Gastrointestinal Support

What works for sepsis?

September 27, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                   SN Front Low Rez copy

Severe sepsis is a common, expensive, and frequently fatal condition, with as many deaths annually as those from acute myocardial infarction. It is especially common in the elderly and is likely to increase substantially as the U.S. population ages (Angus et al., 2001).

The health benefits of probiotics and synbiotics are well established in healthy adults, but what of their role in preventing postoperative sepsis?  This is the question that Arumugam, Lau, and Chamberlain sought an answer for in their 2016 meta-analysis which assessed the impact of probiotics and synbiotics on the incidence of postoperative sepsis in gastrointestinal surgical patients.

As the title of their study indicates— “Probiotics and synbiotics decrease postoperative sepsis in elective gastrointestinal surgical patients:  a meta-analysis” — their answer is affirmative.

A comprehensive literature search of all published randomized control trials (RCTs) was conducted with 15 RCTs meeting their selecting criteria in which 1201 patients were involved (192 receiving probiotics, 413 receiving synbiotics, and 596 receiving placebo) and analyzed.

Overall, probiotics and synbiotic uses significantly reduced the risk of developing postoperative sepsis by 38%.  Their conclusion was that probiotic/synbiotic supplementation is a valuable adjunct in the care of patients undergoing GI surgery.

The Supernatant Synbiotic contains:  15.75 billion cfu/cap of certified strains of Traditional Bulgarian pedigreed probiotics. They are B. longum, L. casei, L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus (multi-strain) and S. thermophilus (multi-strain) along with Supernatant (inactive probiotic cell populations of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus and their metabolites) plus inulin (derived from organic chicory root fiber).

Suggested supplementation: 1-2 capsules daily.
LactORN LRez jpeg 3
The LactORN contains:  the probiotic Lactobacillus casei grown in a way to retain its natural oligoribonucleotides (ORNs). Plus it contains the prebiotic inulin derived from organic chicory root.  Think of it as your immune boosting tool. Across animal species, the LactORN has been shown to support immune system competencies to prevent infections caused by viruses and bacteria. It also helps the body to protect itself from toxins.  Plus it helps to keep the adaptive immune system from overreacting into septic shock (Marshall, 2007).

Suggested supplementation: 1 level tsp per week (dissolve in mouth).

References:

  • Angus, D. C., Linde-Zwirble, W. T., Lidicker, J., Clermont, G., Carcillo, J., & Pinsky, M. R. (2001). Epidemiology of severe sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care. Critical care medicine, 29(7), 1303-1310.
  • Arumugam, S., Lau, C. S., & Chamberlain, R. S. (2016). Probiotics and synbiotics decrease postoperative sepsis in elective gastrointestinal surgical patients: a meta-analysis. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 20(6), 1123-1131.
  • Marshall W. (2007). Oligoribonucleotides alert the immune system of animals to the imminence of microbial infections. US patent 7,189,834 B2

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Original copy
The Original Synbiotic is a daily probiotic for the whole family.

The Original probiotics are researched pedigreed strains of lactic acid bacteria that support the development of a healthy GI tract microbiome.

A healthy gut microbiome is dependent on strong and proven probiotics, such as the Original strains. The Original Synbiotic provides a powerful symbiotic combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Streptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 19258), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and Bifidobacterium longum (ATCC 15707).

Our chosen probiotics are foundational ATCC strains shown in research to work together with human cells to perform many functions in the body. For example, these probiotic strains help the digestive system, support and balance the immune system, and enhance our nervous system by producing neurotransmitters. They reinforce the GI barrier function to protect us from xenobiotics and pathogens, even binding heavy metals. Moreover, they neutralize carcinogens such as those caused by heterocyclic amines found in blackened meat and elements such as nitrosamines in sausage. By acidifying the epithelial membrane, they enable the absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium more readily. And lastly, our chosen strains also support the important task of daily regularity (Syngia et al., 2016; Hardy et al., 2013; Figueroa‐González et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2009).

The Original Synbiotic suggested daily dose: one tsp daily.

Of the many beneficial functions needed to be performed by our probiotic friends, colonizing the GI tract membrane and thereby protecting from our body from pathogens and xenobiotics, is very important. Check out these studies on colonization (Toscano et al., 2017; Underwood et al., 2015; Panigrahi et al., 2008; De Champs et al., 2003; Sarem- Damerdji et al., 1995).

See the Original Synbiotic Monograph.

References:

  • De Champs, C., Maroncle, N., Balestrino, Damien., Rich, C., Forestier, C. (2003). Persistence of Colonization of Intestinal Mucosa by A Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus casei subsp rhamnosus Lcr35, after Oran Consumption. J Com Microbiol; 41(3): 1270-1273.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC150315/
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Panigrahi, P., Pradhan, L., Mohapatra, S.S., Misra, P.R., Johnson, J.A., Chaudhry, R., Taylor, S., Hanse, N.I., Gewolb, I.H. (2008). Long-term colonization of a Lactobacillus plantarum synbiotic preparation in the neonatal gut. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 47(1):45-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607268
  • Sarem-Damerdji, L., Sarem, F., Marchal, L., Micolas, J.P. (1995). In vitro colonization ability of human colon mucosa by exogenous Lactobacillus strains. FEMS Microbiology Letters; 131(2):133-137. https://academic.oup.com/femsle/article-abstract/131/2/133/524865/In-vitro-colonization-ability-of-human-colon?redirectedFrom=PDF
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of food science and technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Toscano, M., De Grandi, R., Stronati, L., De Vecchi, E., & Drago, L. (2017). Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the healthy gut microbiota composition at phyla and species level: A preliminary study. World journal of gastroenterology, 23(15), 2696.
  • Underwood, M. A., German, J. B., Lebrilla, C. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut. Pediatric research, 77, 229.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350908/

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3In today’s world the level of assault on our bodies from pollution, pathogens, and stress is so high that we need powerful food supplements.  Our bodies, after all, know exactly what and how to utilize food for therapeutic purposes.

At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

The New High ORAC Synbiotic

September 18, 2017

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
We are very excited to present to you our High ORAC Synbiotic.  It’s back with an enhanced formula and a new look—a beautiful new label.

What’s new?

A higher probiotics count:  We’ve increased the CFUs (Colony Forming Units) to 25 billion per capsule.

More berries and extracts: We have added Quercetin, Resveratrol, and Strawberry.

Higher ORAC value:  The berry mixture provides 3000 ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbent Capacity)!

Let’s look at the new proprietary blend per capsule:

  • L. acidophilus & B. longum– 250mg
  • Grape Seed Extract, Wild Blueberry, Quercetin, Resveratrol, Wild Bliberry, Cranberry, Tart Cherry, Prune, Raspberry Seed, Strawberry & Inulin- 250mg.

Please notice that underneather the High ORAC Synbiotic name on the label it say:  “Post Antibiotic Care”.  (See Food Science and the References below for the scientific  conversation on this topic.)

Food Science:

The problem with antibiotics is that along with killing off the bad bacteria, antibiotics also kill the good gut bacteria — the protective bacteria such as Lactobaccilus and Bifidobacteria.  For many years researchers have warned us that antibiotics destroy the protective layer of good bacteria on our gut membrane, resulting in chronic inflammation (Barbut,f. & Petit, J.C., 2001; Bergogne-Berezin, E., 2000).

Both the Bifidobacteria longum and the Lactobacillus acidophilus strains are used in the High ORAC Synbiotic Formula to re-colonize and protect the GI membrane after antibiotic therapy. Bifidobacteria longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus colonize the GI tract membrane, thereby blocking out the pathogens; and also kill pathogenic microorganisms by producing antimicrobial peptides (bacterocins) against them (Hickson et al., 2007; Syngai et al., 2016).

The large offering of berry polyphenols, organic acids, and other phytochemicals offer a powerful antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory support (Grace et al., 2014; Nohynek et al., 2006) . Along with the inulin (a soluble fiber derived from organic chicory root), berries are also a great prebiotic for these good lactic acid bacteria (Puupponen-Pimia et al., 2005; Vendrame et al., 2011). (See the links to the references below for scientific support.)

References:

  • Barbut, F., & Petit, J. C. (2001). Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile‐associated infections. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 7(8), 405-410.
  • Bergogne-Berezin, E. (2000). Treatment and prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhea. International journal of antimicrobial agents, 16(4), 521-526.
  • Cardona, F., Andrés-Lacueva, C., Tulipani, S., Tinahones, F. J., & Queipo-Ortuño, M. I. (2013). Benefits of polyphenols on gut microbiota and implications in human health. The Journal of nutritional biochemistry, 24(8), 1415-1422. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955286313000946
  • Cremonini FI, Di Caro SI, Nista EC, Bartolozzi F, Capelli GI, Gasbarrini G, Gasbarrini AN. (2002). Meta‐analysis: the effect of probiotic administration on antibiotic‐associated diarrhoea. Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics, 16(8), 1461-1467.
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi: 10.1021/jf403810y.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Haslam, E., Lilley, T. H., Warminski, E., Liao, H., Cai, Y., Martin, R., … & Luck, G. (1992). Polyphenol complexation: a study in molecular recognition. ACS Publications.
  • Hattori, M., Kusumoto, I. T., Namba, T., Ishigami, T., & Hara, Y. (1990). Effect of tea polyphenols on glucan synthesis by glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus mutans. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 38(3), 717-720.
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Kemperman, R.A., Bolca, S., Roger, L.C., Vaughan, E.E. (2010). Novel approaches for analysing gut microbes and dietary polyphenols: challenges and opportunities
    Microbiology, 156 (11), pp. 3224-3231
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Nohynek, L. J., Alakomi, H. L., Kähkönen, M. P., Heinonen, M., Helander, I. M., Oksman-Caldentey, K. M., & Puupponen-Pimiä, R. H. (2006). Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens. Nutrition and cancer, 54(1), 18-32.
  • Puupponen-Pimiä, R., Nohynek, L., Hartman-Schmidlin, S., Kähkönen, M. Heinonen, M., Mata-Riihinen, K. et al.(2005). Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens.  J. Appl Microbiol, 98, pp. 991-1000
  • Sirk, T. W., Friedman, M., & Brown, E. F. (2011). Molecular binding of black tea theaflavins to biological membranes: relationship to bioactivities. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 59(8), 3780-3787.
  • Sirk, T. W., Brown, E. F., Friedman, M., & Sum, A. K. (2009). Molecular binding of catechins to biomembranes: relationship to biological activity. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 57(15), 6720-6728.
  • Stapleton, P. D., Shah, S., Ehlert, K., Hara, Y., & Taylor, P. W. (2007). The β-lactam-resistance modifier (−)-epicatechin gallate alters the architecture of the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. Microbiology, 153(7), 2093-2103.
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of Food Science and Technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Vendrame, S., & Klimis-Zacas, D. (2015). Anti-inflammatory effect of anthocyanins via modulation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades. Nutr Rev, 73(6), 348-58. DOI:10.1093/nutrit/nuu066.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Bacteria in an average human body number ten times more than human cells, for a total of about 1000 more genes than are present in the human genome.  An ever-growing number of studies have demonstrated that changes in the composition of our microbiomes correlate with numerous disease states, raising the possibility that manipulation of these communities could be used to treat disease.   Check out NIH’s the Human Microbiome Projects 2017 website.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Cox and fellow researchers concluded in their paper, Lactobacillus casei Abundance is Associated with Profound Shifts in the Infant Gut Microbiome, that supplementing infants with Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus is positively associated with the promotion of a stable, even, and functionally redundant infant gastrointestinal community; and the reduced risk of atopy and asthma later in life (Cox et al., 2010).

Cox et al. (2010) hypothesize that Lactobacillus casei subsp. Rhamnosus  promote a clustering (a consortium of bugs that work well together) of known probiotic species within the infant gut that are more resistant to perturbation and outgrowth of pathogens (See Food Science below).

A randomized, controlled, double-blind study of 159 newborns, found that early feeding of Lactobacillus casei decrease the rate of atopic dermatitis at age two by 50% (Kalliomaki et al., 2001) and that this protective effect was sustained past infancy (Kalliomaki et al., 2003).

Colonization of the infant gut microorganisms over the first year of life is crucial for development of a balanced immune response; and, early alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota of neonates has been linked with subsequent development of asthma and atopy in older children (Cox et al., 2010).

Therapeutic Food Protocol for the Neonate LactORN Bottle 2

  • LactORN– 1/8th of a tsp twice a week (one way is to offer LactORN on your fingertip).

Comment:  LactORN contains Lactobacillius casei rhamnosus. LactOrn is blended with inulin derived from organic chicory root, functioning as an important prebiotic fiber.  It has a naturally sweet taste that babies and adults love.

Others of our synbiotic formulas, that have proven to be powerful probiotic formulas for children, are the Original Synbiotic, the Beta Glucan Synbiotic, and the Supernatant Synbiotic.  Click on their links to see their ingredients.  They all contain L. casei rhamnosus plus other good bugs that L. casei promotes a clustering for a healthy and stronger microbiome.

Food Science

Cox et al.’s (2010)  research question centered upon whether the demonstrable positive effects of L. casei rhamnosus was the result of a species-specific increase in relative abundance that accounts for its protective benefits, or, if there is a global effect on the complex GI microbial consortium.  In other words, is it the L. casei rhamnosus all by itself that is doing the disease-reducing work? Or, is it the presence of L. casei that somehow promotes the growth of other good probiotic organisms, and all together as a consortium (cluster) they protect and enhence the baby’s microbiome. They concluded it was the later, it takes a village to raise a baby!

Analysis of the phylogenetic (physical form/identity) differences characteristic of samples with high L. casei rhamnosus revealed a large number of taxa (families of organism) increased in relative abundance in these communities.  These included a number of known beneficial species belonging to the Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae.  Community phylogenetic metrics demonstrated that the promoted taxa were strongly phylogenetically related; and, suggests functional redundancy with GI communities that possess L. casei rhamnosus in high abundance.

In summary the Cox et al. L. casei rhamnosus study demonstrates that high abundance of this probiotic organism is associated with a dramatic change in GI microbial community composition in infants, impacting the relative abundance of a large number of taxa that can be beneficial in reducing the risk of allergy and atopy later in life.

References

  • Cox, M.J., Huang, Y.J., Huang Y.J., Fujimura, K.E., Liu, J.T., McKean, M., Boushey, H.A., Segal, M.R., Brodie, E.L., Cabana, M.D., Lynch, S.V. (2010). Lactobacillus casei Abundance Is Associated with Profound Shifts in the Infant Gut Microbiome. PLOS| one; Tenth Anniversary. Full paper.
  • Kalliomaki, M., Salminen, S., Arvilommi, H., Kero, P., Koskinen, P. et al (2001). Probiotic in primary prevention of atopic disease: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Lancet; 357: 1076-1079.
  • Kalliomaki, M., Salminen, S., Poussa, T., Arvilommi, H., Isolauri, E. (2003). Probiotics and prevention of atopic disease: 4-year follow-up of a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Lancet; 361: 1869-18

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3
Watch the new trailer An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.    The sequel to An Inconvenient Truth.  In theatres July 28, 2017.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Regularity for Children

March 17, 2017

Dear Friends

Chronic constipation in our young population is a growing concern for parents and doctors.

Much of the discussion in the scientific community is focused upon fiber. We have formulated the Be Regular with five organic and gluten free seeds:  Amaranth, Buckwheat, Chia, Millet and Quinoa.

These seeds are ancient! They have been with us for thousands of years and globally used as foundational foods. Rich in both soluble and insoluble fibers, they contain essential nutrients such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates with an overall low glycemic index.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

Food Science

Lee and associates (2008) researched the bowel habits of 368 children aged 3-5years from kindergartens in Hong Kong.  Constipation was confirmed by Rome-criteria.  Consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole-grain cereals, and fluid were determined using a 3-day food record.

A total of 28.8% children were reported to have constipation. Median dietary fiber intake of constipated children was significantly lower than non-constipated.  Constipated children also had significantly lower intakes of vitamin C, folate and magnesium.  Fruit intake and total plant foods intake were significantly lower in the constipated than non-constipated children.

The authors conclusion was insufficient dietary fiber intake is common in Hong Kong pre-school children. And that constipated children had significantly lower intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients which was attributed to the under-consumption of plant foods.

We have known fiber is central for regularity for a long time. Almost two decades ago, a study by Morais (1999) evaluated the fiber intake of children with chronic constipation using two tables of fiber composition of foods, a Brazilian table that counts values of soluble and insoluble fiber, and a table based on the method of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC).

The researcher’s results determined that the total fiber intake of the constipated children was lower than the control group of children with daily, healthy bowel moments.  The Brazilian table showed that the lower consumption of total fiber was attributable to a low intake of insoluble fiber whereas the intake of soluble fiber was not significantly different between the two groups.

Bibliography

  • Lee, W.T., Ip, K.S., Chan, J.S., Lui, N.W., & Young, B.W. (2008). Increased prevalence of constipation in pre-school children is attributable to under-consumption of plant foods: a community-based study. J Paediatr Child Health, 44,170–175.
  • Morais, M.B., Vítolo, M.R., Aguirre, A.N., & Fagundes-Neto, U. (1999). Measurement of low dietary fiber intake as a risk factor for chronic constipation in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 29, 132–135.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3More that ever we need to tune in, learn from and support organizations like The Environmental Working Group.  Here is their 2017 Dirty Dozen.  EWG’s analysis of tests by the U.S. Deparment of Agriculture found that nearly 70 percent of samples of 48 types of conventionally grown produce were contaminated with pesticide residues.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved