Gastrointestinal Support

Dear Friends

What is the connection between the microbiome and heart heatlh? The microbiome’s metabolites are emerging as the deciding influence for good or bad health. We will dive into this topic in the next couple of weeks (check green facts below).

BG photoAs Dr. JoAnn Manson, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital says in Healthy gut, Healthy Heart(2018):

There’s a complex interplay between the microbes in our intestines and most of the systems in our bodies, including the vascular, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  All of these relationships are highly relevant to cardiovascular health.

What we eat plays a major role in the composition of our gut microbiota.  And we’re learning more about how the substances gut microbes churn out (called metabolites) influence our risk for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

The Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic: Cardio-Metabolic Support is a great product for seeding the gut with good pedigreed bacteria and prebiotic fibers that strongly support the integrity of the GI tract membrane, support the reduction of GI tract inflammation, support the strengthening and balancing of the immune system.

Probiotics are found in research to positively effect heart health (Kassaian et al., 2017; Sáez-Lara et al., 2016; DiRienzo, 2014; Delzenne et al., 2011; Saini et al., 2010), with many researchers positing the connection between heart and gut health (Serino et al., 2014; Huang et al., 2013).*

Oats and oat beta glucan have enjoyed a rich cultural historicity and extensive research on heart health (Andersson & Hellstrand, 2012).  Oats and oat beta glucan are found to reduce serum LDL cholesterol (Ho et al., 2016; Zhu et al., 2015; Whitehead et al., 2014; Wolever et al., 2010), improve liver function (Chang et al., 2013), and promote bowel regularity (Clemens, 2012; Mobley et al., 2014).*

Red beetroot offer a rich source of phyto-nutrients, including ascorbic acid (vitamin C), carotenoids, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Beets provide a source of dietary nitrate, shown in research to have important implication for heart health (Kapil et al., 2014). Beet’s nutrients are shown to prevent oxidation of LDLs, lower triglycerides, and balances blood pressure (Clifford et al., 2015; Eggenbeen et al., 2016; Hobbs et al., 2013).*

Inulin from organic chicory root supplies food for the probiotic organisms. Probiotic organisms need fiber to grow and multiply. See Slavin (2013) on fiber as prebiotics, and Dehghan et al. (2013) on inulin and cardiovascular support.*  Together with probiotic, inulin is also found in research to help tighten cell junctions, which is thought to aid against leaky gut syndrome (Cani et al., 2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009).*

The Beta Glucan was formulated to nourish both heart and gut into health.*

Bibliography:

  • Kassaian, N., Aminorroaya, A., Feizi, A., Jafari, P., Amini, M. (2017). The effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on metabolic syndrome indices in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trial, 18(1), 148. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-017-1885-8
  • Sáez-Lara, M.J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F.J., Plaza-Diaz, J., Gil, A.(2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci, 17(6).DOI: 10.3390/ijms17060928
  • DiRienzo D.B. (2014). Effect of probiotics on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: implications for heart-healthy diets. Nutr Rev, 72(1), 18-29. DOI: 10.1111/nure.12084
  • Delzenne, N.M., Neyrinck, A.M., Cani, P.D.(2011). Modulation of the gut microbiota by nutrients with prebiotic properties: consequences for host health in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Microb Cell Fact, 10 Suppl 1, S10. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2859-10-S1-S10
  • Saini, R., Saini, S., & Sharma, S. (2010). Potential of probiotics in controlling cardiovascular diseases. J.Cardiovasc Dis Res,1(4), 213-214. DOI: 10.4103/0975-3583.74267
  • Serino, M., Blasco-Baque, V., Nicolas, S., & Burcelin, R. (2014). Far from the Eyes, Close to the Heart: Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Cardiovasuclar Consequences. Curr Cardiol Rep, 16(11), 540. DOI: 10.1007/s11886-014-0540-1
  • Huang, Y., Wang, X., Wang, J., Wu, F., Sui, Y., Yang, L., Wang, Z. (2013). Lactobacillus plantarum strains as potential probiotic cultures with cholesterol-lowering activity. J Dairy Sci, 96(5), 2746-53.DOI: 10.3168/jds.2012-6123
  • Anderson, K.E., & Hellstrand, P. (2012). Dietary oats and modulation of atherogenic pathways. Mol Nutr Food Res, 56(7), 1003-13. DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201100706
  • Ho, H.V., Sievenpiper, J.L., Zurbau, A., Blanco Mejia, S., Jovanovski, E., Au-Yeung, F… Vuksan, V. (2016). The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials. Br J Nutr. 116(8):1369-1382. DOI: 10.1017/S000711451600341X
  • Zhu, X., Sun, X., Wang, M., Zhang, C., Cao, Y., Mo, G., Liang, J., Zhu, S. (2015).Quantitative assessment of the effects of beta-glucan consumption on serum lipid profile and glucose level in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis, 25(8), 714-23.DOI: 10.1016/j.numecd.2015.04.008
  • Whitehead A, Beck EJ, Tosh S, Wolever TM. (2014). Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr, 100(6), 1413-21.DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086108


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Healthy Gut, Healthy Heart:  How the trillions of bacteria in your intestinal tract play a role in your cardiovascular health.

Metabolomics—the study of metabolites—is an emerging scientific discipline of great importance for bettering our understanding of the connection of our GI tract microbiome and the health of our body. More on this topic next week.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved
Dear Friends

Did you know that polyphenols from berries and plants are the most favored foods for the probiotics genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the gut?

The berries and plants enhance the growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium inside the gut microbiome, while inhibiting many pathogenic organsims.

For example, Possemiers et al.’s (2011)  “The intestinal microbioime: a separate organ inside the body with the metabolic potential to influence the bioactivity of botanicals,” explains that rich polyphenolic molecules from berries and plants are broken down by probiotic organisms into many important sub-molecules that are more bioavailable yet still contain their classic polyphenolic structure to serve the body as antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, anti cancer, anti diabetes and more  … no wonder berries and plants are the preferred prebiotics foods for the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria!

 

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily
Phyto Power Photo 6

  • Three species of Rosehip, wildcrafted, whole fruit and seeds (100% w/w), refractory dried, three Rosa species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Dandelion, wildcrafted, aerial parts (90% w/w), root (10% w/w) with flower, refractory dried, four Taraxacum species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Blueberry, wildcrafted, fruit (>90% w/w), leaves and stem (<5% w/w), refractory dried, four Vaccinium species, 100mg per capsule.

 

 

Original Synbiotic: 1 tsp. dailyOriginal Photo 4

Contains:  20 billion cfu/tsp of certified strains of pedigreed probiotics (L. acidophilus,  B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and S. thermophilus) and 3.5 grams of inulin derived from organic chicory fiber.  Advanced freeze-drying technology.

120 grams/bottle. 4 grams/ tsp.  Dairy free.  Soy free. Gluten free. No excipients.

References

 

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Autism and Clostridia

February 24, 2018

Dear Friends

Research ascribes various etiologies to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  There are exogenous factors such as iatrogenic drugs, pollutants of various kinds, and over use of antibiotics; and there are the endogenous factors such as dysbiosis of the GI Tract, mitochondrial dysfunction, and of course genetics. Interestingly, genetic causation is found to be in the low percentile, whereas dybiosis and mitochondrial dysfunction conditions present major links to ASD.

Let’s focus on dysbiosis.  Overgrowth of clostridia, bacteriodes, and desulfovibrio are all ASD-associated bacterial populations. The overuse of antibiotics enables the clostridial family of bacteria to dominate because their spore forming ability resist many antibiotics and they can easily gain a foothold over good bacteria.

Clostridia is a big producer of the SCFA propionate. Too much propionate in the systemic circulation (which is able to cross the blood-brain barrier) becomes neurological and mitochondrial toxins, disrupting and causing the very symptoms that we see with autistic patients.

There is strong support in the literature for foundational probiotic organisms that reduce the overload of clostridium. These are the organisms we have chosen for our probiotics.

Research is showing that L. plantarum, L. casei rhamnosus, B. longum and even L. acidophilus can put out bacterocins against clostridia.  Doctors who have used our Original Synbiotic and our Supernatant Synbiotic (either one works) found improvement in the behaviors of ASD patients.

I would recommend adding Phyto Power for the high potency of polyphenolics grown in remote Alaskan regions. Phenols are shown in research as antimicrobials, inhibiting many pathogenic organisms including those implicated in ASD, yet at the same time, they enhance both the growth of the Bifido and Lactobacillus genera.

I suggest the following dosage:

Original Synbiotic: up to 1 tsp. daily. With very young patients start with an eight of a tsp and work up slowly adjusting the dosage. Back off just a little from a dosage that causes reaction. You be able to get up to a tsp dose in about a month of gradually ratcheting it up.

As a reminder this product contains L. plantarum, L. casei rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, B. longum and S. thermophiles plus organic chicory root inulin which is very bifido and lacto genic.  Each of the organism are good butyrate produces, and as we know, butyrate helps to heal a leaky gut which is a big problem for ASD patients.

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily (if they can’t take capsules then just open up the capsule and take the powder directly).

References

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens.

Such is the title of Puupponen‐Pimiä et al.’s (2005) research on berry phenolics.  The purpose of the their study was to determine the effects of berries and berry phenolics on selected pathogenic gastrointestinal bacteria and to identify single phenolic compounds possessing antimicrobial activity.

Phenolic’s antimicrobial activity has gained importance as phenolic berry extracts inhibit the growth of selected Gram-negative intestinal bacteria and are not active against Gram-positive beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria (Puupponen-Pimiä et al. 2001).

The study includes a selection of Scandanavian berries whose collective polyphenolic content is similiar to what is present in the offering in our High ORAC Synbiotic.

The outcome of the study showed that Staphlococcus, E coli, Salmonella were inhibited, while lactic acid bacteria such as L. rhamnosus was not effected.  This is particularly important because the increased incidence of antibiotic resistant strains of the above pathogens.  Staph. aureus, the most dangerous of drug resistant pathogens was well inhibited by this collection (Puupponen‐Pimiä, 2005).

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species.

Per capsule: A minimum of 25 billion CFU (Colony Forming Units) of probiotics and a high ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbent Capacity) score of 3000 from the berry phenolics.  The extracts include blueberry, bilberry and grape seed extracts along with other whole berries, quercetin and resveratrol.

High ORAC final 2

References

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Recent studies show that dietary polyphenols support the growth of good bacteria in the gut while inhibiting pathogenic bacteria.

Dueñas et al.’s (2015) study entitled, A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols, showed that dietary polyphenols contribute to the maintenance of intestinal health by preserving the gut microbial balance through the stimulation of beneficial bacteria (i.e., Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) and the inhibition of pathogenic bacteria, exerting prebiotic-like effects.

One of the many beneficial effects attributed to dietary polphenols is due to phenolic metabolites formed in the gastrointestinal tract through the interaction with good lactic acid bacteria. The outcome is the formation of more good bacteria and the inhibition of various pathogenic bacteria and yeast.

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. Per capsule: A minimum a 25 billion probiotics and a high ORAC score of 3000.


High ORAC final 2

References

  • Duda-Chodak, A., Tarko, T., Satora, P., & Sroka, P. (2015). Interaction of dietary compounds, especially polyphenols, with the intestinal microbiota: a review. European journal of nutrition54(3), 325-341. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-015-0852-y
  • Dueñas, M., Muñoz-González, I., Cueva, C., Jiménez-Girón, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Santos-Buelga, C., … & Bartolomé, B. (2015). A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols. BioMed research international2015. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2015/850902/
  • Gupta, A., Dwivedi, M., Mahdi, A. A., Gowda, G. N., Khetrapal, C. L., & Bhandari, M. (2012). Inhibition of adherence of multi-drug resistant E. coli by proanthocyanidin. Urological research, 40(2), 143-150. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00240-011-0398-2
  • Heinonen, M. (2007). Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics–a Finnish perspective. Molecular nutrition & food research, 51(6), 684-691. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mnfr.200700006/full
  • Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s
  • Nohynek, L. J., Alakomi, H. L., Kähkönen, M. P., Heinonen, M., Helander, I. M., Oksman-Caldentey, K. M., & Puupponen-Pimiä, R. H. (2006). Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens. Nutrition and cancer, 54(1), 18-32.
  • Puupponen‐Pimiä, R., Nohynek, L., Hartmann‐Schmidlin, S., Kähkönen, M., Heinonen, M., Määttä‐Riihinen, K., & Oksman‐Caldentey, K. M. (2005). Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens. Journal of applied microbiology, 98(4), 991-1000.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02547.x/full

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved