Cancer Support

Dear Friends

GS Photo JPEGBroccoli sprouts provide an exceptionally rich source of sulforaphane – a potent inducer of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens.  In fact, three-day-old sprouts of broccoli contain 10-100 times higher levels of glucoraphanin (the glucosinolate of sulforaphane) than do the mature broccoli plants.  Broccoli sprouts are the richest natural source for sulforaphanes, and the BioImmersion organic broccoli sprouts selected for the Glucosinolate & Sulforaphane are at the 100 fold level.

Our Glucosinolate & Sulforaphane replaces the Cruciferous Sprout Complex as it supplies 6-8 times the potency of the most important phytochemical, sulforaphane.

Glucosinolate & Sulforaphane comes in two sizes: the 120 capsule size as shown to the right and is in stock now, and the 60 capsule size bottle that will be available in three weeks.  With a dose being 1-2 capsules a day, the larger bottle will give a 2-4 month supply.

Food Science

Broccoli sprouts are a rich source of glucosinolates and isothiocyanates, shown in research to induce phase 2 detoxication enzymes, boost antioxidant status, and protect animals against chemically induced cancer.  Glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinase (an enzyme found in plants and bowel microflora) to form isothiocyanates.  Glucosinolates are inert as phase 2 enzyme inducers and must be hydrolyzed (break-down) to generate the active isothiocyanates (Shapiro et al., 2001).

Sulforaphane (SFN) is a compound derived from cruciferous vegetables with numerous bioactivities (Su et al., 2018). In fact, Broccoli and especially broccoli sprouts, accumulate significant amounts of the phytonutrient glucoraphanin, which is metabolized in vivo to the biologically active sulforaphane (SFN).  The preponderance of evidence available from in vitro, animal and human studies supports the association of sulforaphane with phase II enzyme induction (James et al., 2012), moreover, SFN strongly displays both anticarcinogenic and anticancer activity by modulating ‘key signaling pathways and genes involved in the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of angiogenesis’ (Su et al., 2018; see also Peng et al., 2015; Zhang & Tang, 2007).

SFN also upregulates a series of cytoprotective genes by activating nuclear factor erythroid-2- (NF-E2-) related factor 2 (Nrf2), a critical transcription factor activated in response to oxidative stress; Nrf2 activation is also involved in the cancer-preventive effects of SFN (Peng et al., 2015).

Sulforaphane is found in research to have many different health benefits:  Alzheimer’s (Kim et al., 2013), Cardiovascular Disorders (Angeloni et al., 2009), Diabetes (Bahadoran et al., 2012), Asthma- upper airway congestion, (Riedl et al., 2009) and Detoxification in all cells, and in particular with Liver Phase II detoxification enhancement (Riedl et al., 2009).

Sulforaphane (SFN) has been demonstrated to be an effective chemopreventive agent for many years (Shapiro et al., 2001), with positive effects against different kinds of cancers, such as cervical (Chen et al., 2016; Abdull et al., 2013), breast (Peng et al., 2015; Li et al., 2010), bladder (Leone et al., 2017), renal cell carcinoma (Juengel et al., 2016), non-small-cell lung cancer (Wang et al., 2017), and colon and prostate cancers (Clarke et al., 2008; Abdull et al., 2013).

We will continue to examine the research on this important food in the next few weeks.

References

Abdull Razis, A. F., Konsue, N., & Ioannides, C. (2018). Isothiocyanates and Xenobiotic Detoxification. Molecular nutrition & food research62(18), 1700916.

Abdull, R., Ahmad, F., & Noor, N. M. (2013). Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Asian Pacific Journal of cancer prevention, 14(3), 1565-1570.

Angeloni, C., Leoncini, E., Malaguti, M., Angelini, S., Hrelia, P., & Hrelia, S. (2009). Modulation of phase II enzymes by sulforaphane: implications for its cardioprotective potential. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry57(12), 5615-5622.

Bahadoran, Z., Tohidi, M., Nazeri, P., Mehran, M., Azizi, F., & Mirmiran, P. (2012). Effect of broccoli sprouts on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized double-blind clinical trial. International journal of food sciences and nutrition63(7), 767-771.

Cheng, Y. M., Tsai, C. C., & Hsu, Y. C. (2016). Sulforaphane, a dietary isothiocyanate, induces G2/M arrest in cervical cancer cells through cyclinB1 downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 association. International journal of molecular sciences, 17(9), 1530.

Clarke, J. D., Dashwood, R. H., & Ho, E. (2008). Multi-targeted prevention of cancer by sulforaphane. Cancer letters, 269(2), 291-304.

Fahey, J. W., Zhang, Y., & Talalay, P. (1997). Broccoli sprouts: an exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 94(19), 10367-10372.  http://www.pnas.org/content/94/19/10367

James, D., Devaraj, S., Bellur, P., Lakkanna, S., Vicini, J., & Boddupalli, S. (2012). Novel concepts of broccoli sulforaphanes and disease: induction of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes by enhanced-glucoraphanin broccoli. Nutrition reviews70(11), 654-665.

Juengel, E., Maxeiner, S., Rutz, J., Justin, S., Roos, F., Khoder, W., … & Blaheta, R. A. (2016). Sulforaphane inhibits proliferation and invasive activity of everolimus-resistant kidney cancer cells in vitro. Oncotarget, 7(51), 85208.

Kim, H. V., Kim, H. Y., Ehrlich, H. Y., Choi, S. Y., Kim, D. J., & Kim, Y. (2013). Amelioration of Alzheimer’s disease by neuroprotective effect of sulforaphane in animal model. Amyloid20(1), 7-12.

Li, Y., Zhang, T., Korkaya, H., Liu, S., Lee, H. F., Newman, B., … & Sun, D. (2010). Sulforaphane, a dietary component of broccoli/broccoli sprouts, inhibits breast cancer stem cells. Clinical Cancer Research, 1078-0432.

Peng, X., Zhou, Y., Tian, H., Yang, G., Li, C., Geng, Y., … & Wu, W. (2015). Sulforaphane inhibits invasion by phosphorylating ERK1/2 to regulate E-cadherin and CD44v6 in human prostate cancer DU145 cells. Oncology reports34(3), 1565-1572.

Riedl, M. A., Saxon, A., & Diaz-Sanchez, D. (2009). Oral sulforaphane increases Phase II antioxidant enzymes in the human upper airway. Clinical immunology130(3), 244-251.

Shapiro, T. A., Fahey, J. W., Wade, K. L., Stephenson, K. K., & Talalay, P. (2001). Chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of broccoli sprouts: metabolism and excretion in humans.Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Biomarkers, 10(5), 501-508.  http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/10/5/501.long

Su, X., Jiang, X., Meng, L., Dong, X., Shen, Y., & Xin, Y. (2018). Anticancer Activity of Sulforaphane: The Epigenetic Mechanisms and the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity2018.

Wang, D. X., Zou, Y. J., Zhuang, X. B., Chen, S. X., Lin, Y., Li, W. L., … & Lin, Z. Q. (2017). Sulforaphane suppresses EMT and metastasis in human lung cancer through miR-616-5p-mediated GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathways. Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, 38(2), 241.

Zhang, Y., & Tang, L. (2007). Discovery and development of sulforaphane as a cancer chemopreventive phytochemical. Acta pharmacologica Sinica, 28(9), 1343-1354.


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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The Environmental Working Group is a most important organization to get to know.  Their mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, they drive consumer choice and civic action.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

We are excited to announce our new and incredibly potent: organic broccoli cruciferous sprout. Our Glucosinolates & Sulforaphanes is a powerhouse, providing a four fold increase in the phase 2 enzymes inducing and cancer preventing molecules for which it is named.

G and S

Notice that the label above guarantees a Glucosinolate level of 15,000 ppm, a Glucoraphanin level of 10,000 ppm and a Sulforaphane potential of 4,000 ppm.  However, as you can see in the Certificate of Analysis below, the actual levels of these three most important ingredients are much higher, with the Glucosinolates at 21,359 ppm, the Glucoraphanins at 19,407 ppm, and the Sulforaphane yield at 8,733 ppm.  Our old beloved Cruciferous Sprouts product offered a 1500 ppm sulforaphane potential yield.

Organic Broc Sprout CofA

Recommended dose:  one to two capsules daily. Excellent before bed for liver detox.

Sulforaphane (SF) is a phytochemical that displays both anticarcinogenic and anticancer activity. SF modulates many cancer‐related events, including susceptibility to carcinogens, cell death, cell cycle, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis.   Zhang and Tang (2007) review its discovery and development as a cancer chemopreventive agent.

The preponderance of evidence available from in vitro, animal, and human studies supports the association of sulforaphane with phase II enzyme inductions.  Broccoli sprouts are the richest source of glucoraphanin which is the direct precursor to sulforaphane.  Since broccoli sulforaphane is one of the most potent inducers of phase II enzymes, exploration into broccoli’s impact on other areas of human health, such as cardiovasucular health and upper airway immunity, has been suggested (James et al., 2012).

In Qidong, China, a region where exposures to food-and air-borne carcinogens has been considerable, clinical trials indicate that interventions with well characterized preparations of broccoli sprouts may enhance the detoxication of aflatoxins and air-borne toxins, which may in turn attenuate their associated health risks including cancer in exposed individuals (Kensler et al., 2012).

We will continue to discuss this powerhouse product in our next email.

References:

  • James, D., Devaraj, S., Bellur, P., Lakkanna, S., Vicini, J., & Boddupalli, S. (2012). Novel concepts of broccoli sulforaphanes and disease: induction of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes by enhanced-glucoraphanin broccoli. Nutrition reviews, 70(11), 654-665.
  • Kensler, T. W., Egner, P. A., Agyeman, A. S., Visvanathan, K., Groopman, J. D., Chen, J. G., … & Talalay, P. (2012). Keap1–nrf2 signaling: a target for cancer prevention by sulforaphane. In Natural Products in Cancer Prevention and Therapy(pp. 163-177). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.
  • Zhang, Y., & Tang, L. (2007). Discovery and development of sulforaphane as a cancer chemopreventive phytochemical. Acta pharmacologica Sinica, 28(9), 1343-1354.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The Environmental Working Group is a most important organization to get to know.  Their mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, they drive consumer choice and civic action.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Our Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic embodies a high potency and powerful ability for all sorts of bladder and UTI issues. But the combination of supernatant with ORNs, probiotics, cranberries, and pomegranates do so much more!

NEW CP Jpeg Short 4

The phytonutrients are more concentrated, standardize to 6% quinic acid for the cranberry and 40% punicalagins for the pomegranate extract.

There are now five different organisms of probiotics in the formula. We grow them as whole organisms with their supernatant and ORNs.  We selected organisms that have a natural antimicrobial abilities against hospital generated infections.

The supernatant component of the product is much more comprehensive, dramatically enhancing its benefits.  It has our typical famous metabolites of the Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus plus the metabolites of our added three more organisms, five all together! Supernatant contains the food fermentation by-products (metabolites) that include lactic acids, amino acids, folates, bacterocins, biosurfactants and various beneficial enzymes such as bile salts hydrolase and lactase.  And of course, the supernatant also has the ORNs (oligoribnucleotides- their shorter chains of microRNAs), which prime the immune system and activate the rapid growth of these powerful probiotic organisms.

The prebiotic per capsule is 100mg of organic chicory root inulin (the total amount of ingredients per capsule is 500mg). Since our probiotics wake up much more rapidly due to complete sets of ORNs, they need food to grow.

In research, these ingredients show a reduction, not only, to the risk of UTI associated conditions but for both colon and breast cancers as well.

  • Vaginal eubiosis- Vaginal eubiosis is characterised by beneficial lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. In contrast, vaginal dysbiosis (e.g. bacterial vaginosis, BV), characterized by an overgrowth of multiple anaerobes, is associated with an increased risk of adverse urogenital and reproductive health outcomes.  The Lactobaccilus sp. in our Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic are strong lactic acid producers.
  • Biosurfactants- The role of Lactobacillusspecies in the female urogenital tract as a barrier to infection is of considerable interest.  These organisms are believed to contribute to the control of vaginal microbiota by competing with other micro-organisms for adherence to epithelial cells and by producing biosurfactants (Rodrigues, L. et al., 2006).  The good probiotics in this formula have demonstrated the ability to produce mucins as biosurfactants against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens.
  • Cancer Protection Support- Ou, J et al. (2012) in their paper, Association between low colonic short-chain fatty acids and high bile acid in high colon cancer risk populations, proposed that the influence of diet on colon cancer risk is mediated by the microbiota.  Their results suggested that the higher risk of colon cancer in Americans may be partly explained by their high-fat and high-protein, low complex carbohydrate diet, which produces colonic residues that promote microbes such as Clostridia and E. coli to produce potentially carcinogenic secondary bile acids and less antineoplastic SCFAs.  Our collection of good bacteria in this formula are SCFA producers and secondary bile acids reducers as you can see with one of their metabolites being the enzyme bile salts hydrolase.  These good bugs also put out bacterocins agains Clostridiaand E. coli.
  • Breast Cancer- Costarelli, V., and Sanders, T.A.B. (2002) found that the mean plasma secondary bile salt derivative DCA concentration were 52% higher in patients  with breast cancer compared with controls.  Reducing gut levels of DCA will reduce plasma levels.  Thereby, reducing this risk factor.
  • Colon Cancer- AJouz, H., Mukherjui, D., and Shamseddine, A. in their 2014 research paper stated that bile acids going into the intestines stimulate growth in the colon of Clostridia which convert primary to secondary bile acids, and secondary bile acids that were shown to be carcinogenic.   Hence the important of our good bugs that produce bacterocins to reduce Clostridial populations.
  • Animal Fat-Rich Diets- There is increasing evidence (Barrasa, J.I. et al. 2013) that the continous exposure to certain hydrophobic bile acids, due to a fat-rich diet may induce oxidative DNA damage that, in turn, may lead to colorectal carcinogenesis.

References

  • Tachedjian, G., Aldunate, M., Bradshaw, C. S., & Cone, R. A. (2017). The role of lactic acid production by probiotic Lactobacillus species in vaginal health. Research in microbiology, 168(9-10), 782-792. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0923250817300839?via%3Dihub
  • Rodrigues, L., Banat, I. M., Teixeira, J., & Oliveira, R. (2006). Biosurfactants: potential applications in medicine. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 57(4), 609-618. https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/57/4/609/669417
  • Ou, J., DeLany, J. P., Zhang, M., Sharma, S., & O’Keefe, S. J. (2012). Association between low colonic short-chain fatty acids and high bile acids in high colon cancer risk populations. Nutrition and cancer, 64(1), 34-40.
  • Costarelli, V., & Sanders, T. A. B. (2002). Plasma deoxycholic acid concentration is elevated in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. European journal of clinical nutrition, 56(9), 925.  https://www.nature.com/articles/1601396
  • Ajouz, H., Mukherji, D., & Shamseddine, A. (2014). Secondary bile acids: an underrecognized cause of colon cancer. World journal of surgical oncology, 12(1), 164.
  • Barrasa, J. I., Olmo, N., Lizarbe, M. A., & Turnay, J. (2013). Bile acids in the colon, from healthy to cytotoxic molecules. Toxicology in Vitro, 27(2), 964-977.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI).  Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-drived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures

González de Llano, D., Esteban-Fernández, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Martínlvarez, P. J., Moreno-Arribas, M., & Bartolomé, B. (2015). Anti-adhesive activity of cranberry phenolic compounds and their microbial-derived metabolites against uropathogenic Escherichia coli in bladder epithelial cell cultures. International journal of molecular sciences, 16(6), 12119-12130.

In the study sited below data indicated that both pomegranate aril and peel extracts have an effective antimicrobial activity, as evidenced by the inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth of two important human pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

Pagliarulo, C., De Vito, V., Picariello, G., Colicchio, R., Pastore, G., Salvatore, P., & Volpe, M. G. (2016). Inhibitory effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) polyphenol extracts on the bacterial growth and survival of clinical isolates of pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Food chemistry, 190, 824-831. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.06.028

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

What is the connection between the microbiome and heart heatlh? The microbiome’s metabolites are emerging as the deciding influence for good or bad health. We will dive into this topic in the next couple of weeks (check green facts below).

BG photoAs Dr. JoAnn Manson, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital says in Healthy gut, Healthy Heart(2018):

There’s a complex interplay between the microbes in our intestines and most of the systems in our bodies, including the vascular, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  All of these relationships are highly relevant to cardiovascular health.

What we eat plays a major role in the composition of our gut microbiota.  And we’re learning more about how the substances gut microbes churn out (called metabolites) influence our risk for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

The Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic: Cardio-Metabolic Support is a great product for seeding the gut with good pedigreed bacteria and prebiotic fibers that strongly support the integrity of the GI tract membrane, support the reduction of GI tract inflammation, support the strengthening and balancing of the immune system.

Probiotics are found in research to positively effect heart health (Kassaian et al., 2017; Sáez-Lara et al., 2016; DiRienzo, 2014; Delzenne et al., 2011; Saini et al., 2010), with many researchers positing the connection between heart and gut health (Serino et al., 2014; Huang et al., 2013).*

Oats and oat beta glucan have enjoyed a rich cultural historicity and extensive research on heart health (Andersson & Hellstrand, 2012).  Oats and oat beta glucan are found to reduce serum LDL cholesterol (Ho et al., 2016; Zhu et al., 2015; Whitehead et al., 2014; Wolever et al., 2010), improve liver function (Chang et al., 2013), and promote bowel regularity (Clemens, 2012; Mobley et al., 2014).*

Red beetroot offer a rich source of phyto-nutrients, including ascorbic acid (vitamin C), carotenoids, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Beets provide a source of dietary nitrate, shown in research to have important implication for heart health (Kapil et al., 2014). Beet’s nutrients are shown to prevent oxidation of LDLs, lower triglycerides, and balances blood pressure (Clifford et al., 2015; Eggenbeen et al., 2016; Hobbs et al., 2013).*

Inulin from organic chicory root supplies food for the probiotic organisms. Probiotic organisms need fiber to grow and multiply. See Slavin (2013) on fiber as prebiotics, and Dehghan et al. (2013) on inulin and cardiovascular support.*  Together with probiotic, inulin is also found in research to help tighten cell junctions, which is thought to aid against leaky gut syndrome (Cani et al., 2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009).*

The Beta Glucan was formulated to nourish both heart and gut into health.*

Bibliography:

  • Kassaian, N., Aminorroaya, A., Feizi, A., Jafari, P., Amini, M. (2017). The effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on metabolic syndrome indices in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trial, 18(1), 148. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-017-1885-8
  • Sáez-Lara, M.J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F.J., Plaza-Diaz, J., Gil, A.(2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci, 17(6).DOI: 10.3390/ijms17060928
  • DiRienzo D.B. (2014). Effect of probiotics on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: implications for heart-healthy diets. Nutr Rev, 72(1), 18-29. DOI: 10.1111/nure.12084
  • Delzenne, N.M., Neyrinck, A.M., Cani, P.D.(2011). Modulation of the gut microbiota by nutrients with prebiotic properties: consequences for host health in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Microb Cell Fact, 10 Suppl 1, S10. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2859-10-S1-S10
  • Saini, R., Saini, S., & Sharma, S. (2010). Potential of probiotics in controlling cardiovascular diseases. J.Cardiovasc Dis Res,1(4), 213-214. DOI: 10.4103/0975-3583.74267
  • Serino, M., Blasco-Baque, V., Nicolas, S., & Burcelin, R. (2014). Far from the Eyes, Close to the Heart: Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Cardiovasuclar Consequences. Curr Cardiol Rep, 16(11), 540. DOI: 10.1007/s11886-014-0540-1
  • Huang, Y., Wang, X., Wang, J., Wu, F., Sui, Y., Yang, L., Wang, Z. (2013). Lactobacillus plantarum strains as potential probiotic cultures with cholesterol-lowering activity. J Dairy Sci, 96(5), 2746-53.DOI: 10.3168/jds.2012-6123
  • Anderson, K.E., & Hellstrand, P. (2012). Dietary oats and modulation of atherogenic pathways. Mol Nutr Food Res, 56(7), 1003-13. DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201100706
  • Ho, H.V., Sievenpiper, J.L., Zurbau, A., Blanco Mejia, S., Jovanovski, E., Au-Yeung, F… Vuksan, V. (2016). The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials. Br J Nutr. 116(8):1369-1382. DOI: 10.1017/S000711451600341X
  • Zhu, X., Sun, X., Wang, M., Zhang, C., Cao, Y., Mo, G., Liang, J., Zhu, S. (2015).Quantitative assessment of the effects of beta-glucan consumption on serum lipid profile and glucose level in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis, 25(8), 714-23.DOI: 10.1016/j.numecd.2015.04.008
  • Whitehead A, Beck EJ, Tosh S, Wolever TM. (2014). Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr, 100(6), 1413-21.DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086108


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

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Healthy Gut, Healthy Heart:  How the trillions of bacteria in your intestinal tract play a role in your cardiovascular health.

Metabolomics—the study of metabolites—is an emerging scientific discipline of great importance for bettering our understanding of the connection of our GI tract microbiome and the health of our body. More on this topic next week.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Blueberry and Cancer

June 25, 2018

Dear Friends

Blueberries have shown protective effects against liver and breast cancers.

Liver cancer was the fourth most common cause of mortality worldwide.  In China, greater than 90% of patients with primary liver cancer have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which was the second-leading cause of cancer-associated mortality, influencing individuals of all ages.

The global overall survival of HCC patients remained particularly poor.  The majority of the poor prognoses were associated with recurrence and metastasis following treatment, including curative resection.

Zhan, W., et al. (2016) study investigate the effects of blueberry consumption on the migration, invasion, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in order to provide clinical treatment and prevention strategies for liver cancer therapeutic agents.

In the present study, the blueberry components were not detected and the important components were not extracted from the fresh blueberries. However, fresh blueberry juice was fed to the rats and the serum was collected. The serum from the blueberry-fed rats was used for co-culturing with HEPG2 cells, and the proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in HEPG2 cells was detected following culture with serums taken from rats fed with different concentrations of blueberry juice. The results indicated that the blueberry juice exerted significant antitumor and therapeutic effects on HEPG2 cells. The different concentrations of blueberry juice and varying treatment times resulted in distinct influences on the invasion, migration, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in the HEPG2 cells. The higher the concentration of blueberry the better were the results.

Note:  HEPG2 is an immortalized cell line consisting of human liver carcinoma cells derived from the tissue of a 15 year old caucasion male who had a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

Blueberry Extract is the most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

The Blueberry Extract is expensive: It takes 80 pounds of blueberries to get one pound of the pure purple extract. One capsule of this extract is equivalent to a cup and a quarter of whole blueberries.

  • Blueberry Extract- 1 capsule daily

To promote blueberry cancer support:  15% off on Blueberry Extract in June.

Like hepatocellular carcinoma, triple negative breast cancer has a high mortality rate.  See the research article below in Green Facts on blueberry’s positive results against this cancer.

References:

  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X., Liu, J., … & Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Biomedical reports, 5(5), 579-584.
    https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Adams, L. S., Phung, S., Yee, N., Seeram, N. P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010). Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer research, 70(9), 3594-3605.

This study investigated the chemopreventive activity of blueberry extract in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines in vitroand in vivo.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved