Cancer Support

Dear Friends

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and dietary habits account for a large percentage of the risk for developing CRC (Pitsouni et al., 2009)

Can probiotic supplementation help in the prevention of colorectal cancer?

Azcarate-Peril et al. (2011), The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer, examined the peer reviewed medical literature and conclude that probiotics help protect against the development of colorectal cancer.  In their article, New scientific paradigms for probiotics and prebiotics, Reid et al. (2003) come to the same conclusion.

Additionally, Liu et al. (2011), in their randomized clinical trial on L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, and B. longum, concluded that probiotic treatment on barrier function and postoperative infectious complications in colorectal cancer surgery demonstrated beneficial results.

Therapeutic Food Probiotics to support CRC: according to the research, take 6 days before surgery, and 10 days after surgery (Liu et al., 2011).

Both the Original and Supernatant are formulated with probiotics shown in research to confer beneficial results.

Click on any of the links above to learn more about the probiotic bacteria within each of the formulas.

References

  • Azcarate-Peril, M.A., Sikes, M., Bruno-Barcena, J.M. (2011). The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer? Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol, 301, G401-G424. doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00110.2011.
  • Liu, Z., Qin, H., Yang, Z., Xia, Y., Liu, W., Yang, J., Jiang, Y., Zhang, H., Wang, Y., Zheng, Q. (2011). Randomised clinical trial: the effects of perioperative probiotic treatment on barrier function and post-operative infectious complications in colorectal cancer surgery – a double-blind study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther, 33: 50–63, 2011.
  • Pitsouni, E., Alexiou, V., Saridakis, V., Peppas, G., Falagas, M.E. (2009). Does the use of probiotics/synbiotics prevent postoperative infections in patients undergoing abdominal surgery? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Eur J Clin Pharmacol65, 561–70. PubMed
  • Reid, G., Sanders, M.E., Gaskins, H.R., Gibson, G.R., Mercenier, A., Rastall, R., Roberfroid, M., Rowland, I., Cherbut, C., Klaenhammer, T.R. (2003). New scientific paradigms for probiotics and prebiotics. J Clin Gastroenterol, 37, 105–118.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Phyto Power and Cancer

April 19, 2017

Dear Friends

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder from Alaska.  Grown in harsh yet pure and fertile environments, Alaskan wild berries and plants are strong and potent (Grace et al., 2014).

Alaskan potent wildcrafted berries and plants supply an abundance of antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial factors shown to promote and maintain a healthy functioning body (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013).

In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high. Alaska wild berries ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values even increased.

There is abundance research in the peer-reviewed journals today on health benefits of the individual constituents within Phyto Power as being important to consider for a whole host of conditions—from metabolic syndrome, to cognitive decline, to fatty liver, to high blood pressure, etc … in this Forward Thinking we will focus on cancer.

Therapeutic Food Protocol for Cancer Support.

Food Science

Blueberries, Rose hip, and Dandelion show a great potential as a daily nutritional supplement due to vast research on their effect on different cancers. For example, blueberries are shown to inhibit growth and metastatic potential (Adams et al., 2010), and manage gastrointestinal tract cancers (Bishayee et al., 2016). Rose hip has shown to effect human brain cell proliferation (Cagle et al., 2012) and antiproliferation effect on Caco-2 human colon cancer (Jiménez et al., 2016), while Dandelion was found to induce apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells (Chatterjee et al., 2011; see also Hu et al., 2003 and Jeon et al., 2008, for further reading on dandelion). Research has shown great promise for their various effects on cancer.

Phyto Power is comprised of several species of wildcrafted blueberries, Rose hips, and Dandelions. Growing wild and strong in remote areas of Alaska, these berries and plants are handpicked at the peak of their phytonutrient potential. For centuries, indigenous tribes of Alaskan natives have used these power-filled berries and plants for their daily meals as well as ceremonial and medicinal purposes.

Phyto Power is potent because of its Alaskan red Rose hip fruit and seeds, blue-purple blueberries, with twigs and leaves, and the Dandelion’s green leaves, stems, roots, and yellow flowers. These vibrant phytochemicals protect and enhance the health of both plants and humans (Joseph, Nadeau, & Underwood, 2003). James Duke’s (2000) substantial USDA phytochemical database was compiled to illustrate how (and why) the world of plants heals and protects (p. 2).

Bibliography

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75.
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy,3(5), 13.
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045. doi: 10.1155/2011/129045.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537–552.
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi: 10.1021/jf403810y.
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82–88.
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136.
  • Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients? Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204.
  • Joseph, J., Nadeau, D., & Underwood, A. (2003). The color code: A revolutionary eating plan for optimum health. New York, NY: The Philip Lief Group, Inc.
  • Kristo, A.S., Klimis-Zacas, D., Sikalidis, A.K. (2016). Protective Role of Dietary Berries in Cancer. Antioxidants (Basel), 5(4), 37. doi:10.3390/antiox5040037
  • Ovadje, P., Ammar, S., Guerrero, J.A., Arnason, J.T., Pandey, S. (2016). Dandelion root extract affects colorectal cancer proliferation and survival through the activation of multiple death signalling pathways. Oncotarget, 7(45):73080-73100.
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. doi: 10.1021/jf400823s.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Watch the new trailer An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.    The sequel to An Inconvenient Truth.  In theatres July 28, 2017.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Meat and Colorectal Cancer

September 8, 2016

Dear Friends

The two most lethal cancers are lung and colorectal cancer, respectively.  Both are clearly associated with what we consume on a regular basis (Alberg, 2003; Cummings, 1979).
Approximately 750,000 Americans die each year from lung cancer. Yet 90% would have reduced the risk of getting cancer if they simply stopped smoking.

Colorectal cancer is linked to what we eat. In particular, eating too much meat has proven to increase our risk for developing colorectal cancer (Stephen, 2007; Stephen, 1999).

Meat, eggs, and dairy –  animal based protein –  has the potential to become a carcinogen in our body (see Food Science below).

An alternative, plant based Therapeutic Food protocol, replaces animal based protein with plant protein, nurtures the body with fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and more.

The Therapeutic Food Protocol for support against colorectal cancer:

The idea with these two products is to use them as a meal replacement multiple time a week.  As a breakfast drink you can add the above to a tall glass, add some fresh or frozen berries, some flax seed,  and add liquid- a 50/50 blend of water and organic pineapple juice.  And, it is replacing a meal where you normally had some meat and animal derived protein like bacon, sausage, ham, eggs.  The goal is to reduce these things.

And the Therapeutic Foods do so much more.

The Be Regular (on the shopping cart you’ll see the Energy Sustain) is organic chia, amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa and millet.  There is no gluten and it tastes great.  It has a good amount of plant based complete protein, vitamin, minerals, and essential oils.

The Beta Glucan Synbiotic provides pedigreed lactic acid bacteria.  They are fermenting bacteria, not putrefying bacteria and they put an inhibitory pressure on the growth of the putrefying strains.  The probiotics reduce and bind heterocyclic amines and nitrosamines – well established in research as extremely carcinogenic molecules. One hot dog has as many nitrosamines as five cigarettes.  They are found in unprocessed meat as well:  beef, chicken, and pork.   See Food Science below.

Food Science:

Reduction in the consumption of meat results in the reduction of the risk of colon cancer.

Stephen and fellow researchers (1999) looked a why African Americans get more colorectal cancer that Native Africans.  Colon cancer is extremely rare in Africans, while it’s 50 times higher in African Americans.  And, what’s interesting, it wasn’t because the Africans ate more fiber because their modern African diet is highly processed, low in fiber and yet there has been no dramatic increase in colon cancer.  The one big difference in their diets was that the diet of African Americans is rich in meat where as the native Africans diet is so low in meat and saturated fat.  Africans diet is more plant based with very little meat and saturated fat consumed weekly.  So much so that the Africans have a total cholesterol levels averaging 139, compared to over 200 in the US.

How does the extra meat eating cause cancer?

As observed by Cummings et al. (1979), the typical American diet has high level of animal protein intake, and because of that, up to 12 grams of protein per day can escape digestion and reach the colon where it is putrefyied by putrefying bacteria.  The byproduct of the putrefaction decomposition process is the production of, among other gases, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide gases which are cytotoxic.  Hydrogen sulfide impairs cytochrome oxidase, tissue metabolism, mucus formation, and DNA methylation

The difference between plant proteins and animal proteins reaching the colon is that the animal protein contain a lot of the sulfur containing amino acids like methionine, where plant protein doesn’t and hence very low hydrogen sulfide production.

This animal protein does more than just putrefy. It causes an increase in the cancer promoting growth hormone called IGF-1 (Levine, 2014).  Remove meat, egg whites, and dairy proteins from your diet, and our bloodstream can suppress cancer cell growth about eight time better because the blood levels of IFG-1 are greatly reduced (Ornish, 2005).

It is well established in medical science that heterocyclic amines (blackened meat derived carcinogens) and nitrosamines are potent carcinogens—one hotdog has as many nitrosamines and nitrosamides as five cigarettes.  The pedigreed bacterial species in the Beta Glucan Synbiotic have been shown to neutralize these carcinogenic molecules.

Bibliography:

  • Alberg AJ, Sarnet JM. (2003). Epidemiology of lung cancer. Chest Journal; 123(1_suppl): 21S-49S.
  • Cummings et al. (1979). The effect of meat protein and dietary fiber on colonic function and metabolism. Am J Clin Nutr; 32: 2094-2101.
  • Levine et al. (2014).  Low Protein Intake is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and overall mortality in the 65 and Younger gut not Older Population. Cell Metab; 19(3): 407-417.
  • Ornish et al. (2005). Intensive Lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. The Journal Of Urology; 175: 1055-1070.
  • Stephen et al. (1999). Rarity of Colon Cancer in Africans is associated with low animal product consumption, not fiber. AJG; 94: 1373-1380.
  • Stephen et al. (2007). Why do African Americans Get More Colon Cancer than Native Africans? American Society for Nutrition; 137(1): 175S-182S.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Where Trump and Clinton Stand on Food: A Special Report from John Robbins
We spend more on healthcare than any country in the world, yet we have the highest rate of cancer, diabetes and heart disease of any country in the world.  The above video gives us pause for thought.

Dear Friends

The University of Hawaii Cancer Center assessed that nearly every person in Hawaii will face a diagnosis of cancer either personally or within their family at some point in their life, so says (Hawaii Cancer Facts & Figures, 2010).

The Center’s Mission is to create a world where cancer no longer exists.

Cancer is basically a non-communicable life style disease, and diet is a huge component.  How then can Therapeutic Food supplements help in the prevention cancer?


Therapeutic Foods are plant based supplements. Here is a protocol based on recent studies to support the prevention of cancer

Food Science

Epidemiological studies have consistently linked abundant consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduction of the risk of developing several types of cancer (Boivin et al., 2009).

Boivin et al., (2009) evaluated the inhibitory effects of extracts isolated from 34 vegetables on the proliferation of 8 different tumor cell lines: breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and stomach cancer.

The best by far were vegetables from the Allium (particularly garlic) and the Cruciferous (particularly broccoli) families—inhibiting these cancers almost 100%. The researchers concluded, “The inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary based cancer-preventative strategies.”

Berry fruits have beneficial effects against several types of human cancers; and the evidence is overwhelming.  Their benefits are as follows:

  • Counteract, reduce and repair damage from oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • Regulating carcinogen and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, transcription and growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, and cellular signaling pathways of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis.
  • Sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance.
  • Provide protection from therapy-associated toxicities.

These anticancer potential benefits are related to their polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, gallotannis, phenolic acids), stilbenoids, lignans and triterpennoids (Seeram NP., 2008).

It is well established that glucans enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer and anti-infection immunotherapy, both in clinical and experimental conditions (Vetvocia V., 2013).

Beta-glucans, naturally occurring polysaccharides, are present as constituents of cell wall of cereal grains, mushrooms, algae, or microbes including bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Since Pillemer et al. first prepared and investigated zymosan in the 1940s and others followed with the investigation in the 60s and 70s, researchers have well established the significant role of B-glucans on the immune system relative to cancer treament, infection, immunity, and restoration of damaged bone marrow (Yoon TJ., 2013).

The good news is that these plant based foods are shown in many studies to help in the prevention of cancer, and at the same time, help to prevent heart disease and diabetes.

Bibliography:

  • Basu A. Lyons TJ. (2012). Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in the metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives. J Agric Food Chem; 60: 5687-92.
  • Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
  • Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health;72 doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • Seeram NP. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5.
  • Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.
  • Vetvocla  V. (2013). Synthetic oligossacharides: clinical application in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Md Chem; 13(5): 720-4.
  • Yoon et al. 2013. The effects of B-glucans on cancer metastasis. Anticancer Agents Med Chem; 13(5): 699-708.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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VERGE Summits are invitation-only, half-day working sessions exploring pressing issues at the intersection of technology and sustainability for companies, governments, utilities and innovators.

Cancer Support

February 18, 2016

Dear Friends

The American Institute for Cancer Research has their Ten Recommendations for Cancer Prevention, and most of them center around the foods choices we make. Of course, there’s the daily exercise routine, and the goal of being as lean as possible without becoming underweight; but most all of the others have to do with what we put in our mouth.

Therapeutic Food Supplements provide intelligent support for cancer prevention.

A Therapeutic Food protocol to support our ability to prevent and aid in treating cancer:

  • Garlic, organic– 1 to 2 capsules daily (more is okay, but not enough so that your skin has a garlic odor)
  • Cruciferous Sprout Complex 3-4 capsules daily, preferably on an empty stomach
  • Phyto Power, wild crafted– 1-2 capsules daily
  • Beta Glucan High Potency Symbiotic– 2 tablespoons daily
  • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic– 2-4capsules daily

 

Food Science:

Epidemiological studies have consistently linked abundant consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduction of the risk of developing several types of cancer. Boivin et al., (2009) evaluated the inhibitory effects of extracts isolated from 34 vegetables on the proliferation of 8 different tumor cell lines: breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and stomach cancer.

The best by far were vegetables from the Allium (particularly garlic) and the Cruciferous (particularly broccoli) families—inhibiting these cancers almost 100%. The researchers concluded, “The inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary based chemo-preventative strategies.”

Garlic, Organic Freeze Dried– each capsule contains 4 to 5 cloves of raw high active’s (alliin and alliinase) garlic.

Garlic contains phytoalexins that have been shown to induce apoptosis and target transcription factors, cell cycle checkpoints, and cell invasion. Garlic improves phase 2 detoxification pathways. Garlic contains allyl sulfides compounds that show anti-proliferative effects on tumor cells as well as aiding in detoxification. Garlic also contains natural organosulfur compounds (OSCs) that have been shown to have chemo-preventive effects and to suppress the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro through the induction of apoptosis (Cao et al., 2014; Romagnolo et al., 2012; Nepravishta et al., 2012; Melino et al., 2011)

Cruciferous Sprout Complex contains broccoli sprouts, daikon radish sprouts, red radish sprouts, watercress sprouts, kale sprouts, mustard sprouts and cabbage sprouts; all together containing high levels of not only glucosinolates, but also high levels of myrosinase (from red radish)—the enzyme necessary for high production of sulforaphanes.

Cruciferous Sprouts are an exceedingly rich source of glucosinolates and isothiocyanates that through their breakdown products induce phase 2 detoxication enzymes, boost antioxidant status, and protect animals against chemically induced cancer formation. They are among the most promising chemopreventive dietary constituents. They appear most closely associated with reduce cancer risk in organis such as the colorectum, lung, prostate and breast. (Abdull Razis & Noor., 2013; Steinkeller et al., 2001).

We will cover Phyto Power, Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic and Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic in next week’s Forward Thinking.

Bibliography:

Abdull Razis AF, Noor NM. (2013). Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev;14(3):1565-70.
Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
Melino S., Sabelli R, Paci M. (2011). Allyl sulfur compounds and cellular detoxification system: effects and perspectives in cancer therapy. Amino Acids;41(1):103-12.
Nepravishta et al. (2012). Oxidative species and s-glutathionyl conjugates in the apoptosis induction by allyl thiosulfate. FEBS J; 279(1): 154-67.
Romagnolo DF, Davis CD, Milner JA. (2012). Phytoalexins in cancer prevention. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed); 17: 2035-58.
Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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February is Cancer Prevention Month and The American Institute for Cancer Research provides a great website for support in the fight against cancer.  Check our their site and these ten recommendations for cancer prevention.