Cancer Support

Dear Friends

What is the connection between the microbiome and heart heatlh? The microbiome’s metabolites are emerging as the deciding influence for good or bad health. We will dive into this topic in the next couple of weeks (check green facts below).

BG photoAs Dr. JoAnn Manson, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital says in Healthy gut, Healthy Heart(2018):

There’s a complex interplay between the microbes in our intestines and most of the systems in our bodies, including the vascular, nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.  All of these relationships are highly relevant to cardiovascular health.

What we eat plays a major role in the composition of our gut microbiota.  And we’re learning more about how the substances gut microbes churn out (called metabolites) influence our risk for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

The Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic: Cardio-Metabolic Support is a great product for seeding the gut with good pedigreed bacteria and prebiotic fibers that strongly support the integrity of the GI tract membrane, support the reduction of GI tract inflammation, support the strengthening and balancing of the immune system.

Probiotics are found in research to positively effect heart health (Kassaian et al., 2017; Sáez-Lara et al., 2016; DiRienzo, 2014; Delzenne et al., 2011; Saini et al., 2010), with many researchers positing the connection between heart and gut health (Serino et al., 2014; Huang et al., 2013).*

Oats and oat beta glucan have enjoyed a rich cultural historicity and extensive research on heart health (Andersson & Hellstrand, 2012).  Oats and oat beta glucan are found to reduce serum LDL cholesterol (Ho et al., 2016; Zhu et al., 2015; Whitehead et al., 2014; Wolever et al., 2010), improve liver function (Chang et al., 2013), and promote bowel regularity (Clemens, 2012; Mobley et al., 2014).*

Red beetroot offer a rich source of phyto-nutrients, including ascorbic acid (vitamin C), carotenoids, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Beets provide a source of dietary nitrate, shown in research to have important implication for heart health (Kapil et al., 2014). Beet’s nutrients are shown to prevent oxidation of LDLs, lower triglycerides, and balances blood pressure (Clifford et al., 2015; Eggenbeen et al., 2016; Hobbs et al., 2013).*

Inulin from organic chicory root supplies food for the probiotic organisms. Probiotic organisms need fiber to grow and multiply. See Slavin (2013) on fiber as prebiotics, and Dehghan et al. (2013) on inulin and cardiovascular support.*  Together with probiotic, inulin is also found in research to help tighten cell junctions, which is thought to aid against leaky gut syndrome (Cani et al., 2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009).*

The Beta Glucan was formulated to nourish both heart and gut into health.*

Bibliography:

  • Kassaian, N., Aminorroaya, A., Feizi, A., Jafari, P., Amini, M. (2017). The effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on metabolic syndrome indices in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trial, 18(1), 148. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-017-1885-8
  • Sáez-Lara, M.J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F.J., Plaza-Diaz, J., Gil, A.(2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci, 17(6).DOI: 10.3390/ijms17060928
  • DiRienzo D.B. (2014). Effect of probiotics on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: implications for heart-healthy diets. Nutr Rev, 72(1), 18-29. DOI: 10.1111/nure.12084
  • Delzenne, N.M., Neyrinck, A.M., Cani, P.D.(2011). Modulation of the gut microbiota by nutrients with prebiotic properties: consequences for host health in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Microb Cell Fact, 10 Suppl 1, S10. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2859-10-S1-S10
  • Saini, R., Saini, S., & Sharma, S. (2010). Potential of probiotics in controlling cardiovascular diseases. J.Cardiovasc Dis Res,1(4), 213-214. DOI: 10.4103/0975-3583.74267
  • Serino, M., Blasco-Baque, V., Nicolas, S., & Burcelin, R. (2014). Far from the Eyes, Close to the Heart: Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Cardiovasuclar Consequences. Curr Cardiol Rep, 16(11), 540. DOI: 10.1007/s11886-014-0540-1
  • Huang, Y., Wang, X., Wang, J., Wu, F., Sui, Y., Yang, L., Wang, Z. (2013). Lactobacillus plantarum strains as potential probiotic cultures with cholesterol-lowering activity. J Dairy Sci, 96(5), 2746-53.DOI: 10.3168/jds.2012-6123
  • Anderson, K.E., & Hellstrand, P. (2012). Dietary oats and modulation of atherogenic pathways. Mol Nutr Food Res, 56(7), 1003-13. DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201100706
  • Ho, H.V., Sievenpiper, J.L., Zurbau, A., Blanco Mejia, S., Jovanovski, E., Au-Yeung, F… Vuksan, V. (2016). The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials. Br J Nutr. 116(8):1369-1382. DOI: 10.1017/S000711451600341X
  • Zhu, X., Sun, X., Wang, M., Zhang, C., Cao, Y., Mo, G., Liang, J., Zhu, S. (2015).Quantitative assessment of the effects of beta-glucan consumption on serum lipid profile and glucose level in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis, 25(8), 714-23.DOI: 10.1016/j.numecd.2015.04.008
  • Whitehead A, Beck EJ, Tosh S, Wolever TM. (2014). Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr, 100(6), 1413-21.DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086108


Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Healthy Gut, Healthy Heart:  How the trillions of bacteria in your intestinal tract play a role in your cardiovascular health.

Metabolomics—the study of metabolites—is an emerging scientific discipline of great importance for bettering our understanding of the connection of our GI tract microbiome and the health of our body. More on this topic next week.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Blueberry and Cancer

June 25, 2018

Dear Friends

Blueberries have shown protective effects against liver and breast cancers.

Liver cancer was the fourth most common cause of mortality worldwide.  In China, greater than 90% of patients with primary liver cancer have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which was the second-leading cause of cancer-associated mortality, influencing individuals of all ages.

The global overall survival of HCC patients remained particularly poor.  The majority of the poor prognoses were associated with recurrence and metastasis following treatment, including curative resection.

Zhan, W., et al. (2016) study investigate the effects of blueberry consumption on the migration, invasion, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in order to provide clinical treatment and prevention strategies for liver cancer therapeutic agents.

In the present study, the blueberry components were not detected and the important components were not extracted from the fresh blueberries. However, fresh blueberry juice was fed to the rats and the serum was collected. The serum from the blueberry-fed rats was used for co-culturing with HEPG2 cells, and the proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in HEPG2 cells was detected following culture with serums taken from rats fed with different concentrations of blueberry juice. The results indicated that the blueberry juice exerted significant antitumor and therapeutic effects on HEPG2 cells. The different concentrations of blueberry juice and varying treatment times resulted in distinct influences on the invasion, migration, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in the HEPG2 cells. The higher the concentration of blueberry the better were the results.

Note:  HEPG2 is an immortalized cell line consisting of human liver carcinoma cells derived from the tissue of a 15 year old caucasion male who had a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

Blueberry Extract is the most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

The Blueberry Extract is expensive: It takes 80 pounds of blueberries to get one pound of the pure purple extract. One capsule of this extract is equivalent to a cup and a quarter of whole blueberries.

  • Blueberry Extract- 1 capsule daily

To promote blueberry cancer support:  15% off on Blueberry Extract in June.

Like hepatocellular carcinoma, triple negative breast cancer has a high mortality rate.  See the research article below in Green Facts on blueberry’s positive results against this cancer.

References:

  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X., Liu, J., … & Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Biomedical reports, 5(5), 579-584.
    https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Adams, L. S., Phung, S., Yee, N., Seeram, N. P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010). Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer research, 70(9), 3594-3605.

This study investigated the chemopreventive activity of blueberry extract in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines in vitroand in vivo.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved
Dear Friends

Did you know that polyphenols from berries and plants are the most favored foods for the probiotics genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the gut?

The berries and plants enhance the growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium inside the gut microbiome, while inhibiting many pathogenic organsims.

For example, Possemiers et al.’s (2011)  “The intestinal microbioime: a separate organ inside the body with the metabolic potential to influence the bioactivity of botanicals,” explains that rich polyphenolic molecules from berries and plants are broken down by probiotic organisms into many important sub-molecules that are more bioavailable yet still contain their classic polyphenolic structure to serve the body as antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, anti cancer, anti diabetes and more  … no wonder berries and plants are the preferred prebiotics foods for the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria!

 

Phyto Power– 1 capsule daily
Phyto Power Photo 6

  • Three species of Rosehip, wildcrafted, whole fruit and seeds (100% w/w), refractory dried, three Rosa species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Dandelion, wildcrafted, aerial parts (90% w/w), root (10% w/w) with flower, refractory dried, four Taraxacum species, 200mg per capsule.
  • Four species of Blueberry, wildcrafted, fruit (>90% w/w), leaves and stem (<5% w/w), refractory dried, four Vaccinium species, 100mg per capsule.

 

 

Original Synbiotic: 1 tsp. dailyOriginal Photo 4

Contains:  20 billion cfu/tsp of certified strains of pedigreed probiotics (L. acidophilus,  B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and S. thermophilus) and 3.5 grams of inulin derived from organic chicory fiber.  Advanced freeze-drying technology.

120 grams/bottle. 4 grams/ tsp.  Dairy free.  Soy free. Gluten free. No excipients.

References

 

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Phenols and Oncogenes

February 19, 2018

Dear Friends

Phyto Power:  Supports DNA and cellular integrity during oncogenic treatment due to
its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.Phyto Power Photo 3

Food Science
  • DNA & Cellular Integrity: Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are shown in research to help maintain cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significant re-generative health benefits to the brain and nervous system (Jedrejek et al., 2017; Jiménez et al., 2016; Skrovankova et al., 2015; Joseph et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2013; Andersson et al., 2012; Chatterjee et al., 2011; Adams et al., 2010).*
  • Anti-Inflammation: García-Lafuente et al. (2009) conclude that flavonoids from berries and plants behave as anti-inflammatory agents in our body. Blueberries are rich with anthocyanins and a wide variety of phytochemicals that have been shown to effect neuro-regeneration in the brain (Albarracin et al., 2012).*
  • Energy & Weight-Loss: Dandelion is shown to have a great antioxidant activity (Hu et al., 2003), exhibiting diverse biological activities that promote energy, weight loss, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Jedrejek et al., 2017; González-Castejón et al., 2012; Jeon et al., 2008). The Rose hip has a rich phytochemical profile known for its antioxidant protection (Widen et al., 2012), supporting weight loss with a potential mechanism that decreases abdominal visceral fat (Nagatomo et al., 2015).*

Added Suggestion: Combine with the Original Synbiotic to bolster immune support. Add also the greenest food, Organic Chlorella, to support detox mechanism and immunity.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Albarracin, S.L., Stab, B., Casas, Z., Sutachan, J.J., Samudio, I., Gonzalez, J….Barreto, G.E. (2012). Effects of natural antioxidants in neurodegenerative disease. Nutr Neurosci, 15, 1-9. DOI: 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000028
  • Andersson, U., Berger, K., Hogberg, A., Landin-Olsson, M., & Holm, C. (2012). Effects of rose hip intake on risk markers of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over investigation in obese persons. Eur J Clin Nutr, 66, 585-590. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.203
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537-552. DOI: 10.1007/s00011-009-0037-3
  • Hu, C., & Kitts, D.D. (2003). Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, (1), 301-310.DOI: 10.1021/jf0258858
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82-88. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2007.09.006
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159136
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Liu, W., Lu, X., He, G., Gao, X., Xu, M., Zhang, J… Luo, C. (2013). Protective roles of Gadd45 and MDM2 in blueberry anthocyanins mediated DNA repair of fragmented and non-fragmented DNA damage in UV-irradiated HepG2 cells. Int Mol Sci, 14(11), 21447-62. DOI: 10.3390/ijms141121447
  • Nagatomo, A., Nishida, N., Fukuhara, I., Noro, A., Kozai, Y., Sato, H., & Matsuura, Y. (2015). Daily intake of rosehip extract decreases abdominal visceral fat in preobese subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes, 8, 147-156.DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S78623
  • Skrovankova, S., Sumczynski, D., Mlcek, J., Jurikova, T., Sochor, J.(2015). Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.Int J Mol Sci, 16(10), 24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673
  • Widen, C., Ekholm, A., Coleman, M.D., Renvert, S., Rumpunen, K. (2012). Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.) Oxid Med Cell Longev, 621579. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/621579 .

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Anti-carcinogenic Support

February 16, 2018

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                 Phyto Power High Rez 2

Phyto Power is formulated with several species of blueberry, rosehip, and dandelion, shown in research to support DNA and cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significantly to nerve re-generation.

Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are showing great potential in research on many different cancers, such as gastrointestinal tract (Bishayee et al., 2016), breast (Jeyabalan et al., 2014; Adams et al., 2010; Ries-Filho, 2008), brain (Cagle et al., 2012), breast and prostate (Sigsted et al., 2008), skin cancers (Chatterjee et al., 1011; Aggarwal et al., 2004), colon (Jiménez et al., 2016), and more.

Plant phenols have been researched for many years.  Johnson et al. (1994) found plants and their biologically active constituents contribute protective and anti-carcinogenic effects (see Table 1, p. 193).

More recently, Zhan et al. (2016) found that blueberries effect the migration, invasion, proliferation and cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Li et al. (2009), Seeram, (2008), and Serram et al. (2006) have researched different berries for many years to discover their effect on a variety of cancer cells. Yang & Li (2015) have shown that dandelion extract protects human skin fibroblast from UVB damage, while Sigstedt et al. (2008) studies dandelion leaves, flower and roots and their anti-carcinogenic effect on breast and prostate cancers. Rosehip is found to have antiproliferative and anti-oxidant effect (Jiménez et al., 2016), as well as reduce brain tumor proliferation and apoptosis (Cagle, 2012).

Phyto Power utilizes several varieties and the whole plants of blueberries, rosehips, and dandelions. Grown in remote regions of Alaska, these plants and berries are more powerful with high actives due to the pure, harsh and challenging environment of Alaska (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013; Dinstel et al., 2013).

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder! Take 1-2 capsules a day.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Aggarwal, B. B., Bhardwaj, A., Aggarwal, R. S., Seeram, N. P., Shishodia, S., & Takada, Y. (2004). Role of resveratrol in prevention and therapy of cancer: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer research, 24(5A), 2783-2840.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2014.982243
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 3(5), 13. . DOI:10.4236/jct.2012.35069
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi:10.1021/jf403810y . Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients?Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204. DOI: 10.1079/NRR19940011
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Li, L., Adams, L.S., Chen, S., Killan, C., Ahmed, A., & Seeram, N.P. (2009). Eugenia jambolana Lam. [purple berries] berry extract inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer but not non-tumorigenic breast cells. J Agric Food Chem, 57(3), 826-31. DOI: 10.1021/jf803407q
  • Seeram N.P. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5. DOI: 10.1021/jf072504n
  • Seeram, N.P., Adam, L.S., Zhang, Y., Lee, R., Sand, D., Scheuller, H.S., & Heber, D. (2006). Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. J Agric Food Chem, 54 (25), 9329-39.DOI: 10.1021/jf061750g
  • Sigstedt, S.C., Hooten, C.J., Callewaert, M.C., Jenkins, A.R., Romero, A.E., Pullin, M.J…. Steelant, W.F. (2008). Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 32(5), 1085-90. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.32.5.1085
  • Yang, Y., & Li, S. (2015). Dandelion extracts protect human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage and cellular senescence. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 619560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/619560
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. DOI: 10.1021/jf400823s
  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X, Liu, J., … Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.Biomed Rep, 5(5), 579-584. DOI: 10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Alaskan berries are known for their phenolic power:

Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188

In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and heart disease – conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska’s wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases.

Objective: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry.

Design: This research centred on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries – blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries – into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants.

Results: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.

Conclusion: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.

 

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved