clostridia and E. coli to produce potentially carcinogenic secondary bile acids and less antineoplastic SCFAs.  Our collection of good bacteria in this formula are SCFA producers and secondary bile acids reducers as you can see with one of their metabolites being the enzyme bile salts hydrolase.  These good bugs also put out bacterocins agains Clostridiaand E. coli.
  • Breast Cancer- Costarelli, V., and Sanders, T.A.B. (2002) found that the mean plasma secondary bile salt derivative DCA concentration were 52% higher in patients  with breast cancer compared with controls.  Reducing gut levels of DCA will reduce plasma levels.  Thereby, reducing this risk factor.
  • Colon Cancer- AJouz, H., Mukherjui, D., and Shamseddine, A. in their 2014 research paper stated that bile acids going into the intestines stimulate growth in the colon of Clostridia which convert primary to secondary bile acids, and secondary bile acids that were shown to be carcinogenic.   Hence the important of our good bugs that produce bacterocins to reduce Clostridial populations.
  • Animal Fat-Rich Diets- There is increasing evidence (Barrasa, J.I. et al. 2013) that the continous exposure to certain hydrophobic bile acids, due to a fat-rich diet may induce oxidative DNA damage that, in turn, may lead to colorectal carcinogenesis.

References

  • Tachedjian, G., Aldunate, M., Bradshaw, C. S., & Cone, R. A. (2017). The role of lactic acid production by probiotic Lactobacillus species in vaginal health. Research in microbiology, 168(9-10), 782-792. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0923250817300839?via%3Dihub
  • Rodrigues, L., Banat, I. M., Teixeira, J., & Oliveira, R. (2006). Biosurfactants: potential applications in medicine. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 57(4), 609-618. https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/57/4/609/669417
  • Ou, J., DeLany, J. P., Zhang, M., Sharma, S., & O’Keefe, S. J. (2012). Association between low colonic short-chain fatty acids and high bile acids in high colon cancer risk populations. Nutrition and cancer, 64(1), 34-40.
  • Costarelli, V., & Sanders, T. A. B. (2002). Plasma deoxycholic acid concentration is elevated in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. European journal of clinical nutrition, 56(9), 925.  https://www.nature.com/articles/1601396
  • Ajouz, H., Mukherji, D., & Shamseddine, A. (2014). Secondary bile acids: an underrecognized cause of colon cancer. World journal of surgical oncology, 12(1), 164.
  • Barrasa, J. I., Olmo, N., Lizarbe, M. A., & Turnay, J. (2013). Bile acids in the colon, from healthy to cytotoxic molecules. Toxicology in Vitro, 27(2), 964-977.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI).  Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-drived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures

González de Llano, D., Esteban-Fernández, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Martínlvarez, P. J., Moreno-Arribas, M., & Bartolomé, B. (2015). Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-derived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures. International journal of molecular sciences, 16(6), 12119-12130.

In the study sited below data indicated that both pomegranate aril and peel extracts have an effective antimicrobial activity, as evidenced by the inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth of two important human pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

Pagliarulo, C., De Vito, V., Picariello, G., Colicchio, R., Pastore, G., Salvatore, P., & Volpe, M. G. (2016). Inhibitory effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) polyphenol extracts on the bacterial growth and survival of clinical isolates of pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Food chemistry, 190, 824-831. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.06.028

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Powerful UTI Care

July 31, 2018

Dear Friends

Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic is back!  And it is more powerful with a broad specturm anti-microbial ability.

NEW CP Jpeg Short 4

The raw materials are the same, but more powerful, and with supernatant from each of the probiotics plus their individual ORNs.

We standardized the Cranberry concentrate at 6%.  The 6% is refers to its amount of quinic acid, key for UTI issues.  The pomegranate is standardized at 40% with its punicalagins, offering more intensive anti-microibal, anti-oxidants, and cancer support. The probiotics work synergistically with the extracts, breaking them down into shorter phenolic molecules, which means they are bio-available to do their various tasks.

We have five probiotics now, with  newly added  L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus.  The supernatant contains the metabolites of  L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, L. casei, L. acidophilus, and B. longum, including their ORNs (oligoribonucleotides).

Our new blend of naturally occurring whole probiotic organisms is grown to fully retain their oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and mixed with their metabolites from their culture supernatant. The cultures are now able to grow faster without any delay (the term in microbiology is ‘lag-time’), and because of that they are more effective and generate a healthier microbiome balance.

This new Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic combines the power of our Supernatant Synbiotic and the LactORN Synbiotic products. With the polyphenol concentrates, the formula is truly a powerhouse for UTI care.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI).  Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-drived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures

González de Llano, D., Esteban-Fernández, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Martínlvarez, P. J., Moreno-Arribas, M., & Bartolomé, B. (2015). Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-derived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures. International journal of molecular sciences, 16(6), 12119-12130.

In the study sited below data indicated that both pomegranate aril and peel extracts have an effective antimicrobial activity, as evidenced by the inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth of two important human pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

Pagliarulo, C., De Vito, V., Picariello, G., Colicchio, R., Pastore, G., Salvatore, P., & Volpe, M. G. (2016). Inhibitory effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) polyphenol extracts on the bacterial growth and survival of clinical isolates of pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Food chemistry, 190, 824-831. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.06.028

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

The Fructo Borate Complex is back!!!

FB old BtlHere are some of the reasons why Fructo Borate is important:

Fructo Borate Complex is a plant form of the mineral boron that is based on how boron is found in plants— a covalently bound boron to plant carbohydrate.  When boron is not tightly bound, it can become toxic in our gut as it forms boric acid.

In the Fructo Borate, each boron ion is strongly bound to two plant – fructose molecules.  Therefore it passed into the systemic circulation without disassociating with its carbohydrate bond.  Preventing it from turning into boric acid in the gut.

Boron is considered to be a master mineral and is a co-factor in many metabolic functions.  Each capsule provides 6 mg of elemental boron.  In areas of the world where boron dietary intakes usually were 1mg or less/day, the estimated incidence of arthritis ranged from 20% to 70%.  On the other hand, in areas of the world where boron dietary intakes were usually 3mg to 10mg, the estimated incidence of arthritis ranged from 0% to 10% (Newnham, R.E., 1994).

In Nothing boring about boron, Pizzorno (2015) nicely summarizes some of boron’s many benefits: (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and TNF alpha; (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolescules, such as SAM-e and NAD+; (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents.

References:


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Boron is one of the most important minerals in our diet.  How are your boron levels?

The average American’s boron levels are 1 mg/day; and, many studies have shown that the benefits to be derived from boron intake don’t occur until levels of 3 mg/day and above are achieved (Price et al., 2012).

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

What is the connection between the microbiome and heart heatlh? The microbiome’s metabolites are emerging as the deciding influence for good or bad health. We will dive into this topic in the next couple of weeks (check green facts below).

BG photoAs Dr. JoAnn Manson, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital says in Healthy gut, Healthy Heart(2018):

There’s a complex interplay between the microbes in our intestines and most of the systems in our bodies, including the vascular, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  All of these relationships are highly relevant to cardiovascular health.

What we eat plays a major role in the composition of our gut microbiota.  And we’re learning more about how the substances gut microbes churn out (called metabolites) influence our risk for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

The Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic: Cardio-Metabolic Support is a great product for seeding the gut with good pedigreed bacteria and prebiotic fibers that strongly support the integrity of the GI tract membrane, support the reduction of GI tract inflammation, support the strengthening and balancing of the immune system.

Probiotics are found in research to positively effect heart health (Kassaian et al., 2017; Sáez-Lara et al., 2016; DiRienzo, 2014; Delzenne et al., 2011; Saini et al., 2010), with many researchers positing the connection between heart and gut health (Serino et al., 2014; Huang et al., 2013).*

Oats and oat beta glucan have enjoyed a rich cultural historicity and extensive research on heart health (Andersson & Hellstrand, 2012).  Oats and oat beta glucan are found to reduce serum LDL cholesterol (Ho et al., 2016; Zhu et al., 2015; Whitehead et al., 2014; Wolever et al., 2010), improve liver function (Chang et al., 2013), and promote bowel regularity (Clemens, 2012; Mobley et al., 2014).*

Red beetroot offer a rich source of phyto-nutrients, including ascorbic acid (vitamin C), carotenoids, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Beets provide a source of dietary nitrate, shown in research to have important implication for heart health (Kapil et al., 2014). Beet’s nutrients are shown to prevent oxidation of LDLs, lower triglycerides, and balances blood pressure (Clifford et al., 2015; Eggenbeen et al., 2016; Hobbs et al., 2013).*

Inulin from organic chicory root supplies food for the probiotic organisms. Probiotic organisms need fiber to grow and multiply. See Slavin (2013) on fiber as prebiotics, and Dehghan et al. (2013) on inulin and cardiovascular support.*  Together with probiotic, inulin is also found in research to help tighten cell junctions, which is thought to aid against leaky gut syndrome (Cani et al., 2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009).*

The Beta Glucan was formulated to nourish both heart and gut into health.*

Bibliography:

  • Kassaian, N., Aminorroaya, A., Feizi, A., Jafari, P., Amini, M. (2017). The effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on metabolic syndrome indices in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trial, 18(1), 148. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-017-1885-8
  • Sáez-Lara, M.J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F.J., Plaza-Diaz, J., Gil, A.(2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci, 17(6).DOI: 10.3390/ijms17060928
  • DiRienzo D.B. (2014). Effect of probiotics on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: implications for heart-healthy diets. Nutr Rev, 72(1), 18-29. DOI: 10.1111/nure.12084
  • Delzenne, N.M., Neyrinck, A.M., Cani, P.D.(2011). Modulation of the gut microbiota by nutrients with prebiotic properties: consequences for host health in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Microb Cell Fact, 10 Suppl 1, S10. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2859-10-S1-S10
  • Saini, R., Saini, S., & Sharma, S. (2010). Potential of probiotics in controlling cardiovascular diseases. J.Cardiovasc Dis Res,1(4), 213-214. DOI: 10.4103/0975-3583.74267
  • Serino, M., Blasco-Baque, V., Nicolas, S., & Burcelin, R. (2014). Far from the Eyes, Close to the Heart: Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Cardiovasuclar Consequences. Curr Cardiol Rep, 16(11), 540. DOI: 10.1007/s11886-014-0540-1
  • Huang, Y., Wang, X., Wang, J., Wu, F., Sui, Y., Yang, L., Wang, Z. (2013). Lactobacillus plantarum strains as potential probiotic cultures with cholesterol-lowering activity. J Dairy Sci, 96(5), 2746-53.DOI: 10.3168/jds.2012-6123
  • Anderson, K.E., & Hellstrand, P. (2012). Dietary oats and modulation of atherogenic pathways. Mol Nutr Food Res, 56(7), 1003-13. DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201100706
  • Ho, H.V., Sievenpiper, J.L., Zurbau, A., Blanco Mejia, S., Jovanovski, E., Au-Yeung, F… Vuksan, V. (2016). The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials. Br J Nutr. 116(8):1369-1382. DOI: 10.1017/S000711451600341X
  • Zhu, X., Sun, X., Wang, M., Zhang, C., Cao, Y., Mo, G., Liang, J., Zhu, S. (2015).Quantitative assessment of the effects of beta-glucan consumption on serum lipid profile and glucose level in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis, 25(8), 714-23.DOI: 10.1016/j.numecd.2015.04.008
  • Whitehead A, Beck EJ, Tosh S, Wolever TM. (2014). Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr, 100(6), 1413-21.DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086108


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Healthy Gut, Healthy Heart:  How the trillions of bacteria in your intestinal tract play a role in your cardiovascular health.

Metabolomics—the study of metabolites—is an emerging scientific discipline of great importance for bettering our understanding of the connection of our GI tract microbiome and the health of our body. More on this topic next week.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved