Metabolic Syndrome Support

Care For Your Heart

November 14, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                      

Metabolic Syndrome is considered the leading cause of Heart Disease, the number one killer in the United States.

Three of our Therapeutic Food Supplements are designed with intelligent ingredients that are shown in research to support and help reverse both heart disease and the different conditions associated with metabolic syndrome: Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic, Weight-less Systemic Booster, and Organic Chlorella.

  • Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic– 1 heaping tbl twice daily before two largest meals.
  • Weight-less:  NO. 4 Systemic Booster– 2 capsules one-half hour before meals. A must do before a high carb meal or snack.
  • Organic Chlorella– 4 tablets taken with meals.

Food Science

Metabolic Syndrome is a disorder affecting approximately one-quarter of the American population. It is in fact considered a worldwide epidemic (NIH: NHLBI, 2015).

The risk factors for Metabolic Syndrome are:  Abdominal obesity, Atherogenic dyslipidemia,
Raised blood pressure, Insulin resistance, Pro-inflammatory state, and Pro-thrombotic state (McCullough 2011, Grundy 2004).
Beta Glucan HZ 3
The Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic contains powerful soluble and insoluble fibers and pedigreed strains of probiotics.

Multitude research articles strongly indicate that as dietary fiber goes up the risk of Metabolic Syndrome goes down (Grooms, 2013).

A healthy gut microbiome supports the maintenance of a healthy GI tract membrane barrier function.  Cani et al. (2008) found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels set the tone of insulin sensitivity and the onset of obesity and diabetes.  An increased gut permeability allowed for the passage of LPS through the gut wall into the systemic circulation.  Thus, lowering plasma LPS concentration could be a potent strategy for the control of metabolic diseases.

Cani et al. (2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009) demonstrated that adding soluble fibers to our daily diet, such as inulin and oat bran beta glucan (containing oligofructose chains found in the Beta Glucan Synbiotic), stimulates the growth of Bifidobacteria sp., which caused a reduction in gut permeability, thereby reducing the levels of LPS systemically, which initiates weight loss, and reduction of metabolic disorders.
WL Low Cropped Jpeg 2
Weight-less is a smart metabolic booster formula – the mix supports weight loss and effectively boosting energy levels.  Weight-less contains wild brown seaweed extracts from kelp and bladderwrack as well as 7-Keto DHEA.  Brown seaweeds are shown in research to lower the glycemic load of complex and simple carbohydrates for better insulin management, as well as offer a power-filled phenolic activity for antioxidant and anti-inflammation effect (Roy et al., 2011). The 7-Keto has been used for many years to turn on fat burning mechanism and offer an effective and safe way to lose weight (Bobyleva et al., 1997).

Together, Weight-less promotes a sustained energy level throughout the day as it modulates carbohydrate digestion and absorption for better weight management and metabolic health (Gabbia et al., 2017; Catarino et al., 2017).
Chlorella HZ
Organic Chlorella– New studies show that Chlorella supports reduction of body fat, improves fat and glucose metabolism, decrease weight, and reduce the risk factors involved with Metabolic Disease.

Mizoguchi et al. (2008) in their research, Nutrigenomic studies of effects of Chlorella on subjects with high-risk factors for lifestyle-related disease, demonstrated that Chlorella intake, in 17 subjects with high risk factors for lifestyle-related disease (obesity, diabetes or hyperlipidemia) and 17 healthy subjects, results in noticeable reductions in body fat percentage, total blood serum cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels.

Their research confirmed that Chlorella intake brings about improvements in both fat metabolism and glucose metabolism.  The expression of genes involved in the insulin signaling pathway were also affected by Chlorella vulgaris intake, especially those related to glucose uptake in tissue, providing support for the observation that Chlorella lowers blood glucose levels.

Vecina et al.’s (2014), Chlorella modulates insulin signaling pathway and prevents high-fat-diet- induces insulin resistance in mice, research goal was to evaluate the prophylactic effect Chlorella vulgaris on body weight, lipid profile, blood glucose and insulin signaling in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of diet-induced obese mice.

Their conclusion was that C. vulgaris supplementation (Chlorella) could be considered as an adjunctive therapy to decrease weight and improve glycemic status and reducing hs-CRP as well as improving liver function in patients with NAFLD.

References:

  • Bobyleva, V., Bellei, M., Kneer, N., & Lardy, H. (1997). The effects of the ergosteroid 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone on mitochondrial membrane potential: possible relationship to thermogenesis. Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, 341(1), 122-128. https://doi.org/10.1006/abbi.1997.9955
  • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103
  • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-8.
    Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
  • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.
  • Catarino, M. D., Silva, A., & Cardoso, S. M. (2017). Fucaceae: A source of bioactive phlorotannins. International journal of molecular sciences, 18(6), 1327. Article
  • Gabbia, D., Dall’Acqua, S., Di Gangi, I. M., Bogialli, S., Caputi, V., Albertoni, L., … & De Martin, S. (2017). The Phytocomplex from Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum Controls Postprandial Plasma Glucose Levels: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study in a Mouse Model of NASH. Marine drugs, 15(2), 41. DOI:10.3390/md15020041
  • Grooms et al. (2013). Dietary Fiber Intake and Cardiometablic Risk among US Adults: NHANES 1999-2010. Am J Med; 126(12): 1059-1067.
  • Grundy, S. M. (2004). Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 89(6), 2595-2600.
  • Mizoguchi et al. (2008). Nutrigenomic studies of effects of Chlorella on subjects with high-risk factors for lifestyle-related disease.  J Med Food; 11(3): 395-404.
  • Roy, M. C., Anguenot, R., Fillion, C., Beaulieu, M., Bérubé, J., & Richard, D. (2011). Effect of a commercially-available algal phlorotannins extract on digestive enzymes and carbohydrate absorption in vivo. Food research international, 44(9), 3026-3029. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2011.07.023
  • Vecina et al. (2014). Chlorella modulate insulin signaling pathway and prevents high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance in mice. Life Sci; 95(1): 45-52.
  • Whaley-Connell, A., McCullough, P. A., & Sowers, J. R. (2011). The role of oxidative stress in the metabolic syndrome. Reviews in cardiovascular medicine, 12(1), 21-29.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Choosing a healthy diet: Research studies link the emerging global pattern of metabolic syndrome and weight gain to the prevalence of Westernized diet of daily meats, dairy, eggs, simple and processed carbohydrates, and too much sugar (Chai et al., 2017; Azadbakht & Esmaillzadeh, 2009; Lutsey et al., 2008). Although there are conflicting views on dietary guidelines, many scientists and health organizations agree that a focus on whole food plant-based diet is the healthiest guideline for metabolic syndrome and weight loss (Yokoyama et al., 2017; Satija et al., 2017; Kahleova et al., 2017; Hever et al., 2017; Turner et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016; Wang et al., 2015; Tilman & Clark, 2014; WHO/FAO, 2003).*

The Plates, Pyramids, Planet report, compiled in collaboration with the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN) at the University of Oxford, concludes that a plant-based diet has many advantages for health and the environment (UN Report, 2016).*

The type and nature of carbohydrates that improve our metabolic health (obesity, cardiovascular, and diabetes) are comprised of whole plants with fiber (Wright et al., 2017). Whereas low carbs diets with high fat content is shown to increase metabolic syndrome (Lamont et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016).*

A diet that is 80-90% whole food plant-based is highly recommeded by many health organizations and medical universities around the world.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                      WL Low Cropped Jpeg

Weight-Less is a smart formula for less weight and more energy.

Weight-Less is Wild Crafted (seaweeds), Organic (seaweeds), Vegan, Kosher, Non GMO, and Gluten Free. Take 1-2 capsules a half hour before meals.

Food Science

Marine algae, in particular, wild brown seaweed such as kelp and bladderwrack are shown to lower the glycemic load of complex and simple carbohydrates for better insulin management, as well as offer a power-filled phenolic activity for antioxidant and anti-inflammation effect (Roy et al., 2011). 7-Keto has been used for many years to turn on fat burning mechanism and offer an effective and safe way to lose weight (Bobyleva et al., 1997). Together, Weight-Less promotes a sustained energy level throughout the day as it modulates carbohydrate digestion and absorption for better weight management and metabolic health (Gabbia et al., 2017; Catarino et al., 2017).*

Weight management is essential to our health, yet difficult to achieve. Research has correlated excess body fat with metabolic syndrome, which includes high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides. These metabolic syndrome factors are found to increase the risk for cardiovascular issues, obesity, diabetes, and cancer (American Heart Association, 2017; National Cancer Institute, 2017). In fact, metabolic syndrome is now a growing public health concern worldwide (Wright et al., 2017; Calton et al., 2014).*

Inflammation is also shown in research to link obesity and cardio–metabolic risks for obese and non-obese individuals (Phillips & Perry, 2013). Hence, a diet of whole plants rich in phenols is shown in research to offer anti-inflammatory benefits (Wright et al., 2017; McAnulty et al., 2014). Weight-Less is comprised of wildcrafted brown seaweeds shown in research to offer potent phenols with high total antioxidant potency, antidiabetic properties, and anti-inflammatory potential (Gabbia et al., 2017; Catarino et al., 2017; Pantidos et al., 2014; Bahar et al., 2012).*

Studies have linked low glycemic index to improved cardiovascular health, blood sugar control, weight control, and even skin health (McMillan-Price et al., 2006, Barclay et al., 2008, Hare-Bruun et al., 2006; Smith et al., 2007, respectively). For this reason, 250 mg of brown seaweed extracts of kelp and bladderwrack is used half an hour before meals to aid carbohydrate digestion and assimilation; shifting high glycemic index food to one typical of a low glycemic index food (Paradis et al., 2011; Roy et al., 2011; Bérubé et al., 2014). Studies find supplementing with brown seaweed before meals to help slow down the digestion of whole or simple carbs to significantly reduce blood glucose for overall glycemic control (Gabbia et al., 2017; Bérubé et al., 2014; Kim et al., 2014; Lamarche et al., 2010). Glycemic control supports a consistent metabolic health and weight management.*

7-Keto DHEA, or 7-oxo DHEA is named after the compound 3-acetyl-7-oxo dehydroepiandrosterone, a substance found naturally in the body that is metabolized from the hormone DHEA (Marwah et al., 2002). Studies have indicated that 7-Keto is stable (does not convert to testosterone or estrogens), safe and effective as part of a weight loss program (Lardy et al., 1995, Davidson et al., 2000; Humanetics Corps, 2005, respectively). In fact, 7-Keto has shown in studies to activate 3 thermogenic enzymes, known to help the body convert stored fat to energy (Zenk et al., 2007, 2004). But since levels of DHEA and 7-oxo decline in our body with age, supplementation with 7-Keto helps maintain healthy levels for weight management (Lardy et al., 1998; 1995).*

In the pre-clinical development (see Bobyleva et al., 1993), 7-Keto was found to behave similarly to the thyroid hormone which also activates the thermogenic enzymes in our body. 7-oxo DHEA showed similar ability to restore mitochondrial function (Bobyleva et al., 1997) and support weight loss by enhancing thermogenic enzyme activity.*

Clinical trials have been ongoing since 1999, in specific, two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled (“RDBPC”) in 1999 and 2000 have shown that 7-keto significantly increased weight loss over a period of eight weeks compared to the placebo group (Zenk et al., 2002; see also Kaiman et al., 2000; Bobyleva et al., 1997).*

Thermogenesis is the creation of heat in the body; a form of energy that is produced when we eat and metabolize food. Kaiman et al. (2000; see also Zenk et al., 2002) conducted a RDBPC study of 30 healthy overweight adults for 8 weeks. The group taking the supplement of 7-Keto showed a significantly reduced body weight. The study included exercise (three times a week) and a reduced caloric diet for both placebo and 7-Keto groups. Zenk et al. (2004; 2007) similarly found that 7-Keto increased metabolism, which is shown in research to promote weight loss and support the management of weight overall. By up-regulating the activity of fat burning enzymes (the thermogenic effect), energy expenditure is increased, enhancing the process of weight loss (Gomez et al., 2002).*

Moreover, 7-oxo DHEA is also shown in research to enhance memory in young and old rats (Shi et al., 2000), immune modulation in older men (Hampl et al., 2000), and significantly enhance depressive symptoms and hypo-immunity of mice when induced by chronic mild stress (Liu et al., 2003).*

Weight-Less combines brown seaweed extracts of kelp and bladderwrack with 7-Keto to support weight loss. The formula enhances the body’s ability to burn fat more efficiently, create energy, and promote metabolic health. Together with a primarily whole food plant-based diet (see green facts below) and reasonable exercise, managing weight is healthy and even joyful. *

References:

  • American Heart Association. (2017). About metabolic syndrome. Article
  • Amine, E., Baba, N., Belhadj, M., Deurenbery-Yap, M., Djazayery, A., Forrester, T., … & Katan, M. (2002). Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases: report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. World Health Organization. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases – World Health …
  • Azadbakht, L., & Esmaillzadeh, A. (2009). Red meat intake is associated with metabolic syndrome and the plasma C-reactive protein concentration in women. The Journal of nutrition, 139(2), 335-339. DOI:10.3945/jn.108.096297
  • Barclay, A. W., Petocz, P., McMillan-Price, J., Flood, V. M., Prvan, T., Mitchell, P., & Brand-Miller, J. C. (2008). Glycemic index, glycemic load, and chronic disease risk—a meta-analysis of observational studies. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 87(3), 627-637. Abstract
  • Bahar, B., O’Doherty, J. V., Hayes, M., & Sweeney, T. (2012). Extracts of brown seaweeds can attenuate the bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory response in the porcine colon ex vivo. Journal of animal science, 90(Supplement_4), 46-48. Abstract
  • Bobyleva, V., Bellei, M., Kneer, N., & Lardy, H. (1997). The effects of the ergosteroid 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone on mitochondrial membrane potential: possible relationship to thermogenesis. Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, 341(1), 122-128. https://doi.org/10.1006/abbi.1997.9955
  • Calton, Emily K., Anthony P. James, Poonam K. Pannu, and Mario J. Soares. “Certain dietary patterns are beneficial for the metabolic syndrome: reviewing the evidence.” Nutrition Research 34, no. 7 (2014): 559-568. DOI:10.1016/j.nutres.2014.06.012
  • Catarino, M. D., Silva, A., & Cardoso, S. M. (2017). Fucaceae: A source of bioactive phlorotannins. International journal of molecular sciences, 18(6), 1327. Article
  • Chai, W., Morimoto, Y., Cooney, R. V., Franke, A. A., Shvetsov, Y. B., Le Marchand, L., … & Maskarinec, G. (2017). Dietary Red and Processed Meat Intake and Markers of Adiposity and Inflammation: The Multiethnic Cohort Study. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 36(5), 378-385. DOI:10.1080/07315724.2017.1318317
  • Davidson, M., Marwah, A., Sawchuk, R. J., & Maki, K. (2000). Safety and pharmacokinetic study with escalating doses of 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone in healthy male volunteers. Clinical and investigative medicine, 23(5), 300. Abstract
  • Gabbia, D., Dall’Acqua, S., Di Gangi, I. M., Bogialli, S., Caputi, V., Albertoni, L., … & De Martin, S. (2017). The Phytocomplex from Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum Controls Postprandial Plasma Glucose Levels: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study in a Mouse Model of NASH. Marine drugs, 15(2), 41. DOI:10.3390/md15020041
  • Gonzalez Fischer, C., & Garnett, T. (2016). Plates, pyramids, planet. Oxford, UK: Oxford University. Abstract
  • Gomez, F. E., Miyazaki, M., Kim, Y. C., Marwah, P., Lardy, H. A., Ntambi, J. M., & Fox, B. G. (2002). Molecular differences caused by differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in the presence of either dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or 7-oxo-DHEA. Biochemistry, 41(17), 5473-5482. Abstract
  • Hare-Bruun, H., Flint, A., & Heitmann, B. L. (2006). Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to changes in body weight, body fat distribution, and body composition in adult Danes. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 84(4), 871-879. Abstract
  • Hampl, R., Lapcik, O., Hill, M., Klak, J., Kasal, A., Novacek, A., … & Starka, L. (2000). 7-Hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone-a natural antiglucocorticoid and a candidate for steroid replacement therapy?. Physiological Research, 49, S107-S112. Article
  • Hever, J., & Cronise, R. J. (2017). Plant-based nutrition for healthcare professionals: implementing diet as a primary modality in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. Journal of Geriatric Cardiology: JGC, 14(5), 355. DOI:  10.11909/j.issn.1671-5411.2017.05.012
  • Humanetics Corporation (2005). 7 Keto Innovative Weight Loss. Retrieved from www.humaneticscorp.com.
  • Kahleova, H., Levin, S., & Barnard, N. (2017). Cardio-Metabolic Benefits of Plant-Based Diets. Nutrients, 9(8), 848. DOI:10.3390/nu9080848
  • Kaiman, D. S., Colker, C. M., Swain, M. A., Torina, G. C., & Shi, Q. (2000). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone in healthy overweight adults. Current therapeutic research, 61(7), 435-442. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0011-393X(00)80026-0
  • Kim, K. T., Rioux, L. E., & Turgeon, S. L. (2014). Alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase inhibition is differentially modulated by fucoidan obtained from Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum. Phytochemistry, 98, 27-33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2013.12.003
  • Lamarche, B., Paradis, M. È., & Couture, P. (2010). Study of the acute impact of polyphenols from brown seaweeds on glucose control in healthy men and women. The FASEB Journal, 24(1 Supplement), 209-4. Abstract
  • Lamont, B. J., Waters, M. F., & Andrikopoulos, S. (2016). A low-carbohydrate high-fat diet increases weight gain and does not improve glucose tolerance, insulin secretion or β-cell mass in NZO mice. Nutrition & diabetes, 6(2), e194. DOI: 10.1038/nutd.2016.2
  • Lardy, H., Partridge, B., Kneer, N., & Wei, Y. (1995). Ergosteroids: induction of thermogenic enzymes in liver of rats treated with steroids derived from dehydroepiandrosterone. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 92(14), 6617-6619. Abstract
  • Lardy, H., Kneer, N., Wei, Y., Partridge, B., & Marwah, P. (1998). Ergosteroids II: biologically active metabolites and synthetic derivatives of dehydroepiandrosterone. Steroids, 63(3), 158-165. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0039-128X(97)00159-1
  • Liu, Y. Y., Yang, N., Kong, L. N., & Zuo, P. P. (2003). Effects of 7-oxo-DHEA treatment on the immunoreactivity of BALB/c mice subjected to chronic mild stress. Yao xue xue bao= Acta pharmaceutica Sinica, 38(12), 881-884. Abstract
  • Lutsey, P. L., Steffen, L. M., & Stevens, J. (2008). Dietary intake and the development of the metabolic syndrome. The Atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Circulation, 117(6), 754-761. DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.71615
  • Marwah, A., Marwah, P., & Lardy, H. (2002). Ergosteroids: VI. Metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone by rat liver in vitro: a liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric study. Journal of Chromatography B, 767(2), 285-299. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1570-0232(01)00570-0
  • McAnulty, L.S., Collier, S.R., Landram, M.J., Whittaker, D.S., Isaacs, S.E., Klemka, J.M… McAnulty, S.R. (2014). Six weeks daily ingestion of whole blueberry powder increases natural killer cell counts and reduces arterial stiffness in sedentary males and females. Nutr Res, 34 (7), 577-84. DOI: 10.1016/j.nutres.2014.07.002
  • McMillan-Price, J., Petocz, P., Atkinson, F., O’Neill, K., Samman, S., Steinbeck, K., … & Brand-Miller, J. (2006). Comparison of 4 diets of varying glycemic load on weight loss and cardiovascular risk reduction in overweight and obese young adults: a randomized controlled trial. Archives of internal medicine, 166(14), 1466-1475. Article
  • Pantidos, N., Boath, A., Lund, V., Conner, S., & McDougall, G. J. (2014). Phenolic-rich extracts from the edible seaweed, ascophyllum nodosum, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase: Potential anti-hyperglycemic effects. Journal of Functional Foods, 10, 201-209. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jff.2014.06.018
  • Paradis, M. E., Couture, P., & Lamarche, B. (2011). A randomised crossover placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect of brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus) on postchallenge plasma glucose and insulin levels in men and women. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 36(6), 913-919. DOI:10.1139/h11-115
  • Phillips, C. M., & Perry, I. J. (2013). Does inflammation determine metabolic health status in obese and nonobese adults?. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 98(10), E1610-E1619. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-2038
  • Roy, M. C., Anguenot, R., Fillion, C., Beaulieu, M., Bérubé, J., & Richard, D. (2011). Effect of a commercially-available algal phlorotannins extract on digestive enzymes and carbohydrate absorption in vivo. Food research international, 44(9), 3026-3029. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2011.07.023
  • Satija, A., Bhupathiraju, S. N., Spiegelman, D., Chiuve, S. E., Manson, J. E., Willett, W., … & Hu, F. B. (2017). Healthful and unhealthful plant-based diets and the risk of coronary heart disease in US adults. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 70(4), 411-422. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2017.05.047
  • Shi, J., Schulze, S., & Lardy, H. A. (2000). The effect of 7-oxo-DHEA acetate on memory in young and old C57BL/6 mice. Steroids, 65(3), 124-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0039-128X(99)00094-X
  • Smith, R. N., Mann, N. J., Braue, A., Mäkeläinen, H., & Varigos, G. A. (2007). A low-glycemic-load diet improves symptoms in acne vulgaris patients: a randomized controlled trial. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 86(1), 107-115. Abstract
  • Šulcová, J., Hill, M., Mašek, Z., Češka, R., Nováček, A., Hampl, R., & Starka, L. (2001). Effects of transdermal application of 7-oxo-DHEA on the levels of steroid hormones, gonadotropins and lipids in healthy men. Physiol Res, 50, 9-18. Article
  • Tilman, D., & Clark, M. (2014). Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health. Nature, 515(7528), 518-522. Article
  • Turner, K. M., Keogh, J. B., Meikle, P. J., & Clifton, P. M. (2017). Changes in Lipids and Inflammatory Markers after Consuming Diets High in Red Meat or Dairy for Four Weeks. Nutrients, 9(8). DOI:  10.3390/nu9080886
  • United Nation News Centre. (2016). UN study urges governments to develop guidelines that promote ‘win-win’ diets. Article
  • Wang, F., Zheng, J., Yang, B., Jiang, J., Fu, Y., & Li, D. (2015). Effects of vegetarian diets on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of the American Heart Association, 4(10), e002408. DOI:10.1161/JAHA.115.002408
  • Wright, N., Wilson, L., Smith, M., Duncan, B., & McHugh, P. (2017). The BROAD study: A randomised controlled trial using a whole food plant-based diet in the community for obesity, ischaemic heart disease or diabetes. Nutrition & diabetes, 7(3), e256. DOI:10.1038/nutd.2017.3
  • Yokoyama, Y., Levin, S. M., & Barnard, N. D. (2017). Association between plant-based diets and plasma lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition Reviews, 75(9), 683-698. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nux030
  • Zenk, J. L., Helmer, T. R., Kassen, L. J., & Kuskowski, M. A. (2002). The effect of 7-Keto Naturalean™ on weight loss: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Current therapeutic research, 63(4), 263-272. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0011-393X(02)80031-5
  • Zenk, J. L., Helmer, T. R., & Kuskowski, M. A. (2004, March). The use of 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone for augmenting immune response in the elderly. In FASEB JOURNAL (Vol. 18, No. 5, pp. A794-A794). 9650 ROCKVILLE PIKE, BETHESDA, MD 20814-3998 USA: FEDERATION AMER SOC EXP BIOL.
  • Zenk, J. L., Frestedt, J. L., & Kuskowski, M. A. (2007). HUM5007, a novel combination of thermogenic compounds, and 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone: each increases the resting metabolic rate of overweight adults. The Journal of nutritional biochemistry, 18(9), 629-634. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2006.11.008

Article by Dohrea Bardell PhD

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Choosing a healthy diet: Research studies link the emerging global pattern of metabolic syndrome and weight gain to the prevalence of Westernized diet of daily meats, dairy, eggs, simple and processed carbohydrates, and too much sugar (Chai et al., 2017; Azadbakht & Esmaillzadeh, 2009; Lutsey et al., 2008). Although there are conflicting views on dietary guidelines, many scientists and health organizations agree that a focus on whole food plant-based diet is the healthiest guideline for metabolic syndrome and weight loss (Yokoyama et al., 2017; Satija et al., 2017; Kahleova et al., 2017; Hever et al., 2017; Turner et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016; Wang et al., 2015; Tilman & Clark, 2014; WHO/FAO, 2003).*

The Plates, Pyramids, Planet report, compiled in collaboration with the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN) at the University of Oxford, concludes that a plant-based diet has many advantages for health and the environment (UN Report, 2016).*

The type and nature of carbohydrates that improve our metabolic health (obesity, cardiovascular, and diabetes) are comprised of whole plants with fiber (Wright et al., 2017). Whereas low carbs diets with high fat content is shown to increase metabolic syndrome (Lamont et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016).*

A diet that is 80-90% whole food plant-based is highly recommeded by many health organizations and medical universities around the world.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Original copy
The Original Synbiotic is a daily probiotic for the whole family.

The Original probiotics are researched pedigreed strains of lactic acid bacteria that support the development of a healthy GI tract microbiome.

A healthy gut microbiome is dependent on strong and proven probiotics, such as the Original strains. The Original Synbiotic provides a powerful symbiotic combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Streptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 19258), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and Bifidobacterium longum (ATCC 15707).

Our chosen probiotics are foundational ATCC strains shown in research to work together with human cells to perform many functions in the body. For example, these probiotic strains help the digestive system, support and balance the immune system, and enhance our nervous system by producing neurotransmitters. They reinforce the GI barrier function to protect us from xenobiotics and pathogens, even binding heavy metals. Moreover, they neutralize carcinogens such as those caused by heterocyclic amines found in blackened meat and elements such as nitrosamines in sausage. By acidifying the epithelial membrane, they enable the absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium more readily. And lastly, our chosen strains also support the important task of daily regularity (Syngia et al., 2016; Hardy et al., 2013; Figueroa‐González et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2009).

The Original Synbiotic suggested daily dose: one tsp daily.

Of the many beneficial functions needed to be performed by our probiotic friends, colonizing the GI tract membrane and thereby protecting from our body from pathogens and xenobiotics, is very important. Check out these studies on colonization (Toscano et al., 2017; Underwood et al., 2015; Panigrahi et al., 2008; De Champs et al., 2003; Sarem- Damerdji et al., 1995).

See the Original Synbiotic Monograph.

References:

  • De Champs, C., Maroncle, N., Balestrino, Damien., Rich, C., Forestier, C. (2003). Persistence of Colonization of Intestinal Mucosa by A Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus casei subsp rhamnosus Lcr35, after Oran Consumption. J Com Microbiol; 41(3): 1270-1273.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC150315/
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Panigrahi, P., Pradhan, L., Mohapatra, S.S., Misra, P.R., Johnson, J.A., Chaudhry, R., Taylor, S., Hanse, N.I., Gewolb, I.H. (2008). Long-term colonization of a Lactobacillus plantarum synbiotic preparation in the neonatal gut. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 47(1):45-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607268
  • Sarem-Damerdji, L., Sarem, F., Marchal, L., Micolas, J.P. (1995). In vitro colonization ability of human colon mucosa by exogenous Lactobacillus strains. FEMS Microbiology Letters; 131(2):133-137. https://academic.oup.com/femsle/article-abstract/131/2/133/524865/In-vitro-colonization-ability-of-human-colon?redirectedFrom=PDF
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of food science and technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Toscano, M., De Grandi, R., Stronati, L., De Vecchi, E., & Drago, L. (2017). Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the healthy gut microbiota composition at phyla and species level: A preliminary study. World journal of gastroenterology, 23(15), 2696.
  • Underwood, M. A., German, J. B., Lebrilla, C. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut. Pediatric research, 77, 229.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350908/

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3In today’s world the level of assault on our bodies from pollution, pathogens, and stress is so high that we need powerful food supplements.  Our bodies, after all, know exactly what and how to utilize food for therapeutic purposes.

At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Weight-Less

September 22, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                      WL Low Cropped Jpeg

Recent research has shown the link between chronic hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and weight gain. Hyperglycemia puts our body into a state of oxidative stress, which leads to many pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases (Domingueti et al., 2016).

Ingredients of Weight-Less per capsule

  • 7-Keto DHEA- 25mg (helps to burn fat)
  • 2 Brown Seaweed extracts- 200mg (help to lower and prevent high blood sugar levels, offers a strong anti-inflammatory, and supports weight loss)

Take 1 – 2 capsules of Weight-less one-half hour before meals, especially important before your carbohydrate (or meat) laden meals.* (See Green Facts on meat and diabetes)

Food Science

The ingredients in Weight-less have been shown to reduce both the states of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. The Kelp and Bladderwrack polyphenol extracts (phlorotannins) offer organic-certified bioactive ingredients that (1) act on amylase and glucosidase enzymes to optimize post-meal blood glucose and insulin responses and (2) demonstrate that they have a high total antioxidant activity as verified by the Total ORAC 6.0 assay.

The phenols in the kelp and bladderwrack have superior antioxidant activity – a neutralizing effect – on the primary free radical superoxide anion. Superoxide  anion is known as the “mother of  free radicals” because  it also can become a hydroxyl ROS, a nitrogen RNS and a hydrogen peroxide ROS.

Thus, Weight-Less helps prevent post-meal hyperglycemia and has a direct scavenging action on excess free radical generation.  The key is not to totally neutralize all free radical activity but to bring about a healthy redox homeostasis.

References:

  • Domingueti, C. P., Dusse, L. M. S. A., das Graças Carvalho, M., de Sousa, L. P., Gomes, K. B., & Fernandes, A. P. (2016). Diabetes mellitus: The linkage between oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and vascular complications. Journal of diabetes and its complications, 30(4), 738-745.
  • Hulsmans, M., & Holvoet, P. (2010). The vicious circle between oxidative stress and inflammation in atherosclerosis. Journal of cellular and molecular medicine, 14(1‐2), 70-78.
  • InterAct Consortium. (2013). Association between dietary meat consumption and incident type 2 diabetes: the EPIC-InterAct study. Diabetologia, 56(1), 47-59
  • Gutowski, M., & Kowalczyk, S. (2013). A study of free radical chemistry: their role and pathophysiological significance. Acta Biochimica Polonica, 60(1), 1-16.
  • Valko, M., Rhodes, C., Moncol, J., Izakovic, M. M., & Mazur, M. (2006). Free radicals, metals and antioxidants in oxidative stress-induced cancer. Chemico-biological interactions, 160(1), 1-40.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3High meat intake is also shown in research to generate oxidatative stress and hyperglacemia. We will discuss this in another email but meanwhile, see Dr. Greger’s informative video on Why is meat a risk factor for diabetes?
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
Phyto Power High Rez
Stull’s (2016) review, Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance, highlighted a multitude of in vivo and in vitro studies that demonstrated another of blueberries important attributes — the anti-diabetic effects of blueberries and berry extracts in insulin-resistant rodent, human, and cell culture models.

The scientific evidence in support of the anti-diabetic health benefits of blueberries and blueberry extract is encouraging. Epidemiological studies reported that consumption of foods rich in anthocyanins, especially from blueberries, were associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and of peripheral insulin resistance.

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as T2DM.  Although the prediabetes stage is when corrective actions need to be implemented to prevent the possible development of T2DM, many studies find blueberries to have an anti-diabetic effect. See the references below.

Dinstel et al. (2013) found the blueberries in Alaska to have the highest anthocyanins content. See Green Facts below. Our Phyto Power utilizes Alaskan blueberries’ potent levels of plant phenols.

Phyto Power is comprised of several species of wildcrafted blueberries, Rose hip, and Dandelion, including their leaves, stems, roots, and flowers. Growing wild and strong in remote areas of Alaska, these berries and plants are handpicked at the peak of their phytonutrient potential. For centuries, indigenous tribes of Alaskan Natives have used these power-filled berries and plants for their daily nourishment as well as ceremonial and medicinal purposes

Learn how to use Phyto Power in our research and description tabs.

References:

  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Haffner, S.M. (1996). The insulin resistance syndrome revisited. Diabetes Care,19:275-277. doi: 10.2337/diacare.19.3.275.
  • Jennings, A., Welch, A. A., Spector, T., Macgregor, A., & Cassidy, A. (2014). Intakes of anthocyanins and flavones are associated with biomarkers of insulin resistance and inflammation in women. The Journal of nutrition, 144(2), 202-208.
  • Muraki, I., Imamura, F., Manson, J. E., Hu, F. B., Willett, W. C., van Dam, R. M., & Sun, Q. (2013). Fruit consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: results from three prospective longitudinal cohort studies. Bmj, 347, f5001.
  • Stull, A. J. (2016). Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance. Antioxidants, 5(4), 44. doi:  10.3390/antiox5040044
  • Wedick N.M., Pan A., Cassidy A., Rimm E.B., Sampson L., Rosner B., Willett W., Hu F.B., Sun Q., van Dam R.M. (2012). Dietary flavonoid intakes and risk of type 2 diabetes in US men and women.  Am. J. Clin. Nutr, 95:925–933. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.028894.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved