Cancer Support

Dear Friends

Did you know that polyphenols from berries and plants are the most favored foods for the probiotics genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the gut?

The berries and plants enhance the growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium inside the gut microbiome, while inhibiting many pathogenic organsims.

For example, Possemiers et al.’s (2011)  “The intestinal microbioime: a separate organ inside the body with the metabolic potential to influence the bioactivity of botanicals,” explains that rich polyphenolic molecules from berries and plants are broken down by probiotic organisms into many important sub-molecules that are more bioavailable yet still contain their classic polyphenolic structure to serve the body as antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, anti cancer, anti diabetes and more  … no wonder berries and plants are the preferred prebiotics foods for the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria!

 

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily
Phyto Power Photo 6

  • Three species of Rosehip, wildcrafted, whole fruit and seeds (100% w/w), refractory dried, three Rosa species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Dandelion, wildcrafted, aerial parts (90% w/w), root (10% w/w) with flower, refractory dried, four Taraxacum species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Blueberry, wildcrafted, fruit (>90% w/w), leaves and stem (<5% w/w), refractory dried, four Vaccinium species, 100mg per capsule.

 

 

Original Synbiotic: 1 tsp. dailyOriginal Photo 4

Contains:  20 billion cfu/tsp of certified strains of pedigreed probiotics (L. acidophilus,  B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and S. thermophilus) and 3.5 grams of inulin derived from organic chicory fiber.  Advanced freeze-drying technology.

120 grams/bottle. 4 grams/ tsp.  Dairy free.  Soy free. Gluten free. No excipients.

References

 

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Phenols and Oncogenes

February 19, 2018

Dear Friends

Phyto Power:  Supports DNA and cellular integrity during oncogenic treatment due to
its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.Phyto Power Photo 3

Food Science
  • DNA & Cellular Integrity: Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are shown in research to help maintain cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significant re-generative health benefits to the brain and nervous system (Jedrejek et al., 2017; Jiménez et al., 2016; Skrovankova et al., 2015; Joseph et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2013; Andersson et al., 2012; Chatterjee et al., 2011; Adams et al., 2010).*
  • Anti-Inflammation: García-Lafuente et al. (2009) conclude that flavonoids from berries and plants behave as anti-inflammatory agents in our body. Blueberries are rich with anthocyanins and a wide variety of phytochemicals that have been shown to effect neuro-regeneration in the brain (Albarracin et al., 2012).*
  • Energy & Weight-Loss: Dandelion is shown to have a great antioxidant activity (Hu et al., 2003), exhibiting diverse biological activities that promote energy, weight loss, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Jedrejek et al., 2017; González-Castejón et al., 2012; Jeon et al., 2008). The Rose hip has a rich phytochemical profile known for its antioxidant protection (Widen et al., 2012), supporting weight loss with a potential mechanism that decreases abdominal visceral fat (Nagatomo et al., 2015).*

Added Suggestion: Combine with the Original Synbiotic to bolster immune support. Add also the greenest food, Organic Chlorella, to support detox mechanism and immunity.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Albarracin, S.L., Stab, B., Casas, Z., Sutachan, J.J., Samudio, I., Gonzalez, J….Barreto, G.E. (2012). Effects of natural antioxidants in neurodegenerative disease. Nutr Neurosci, 15, 1-9. DOI: 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000028
  • Andersson, U., Berger, K., Hogberg, A., Landin-Olsson, M., & Holm, C. (2012). Effects of rose hip intake on risk markers of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over investigation in obese persons. Eur J Clin Nutr, 66, 585-590. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.203
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537-552. DOI: 10.1007/s00011-009-0037-3
  • Hu, C., & Kitts, D.D. (2003). Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, (1), 301-310.DOI: 10.1021/jf0258858
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82-88. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2007.09.006
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159136
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Liu, W., Lu, X., He, G., Gao, X., Xu, M., Zhang, J… Luo, C. (2013). Protective roles of Gadd45 and MDM2 in blueberry anthocyanins mediated DNA repair of fragmented and non-fragmented DNA damage in UV-irradiated HepG2 cells. Int Mol Sci, 14(11), 21447-62. DOI: 10.3390/ijms141121447
  • Nagatomo, A., Nishida, N., Fukuhara, I., Noro, A., Kozai, Y., Sato, H., & Matsuura, Y. (2015). Daily intake of rosehip extract decreases abdominal visceral fat in preobese subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes, 8, 147-156.DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S78623
  • Skrovankova, S., Sumczynski, D., Mlcek, J., Jurikova, T., Sochor, J.(2015). Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.Int J Mol Sci, 16(10), 24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673
  • Widen, C., Ekholm, A., Coleman, M.D., Renvert, S., Rumpunen, K. (2012). Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.) Oxid Med Cell Longev, 621579. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/621579 .

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Anti-carcinogenic Support

February 16, 2018

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                 Phyto Power High Rez 2

Phyto Power is formulated with several species of blueberry, rosehip, and dandelion, shown in research to support DNA and cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significantly to nerve re-generation.

Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are showing great potential in research on many different cancers, such as gastrointestinal tract (Bishayee et al., 2016), breast (Jeyabalan et al., 2014; Adams et al., 2010; Ries-Filho, 2008), brain (Cagle et al., 2012), breast and prostate (Sigsted et al., 2008), skin cancers (Chatterjee et al., 1011; Aggarwal et al., 2004), colon (Jiménez et al., 2016), and more.

Plant phenols have been researched for many years.  Johnson et al. (1994) found plants and their biologically active constituents contribute protective and anti-carcinogenic effects (see Table 1, p. 193).

More recently, Zhan et al. (2016) found that blueberries effect the migration, invasion, proliferation and cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Li et al. (2009), Seeram, (2008), and Serram et al. (2006) have researched different berries for many years to discover their effect on a variety of cancer cells. Yang & Li (2015) have shown that dandelion extract protects human skin fibroblast from UVB damage, while Sigstedt et al. (2008) studies dandelion leaves, flower and roots and their anti-carcinogenic effect on breast and prostate cancers. Rosehip is found to have antiproliferative and anti-oxidant effect (Jiménez et al., 2016), as well as reduce brain tumor proliferation and apoptosis (Cagle, 2012).

Phyto Power utilizes several varieties and the whole plants of blueberries, rosehips, and dandelions. Grown in remote regions of Alaska, these plants and berries are more powerful with high actives due to the pure, harsh and challenging environment of Alaska (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013; Dinstel et al., 2013).

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder! Take 1-2 capsules a day.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Aggarwal, B. B., Bhardwaj, A., Aggarwal, R. S., Seeram, N. P., Shishodia, S., & Takada, Y. (2004). Role of resveratrol in prevention and therapy of cancer: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer research, 24(5A), 2783-2840.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2014.982243
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 3(5), 13. . DOI:10.4236/jct.2012.35069
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi:10.1021/jf403810y . Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients?Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204. DOI: 10.1079/NRR19940011
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Li, L., Adams, L.S., Chen, S., Killan, C., Ahmed, A., & Seeram, N.P. (2009). Eugenia jambolana Lam. [purple berries] berry extract inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer but not non-tumorigenic breast cells. J Agric Food Chem, 57(3), 826-31. DOI: 10.1021/jf803407q
  • Seeram N.P. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5. DOI: 10.1021/jf072504n
  • Seeram, N.P., Adam, L.S., Zhang, Y., Lee, R., Sand, D., Scheuller, H.S., & Heber, D. (2006). Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. J Agric Food Chem, 54 (25), 9329-39.DOI: 10.1021/jf061750g
  • Sigstedt, S.C., Hooten, C.J., Callewaert, M.C., Jenkins, A.R., Romero, A.E., Pullin, M.J…. Steelant, W.F. (2008). Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 32(5), 1085-90. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.32.5.1085
  • Yang, Y., & Li, S. (2015). Dandelion extracts protect human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage and cellular senescence. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 619560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/619560
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. DOI: 10.1021/jf400823s
  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X, Liu, J., … Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.Biomed Rep, 5(5), 579-584. DOI: 10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Alaskan berries are known for their phenolic power:

Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188

In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and heart disease – conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska’s wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases.

Objective: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry.

Design: This research centred on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries – blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries – into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants.

Results: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.

Conclusion: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.

 

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Endotoxemia and Chlorella

December 14, 2017

Dear Friends

Chlorella HZ 2

Chlorella and inulin reduce endotoxemia and protect the intestinal mucosa barrier.

What is an endotoxin, and what causes endotoxemia? How does chlorella reduce endotoxemia, and how does inulin produce a healthy microbiome?  Let’s take a look at a few studies.

An endotoxin is often used synonymously with LPS.  Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Rietschel et al. found in 1994 that LPSs induce strong inflammatory responses from the immune systems of all animals.

Liver Diseases are associated with leaky gut syndrome, which allows for the passage LPS molecules into the systemic circulation, causing chronic inflammation, and a condition called endotoxemia. A large enough load of LPSs in the systemic circulations can cause septic shock.

In fact, severe sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition, with as many deaths annually as those from acute myocardial infarction. It is especially common in the elderly and is likely to increase substantially as the U.S. population ages (Angus et al., 2001)

Bedirli et al. (2009) investigated the role of different microalgae (Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp.) extracts in intestinal barrier function and oxidative stress in experimentally jaundice rats.

The main outcomes measured were endotoxin concentrations in plasma [e.g. LPS levels], evidence of bacterial translocation in mesenteric lymph nodes and liver oxidative stress, and histology.

Their findings: A Chlorella sp. supplemented diet significantly demonstrated protective effects on the intestinal mucosa barrier in obstructive jaundice, and reduced intestinal translocation of bacteria and endotoxin.  Spirulina had no significant effect.

Original copyCani et al. (2008) found that a high animal fat diet changes the GI tract microbiome into a population of increasing numbers of Gram-negative bacteria, which raises the level of LPS endotoxins within the gut lumen and allows their passing through the GI tract membrane into the plasma.

The research team concluded that the plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) controls the inflammatory tone of the body.  This means that high concentrations of LPS set the stage for endotoxemia, resulting in metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes, CVD) and cancer.

They further demonstrated in the study that increased fibers in the diet, such as inulin, increase the populations of Bifidobacterial sp. and Lactobacillus sp. which reduce both the load of Gram-negative bacteria and the permeability of the gastrointestinal membrane.

Our Suggestion: Take 4 to 8 tablets of Organic Chlorella daily.
Take 1 tsp. of Original Synbiotic daily.
References:

  • Angus, D. C., Linde-Zwirble, W. T., Lidicker, J., Clermont, G., Carcillo, J., & Pinsky, M. R. (2001). Epidemiology of severe sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care. Critical care medicine, 29(7), 1303-1310.
  • Bedirli, A., Kerem, M., Ofluoglu, E., Salman, B., Katircioglu, H., Bedirli, N., … & Pasaoglu, H. (2009). Administration of Chlorella sp. microalgae reduces endotoxemia, intestinal oxidative stress and bacterial translocation in experimental biliary obstruction. Clinical nutrition, 28(6), 674-678.
  • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-8.
  • Rietschel, E. T., Kirikae, T., Schade, F. U., Mamat, U., Schmidt, G., Loppnow, H., … & Di Padova, F. (1994). Bacterial endotoxin: molecular relationships of structure to activity and function. The FASEB Journal, 8(2), 217-225.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3
What kind of world do you want to wake up to 30 years from now?
The Biomimicry Institute aspires to a world where what we make is inspired by, and connected to, the natural world.  This means cities are resilient, emission targets are achieved, and industrial processes create healthy air, water, and soil.  It also means all species are thriving because our human designs restore the planet as nature’s desgns do.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Original copy
The Original Synbiotic is a daily probiotic for the whole family.

The Original probiotics are researched pedigreed strains of lactic acid bacteria that support the development of a healthy GI tract microbiome.

A healthy gut microbiome is dependent on strong and proven probiotics, such as the Original strains. The Original Synbiotic provides a powerful symbiotic combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Streptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 19258), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and Bifidobacterium longum (ATCC 15707).

Our chosen probiotics are foundational ATCC strains shown in research to work together with human cells to perform many functions in the body. For example, these probiotic strains help the digestive system, support and balance the immune system, and enhance our nervous system by producing neurotransmitters. They reinforce the GI barrier function to protect us from xenobiotics and pathogens, even binding heavy metals. Moreover, they neutralize carcinogens such as those caused by heterocyclic amines found in blackened meat and elements such as nitrosamines in sausage. By acidifying the epithelial membrane, they enable the absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium more readily. And lastly, our chosen strains also support the important task of daily regularity (Syngia et al., 2016; Hardy et al., 2013; Figueroa‐González et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2009).

The Original Synbiotic suggested daily dose: one tsp daily.

Of the many beneficial functions needed to be performed by our probiotic friends, colonizing the GI tract membrane and thereby protecting from our body from pathogens and xenobiotics, is very important. Check out these studies on colonization (Toscano et al., 2017; Underwood et al., 2015; Panigrahi et al., 2008; De Champs et al., 2003; Sarem- Damerdji et al., 1995).

See the Original Synbiotic Monograph.

References:

  • De Champs, C., Maroncle, N., Balestrino, Damien., Rich, C., Forestier, C. (2003). Persistence of Colonization of Intestinal Mucosa by A Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus casei subsp rhamnosus Lcr35, after Oran Consumption. J Com Microbiol; 41(3): 1270-1273.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC150315/
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Panigrahi, P., Pradhan, L., Mohapatra, S.S., Misra, P.R., Johnson, J.A., Chaudhry, R., Taylor, S., Hanse, N.I., Gewolb, I.H. (2008). Long-term colonization of a Lactobacillus plantarum synbiotic preparation in the neonatal gut. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 47(1):45-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607268
  • Sarem-Damerdji, L., Sarem, F., Marchal, L., Micolas, J.P. (1995). In vitro colonization ability of human colon mucosa by exogenous Lactobacillus strains. FEMS Microbiology Letters; 131(2):133-137. https://academic.oup.com/femsle/article-abstract/131/2/133/524865/In-vitro-colonization-ability-of-human-colon?redirectedFrom=PDF
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of food science and technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Toscano, M., De Grandi, R., Stronati, L., De Vecchi, E., & Drago, L. (2017). Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the healthy gut microbiota composition at phyla and species level: A preliminary study. World journal of gastroenterology, 23(15), 2696.
  • Underwood, M. A., German, J. B., Lebrilla, C. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut. Pediatric research, 77, 229.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350908/

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3In today’s world the level of assault on our bodies from pollution, pathogens, and stress is so high that we need powerful food supplements.  Our bodies, after all, know exactly what and how to utilize food for therapeutic purposes.

At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved