Inflammatory Support

Phenols and Oncogenes

February 19, 2018

Dear Friends

Phyto Power:  Supports DNA and cellular integrity during oncogenic treatment due to
its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.Phyto Power Photo 3

Food Science
  • DNA & Cellular Integrity: Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are shown in research to help maintain cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significant re-generative health benefits to the brain and nervous system (Jedrejek et al., 2017; Jiménez et al., 2016; Skrovankova et al., 2015; Joseph et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2013; Andersson et al., 2012; Chatterjee et al., 2011; Adams et al., 2010).*
  • Anti-Inflammation: García-Lafuente et al. (2009) conclude that flavonoids from berries and plants behave as anti-inflammatory agents in our body. Blueberries are rich with anthocyanins and a wide variety of phytochemicals that have been shown to effect neuro-regeneration in the brain (Albarracin et al., 2012).*
  • Energy & Weight-Loss: Dandelion is shown to have a great antioxidant activity (Hu et al., 2003), exhibiting diverse biological activities that promote energy, weight loss, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Jedrejek et al., 2017; González-Castejón et al., 2012; Jeon et al., 2008). The Rose hip has a rich phytochemical profile known for its antioxidant protection (Widen et al., 2012), supporting weight loss with a potential mechanism that decreases abdominal visceral fat (Nagatomo et al., 2015).*

Added Suggestion: Combine with the Original Synbiotic to bolster immune support. Add also the greenest food, Organic Chlorella, to support detox mechanism and immunity.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Albarracin, S.L., Stab, B., Casas, Z., Sutachan, J.J., Samudio, I., Gonzalez, J….Barreto, G.E. (2012). Effects of natural antioxidants in neurodegenerative disease. Nutr Neurosci, 15, 1-9. DOI: 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000028
  • Andersson, U., Berger, K., Hogberg, A., Landin-Olsson, M., & Holm, C. (2012). Effects of rose hip intake on risk markers of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over investigation in obese persons. Eur J Clin Nutr, 66, 585-590. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.203
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537-552. DOI: 10.1007/s00011-009-0037-3
  • Hu, C., & Kitts, D.D. (2003). Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, (1), 301-310.DOI: 10.1021/jf0258858
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82-88. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2007.09.006
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159136
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Liu, W., Lu, X., He, G., Gao, X., Xu, M., Zhang, J… Luo, C. (2013). Protective roles of Gadd45 and MDM2 in blueberry anthocyanins mediated DNA repair of fragmented and non-fragmented DNA damage in UV-irradiated HepG2 cells. Int Mol Sci, 14(11), 21447-62. DOI: 10.3390/ijms141121447
  • Nagatomo, A., Nishida, N., Fukuhara, I., Noro, A., Kozai, Y., Sato, H., & Matsuura, Y. (2015). Daily intake of rosehip extract decreases abdominal visceral fat in preobese subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes, 8, 147-156.DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S78623
  • Skrovankova, S., Sumczynski, D., Mlcek, J., Jurikova, T., Sochor, J.(2015). Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.Int J Mol Sci, 16(10), 24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673
  • Widen, C., Ekholm, A., Coleman, M.D., Renvert, S., Rumpunen, K. (2012). Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.) Oxid Med Cell Longev, 621579. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/621579 .

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens.

Such is the title of Puupponen‐Pimiä et al.’s (2005) research on berry phenolics.  The purpose of the their study was to determine the effects of berries and berry phenolics on selected pathogenic gastrointestinal bacteria and to identify single phenolic compounds possessing antimicrobial activity.

Phenolic’s antimicrobial activity has gained importance as phenolic berry extracts inhibit the growth of selected Gram-negative intestinal bacteria and are not active against Gram-positive beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria (Puupponen-Pimiä et al. 2001).

The study includes a selection of Scandanavian berries whose collective polyphenolic content is similiar to what is present in the offering in our High ORAC Synbiotic.

The outcome of the study showed that Staphlococcus, E coli, Salmonella were inhibited, while lactic acid bacteria such as L. rhamnosus was not effected.  This is particularly important because the increased incidence of antibiotic resistant strains of the above pathogens.  Staph. aureus, the most dangerous of drug resistant pathogens was well inhibited by this collection (Puupponen‐Pimiä, 2005).

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species.

Per capsule: A minimum of 25 billion CFU (Colony Forming Units) of probiotics and a high ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbent Capacity) score of 3000 from the berry phenolics.  The extracts include blueberry, bilberry and grape seed extracts along with other whole berries, quercetin and resveratrol.

High ORAC final 2

References

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Recent studies show that dietary polyphenols support the growth of good bacteria in the gut while inhibiting pathogenic bacteria.

Dueñas et al.’s (2015) study entitled, A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols, showed that dietary polyphenols contribute to the maintenance of intestinal health by preserving the gut microbial balance through the stimulation of beneficial bacteria (i.e., Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) and the inhibition of pathogenic bacteria, exerting prebiotic-like effects.

One of the many beneficial effects attributed to dietary polphenols is due to phenolic metabolites formed in the gastrointestinal tract through the interaction with good lactic acid bacteria. The outcome is the formation of more good bacteria and the inhibition of various pathogenic bacteria and yeast.

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. Per capsule: A minimum a 25 billion probiotics and a high ORAC score of 3000.


High ORAC final 2

References

  • Duda-Chodak, A., Tarko, T., Satora, P., & Sroka, P. (2015). Interaction of dietary compounds, especially polyphenols, with the intestinal microbiota: a review. European journal of nutrition54(3), 325-341. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-015-0852-y
  • Dueñas, M., Muñoz-González, I., Cueva, C., Jiménez-Girón, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Santos-Buelga, C., … & Bartolomé, B. (2015). A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols. BioMed research international2015. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2015/850902/
  • Gupta, A., Dwivedi, M., Mahdi, A. A., Gowda, G. N., Khetrapal, C. L., & Bhandari, M. (2012). Inhibition of adherence of multi-drug resistant E. coli by proanthocyanidin. Urological research, 40(2), 143-150. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00240-011-0398-2
  • Heinonen, M. (2007). Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics–a Finnish perspective. Molecular nutrition & food research, 51(6), 684-691. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mnfr.200700006/full
  • Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s
  • Nohynek, L. J., Alakomi, H. L., Kähkönen, M. P., Heinonen, M., Helander, I. M., Oksman-Caldentey, K. M., & Puupponen-Pimiä, R. H. (2006). Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens. Nutrition and cancer, 54(1), 18-32.
  • Puupponen‐Pimiä, R., Nohynek, L., Hartmann‐Schmidlin, S., Kähkönen, M., Heinonen, M., Määttä‐Riihinen, K., & Oksman‐Caldentey, K. M. (2005). Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens. Journal of applied microbiology, 98(4), 991-1000.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02547.x/full

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Think better with blueberry

January 22, 2018

Dear Friends
Blueberry Extract
The CNS (the brain and spinal cord) is particulary vulnerable to oxidative stress, and this vulnerability increases during ageing (Joseph et al, 1998).  In fact as Dr. Joseph put it, “the brain becomes a hot bed of free radical activity in our old age.”

Shukitt-Hale et al. (2015) demonsrated in her research titled, The beneficial effects of berries on cognition, motor behaviour and neuronal function in ageing, the powerful cognitive effects by adding blueberry extract and strawberry extract to the diets of senile old rats.

The results showed that rats consuming the berry diets exhibited enhanced motor performance and improved cognition, specifically working memory. In addition, the rats supplemented with blueberry and strawberry diets showed increased hippocampal neurogenesis and expression of insulin-like growth factor 1.

What about research today on the bioavailability of blueberry polyphenols and their beneficial effect with human subjects?

Sandhu et al. (2017) explored the metabolic fate of blueberry anthocyanins after daily (90 days) supplementation of freeze-dried blueberry (equivalent of 1 cup of fresh blueberries).  Their conclusion was that blueberry anthocyanins are absorbed and extensively metablized resulting in the production of various phenolic acid derivatives and their conjugates, all together contributing to the bioavailability and beneficial effects associated with blueberry comsumption.

Miller et al. (2017) studied men and women between the ages of 60 and 75 years. Their findings showed that the group consuming the equivalent of one cup of blueberries daily for 90 days exhibited significantly fewer errors in a verbal learning test and increased mental flexibility on a task-switching test, relative to the placebo group.

BioImmersion powerhouses for polyphenolics supplementation for a healthy brain: 

References

  • Joseph, J. A., Denisova, N., Fisher, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Bickford, P., Prior, R., & Cao, G. (1998). Age-related neurodegeneration and oxidative stress: putative nutritional intervention. Neurologic clinics, 16(3), 747-755.
  • Joseph, J. A., Denisova, N., Fisher, D., Shukitt‐Hale, B., Bickford, P., Prior, R., & Cao, G. (1998). Membrane and receptor modifications of oxidative stress vulnerability in aging: nutritional considerations. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 854(1), 268-276.
  • Miller, M. G., Hamilton, D. A., Joseph, J. A., & Shukitt-Hale, B. (2017). Dietary blueberry improves cognition among older adults in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. European Journal of Nutrition, 1-12.
  • Sandhu, A., Miller, M. G., Shukitt-Hale, B., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B. (2017). Metabolic Fate of Blueberry Anthocyanins after Chronic Supplementation in Healthy Older Adults. The FASEB Journal, 31(1 Supplement), 646-20.
  • Shukitt-Hale, B., Bielinski, D. F., Lau, F. C., Willis, L. M., Carey, A. N., & Joseph, J. A. (2015). The beneficial effects of berries on cognition, motor behaviour and neuronal function in ageing. British Journal of Nutrition, 114(10), 1542-154.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3
Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy. 

The human heart is the first home of democracy. It is where we embrace our questions. Can we be equitable? Can we be generous? Can we listen with our whole beings ….

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Endotoxemia and Chlorella

December 14, 2017

Dear Friends

Chlorella HZ 2

Chlorella and inulin reduce endotoxemia and protect the intestinal mucosa barrier.

What is an endotoxin, and what causes endotoxemia? How does chlorella reduce endotoxemia, and how does inulin produce a healthy microbiome?  Let’s take a look at a few studies.

An endotoxin is often used synonymously with LPS.  Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Rietschel et al. found in 1994 that LPSs induce strong inflammatory responses from the immune systems of all animals.

Liver Diseases are associated with leaky gut syndrome, which allows for the passage LPS molecules into the systemic circulation, causing chronic inflammation, and a condition called endotoxemia. A large enough load of LPSs in the systemic circulations can cause septic shock.

In fact, severe sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition, with as many deaths annually as those from acute myocardial infarction. It is especially common in the elderly and is likely to increase substantially as the U.S. population ages (Angus et al., 2001)

Bedirli et al. (2009) investigated the role of different microalgae (Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp.) extracts in intestinal barrier function and oxidative stress in experimentally jaundice rats.

The main outcomes measured were endotoxin concentrations in plasma [e.g. LPS levels], evidence of bacterial translocation in mesenteric lymph nodes and liver oxidative stress, and histology.

Their findings: A Chlorella sp. supplemented diet significantly demonstrated protective effects on the intestinal mucosa barrier in obstructive jaundice, and reduced intestinal translocation of bacteria and endotoxin.  Spirulina had no significant effect.

Original copyCani et al. (2008) found that a high animal fat diet changes the GI tract microbiome into a population of increasing numbers of Gram-negative bacteria, which raises the level of LPS endotoxins within the gut lumen and allows their passing through the GI tract membrane into the plasma.

The research team concluded that the plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) controls the inflammatory tone of the body.  This means that high concentrations of LPS set the stage for endotoxemia, resulting in metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes, CVD) and cancer.

They further demonstrated in the study that increased fibers in the diet, such as inulin, increase the populations of Bifidobacterial sp. and Lactobacillus sp. which reduce both the load of Gram-negative bacteria and the permeability of the gastrointestinal membrane.

Our Suggestion: Take 4 to 8 tablets of Organic Chlorella daily.
Take 1 tsp. of Original Synbiotic daily.
References:

  • Angus, D. C., Linde-Zwirble, W. T., Lidicker, J., Clermont, G., Carcillo, J., & Pinsky, M. R. (2001). Epidemiology of severe sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care. Critical care medicine, 29(7), 1303-1310.
  • Bedirli, A., Kerem, M., Ofluoglu, E., Salman, B., Katircioglu, H., Bedirli, N., … & Pasaoglu, H. (2009). Administration of Chlorella sp. microalgae reduces endotoxemia, intestinal oxidative stress and bacterial translocation in experimental biliary obstruction. Clinical nutrition, 28(6), 674-678.
  • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-8.
  • Rietschel, E. T., Kirikae, T., Schade, F. U., Mamat, U., Schmidt, G., Loppnow, H., … & Di Padova, F. (1994). Bacterial endotoxin: molecular relationships of structure to activity and function. The FASEB Journal, 8(2), 217-225.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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What kind of world do you want to wake up to 30 years from now?
The Biomimicry Institute aspires to a world where what we make is inspired by, and connected to, the natural world.  This means cities are resilient, emission targets are achieved, and industrial processes create healthy air, water, and soil.  It also means all species are thriving because our human designs restore the planet as nature’s desgns do.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved