Protocols for Health

Phenols and Oncogenes

February 19, 2018

Dear Friends

Phyto Power:  Supports DNA and cellular integrity during oncogenic treatment due to
its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties.Phyto Power Photo 3

Food Science
  • DNA & Cellular Integrity: Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are shown in research to help maintain cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significant re-generative health benefits to the brain and nervous system (Jedrejek et al., 2017; Jiménez et al., 2016; Skrovankova et al., 2015; Joseph et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2013; Andersson et al., 2012; Chatterjee et al., 2011; Adams et al., 2010).*
  • Anti-Inflammation: García-Lafuente et al. (2009) conclude that flavonoids from berries and plants behave as anti-inflammatory agents in our body. Blueberries are rich with anthocyanins and a wide variety of phytochemicals that have been shown to effect neuro-regeneration in the brain (Albarracin et al., 2012).*
  • Energy & Weight-Loss: Dandelion is shown to have a great antioxidant activity (Hu et al., 2003), exhibiting diverse biological activities that promote energy, weight loss, and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Jedrejek et al., 2017; González-Castejón et al., 2012; Jeon et al., 2008). The Rose hip has a rich phytochemical profile known for its antioxidant protection (Widen et al., 2012), supporting weight loss with a potential mechanism that decreases abdominal visceral fat (Nagatomo et al., 2015).*

Added Suggestion: Combine with the Original Synbiotic to bolster immune support. Add also the greenest food, Organic Chlorella, to support detox mechanism and immunity.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Albarracin, S.L., Stab, B., Casas, Z., Sutachan, J.J., Samudio, I., Gonzalez, J….Barreto, G.E. (2012). Effects of natural antioxidants in neurodegenerative disease. Nutr Neurosci, 15, 1-9. DOI: 10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000028
  • Andersson, U., Berger, K., Hogberg, A., Landin-Olsson, M., & Holm, C. (2012). Effects of rose hip intake on risk markers of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over investigation in obese persons. Eur J Clin Nutr, 66, 585-590. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.203
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • García-Lafuente, A., Guillamón, E., Villares, A., Rostagno, M.A., & Martínez, J.A. (2009). Flavonoids as antiinflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease. Inflamm Res, 58, 537-552. DOI: 10.1007/s00011-009-0037-3
  • Hu, C., & Kitts, D.D. (2003). Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, (1), 301-310.DOI: 10.1021/jf0258858
  • Jeon, H.J., Kang, H. J., JungH.J. Kant, Y.S., Lim, C.J., Kim, Y.M., & Park, E.H. (2008). Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 115 (1), 82-88. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2007.09.006
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Jiménez, S., Gascón, S., Luquin, A., Laguna, M., Ancin-Azpilicueta, C., Rodríguez-Yoldi, M.J. (2016). Rosa canina Extracts Have Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects on Caco-2 Human Colon Cancer. PLoS One, 11(7), e0159136. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159136
  • Joseph, S.V., Edirisinghe, I., & Burton-Freeman, B.M. (2014). Berries: anti-inflammatory effects in humans. J Agric Food Chem, 7; 62(18), 3886-903. DOI:10.1021/jf4044056
  • Liu, W., Lu, X., He, G., Gao, X., Xu, M., Zhang, J… Luo, C. (2013). Protective roles of Gadd45 and MDM2 in blueberry anthocyanins mediated DNA repair of fragmented and non-fragmented DNA damage in UV-irradiated HepG2 cells. Int Mol Sci, 14(11), 21447-62. DOI: 10.3390/ijms141121447
  • Nagatomo, A., Nishida, N., Fukuhara, I., Noro, A., Kozai, Y., Sato, H., & Matsuura, Y. (2015). Daily intake of rosehip extract decreases abdominal visceral fat in preobese subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes, 8, 147-156.DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S78623
  • Skrovankova, S., Sumczynski, D., Mlcek, J., Jurikova, T., Sochor, J.(2015). Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.Int J Mol Sci, 16(10), 24673-706. doi: 10.3390/ijms161024673
  • Widen, C., Ekholm, A., Coleman, M.D., Renvert, S., Rumpunen, K. (2012). Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.) Oxid Med Cell Longev, 621579. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/621579 .

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Phyto Power is indeed powerful. In fact, Dinstel et al. (2013) found the antioxidant levels of Alaska’s wild berries to be extremely high, ranging from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC values than cultivated berries from 48 other states. For example, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. When the berries were dehydrated, per gram the ORAC values increased.*
 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Anti-carcinogenic Support

February 16, 2018

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                 Phyto Power High Rez 2

Phyto Power is formulated with several species of blueberry, rosehip, and dandelion, shown in research to support DNA and cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significantly to nerve re-generation.

Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are showing great potential in research on many different cancers, such as gastrointestinal tract (Bishayee et al., 2016), breast (Jeyabalan et al., 2014; Adams et al., 2010; Ries-Filho, 2008), brain (Cagle et al., 2012), breast and prostate (Sigsted et al., 2008), skin cancers (Chatterjee et al., 1011; Aggarwal et al., 2004), colon (Jiménez et al., 2016), and more.

Plant phenols have been researched for many years.  Johnson et al. (1994) found plants and their biologically active constituents contribute protective and anti-carcinogenic effects (see Table 1, p. 193).

More recently, Zhan et al. (2016) found that blueberries effect the migration, invasion, proliferation and cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Li et al. (2009), Seeram, (2008), and Serram et al. (2006) have researched different berries for many years to discover their effect on a variety of cancer cells. Yang & Li (2015) have shown that dandelion extract protects human skin fibroblast from UVB damage, while Sigstedt et al. (2008) studies dandelion leaves, flower and roots and their anti-carcinogenic effect on breast and prostate cancers. Rosehip is found to have antiproliferative and anti-oxidant effect (Jiménez et al., 2016), as well as reduce brain tumor proliferation and apoptosis (Cagle, 2012).

Phyto Power utilizes several varieties and the whole plants of blueberries, rosehips, and dandelions. Grown in remote regions of Alaska, these plants and berries are more powerful with high actives due to the pure, harsh and challenging environment of Alaska (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013; Dinstel et al., 2013).

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder! Take 1-2 capsules a day.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Aggarwal, B. B., Bhardwaj, A., Aggarwal, R. S., Seeram, N. P., Shishodia, S., & Takada, Y. (2004). Role of resveratrol in prevention and therapy of cancer: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer research, 24(5A), 2783-2840.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2014.982243
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 3(5), 13. . DOI:10.4236/jct.2012.35069
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi:10.1021/jf403810y . Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients?Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204. DOI: 10.1079/NRR19940011
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Li, L., Adams, L.S., Chen, S., Killan, C., Ahmed, A., & Seeram, N.P. (2009). Eugenia jambolana Lam. [purple berries] berry extract inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer but not non-tumorigenic breast cells. J Agric Food Chem, 57(3), 826-31. DOI: 10.1021/jf803407q
  • Seeram N.P. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5. DOI: 10.1021/jf072504n
  • Seeram, N.P., Adam, L.S., Zhang, Y., Lee, R., Sand, D., Scheuller, H.S., & Heber, D. (2006). Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. J Agric Food Chem, 54 (25), 9329-39.DOI: 10.1021/jf061750g
  • Sigstedt, S.C., Hooten, C.J., Callewaert, M.C., Jenkins, A.R., Romero, A.E., Pullin, M.J…. Steelant, W.F. (2008). Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 32(5), 1085-90. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.32.5.1085
  • Yang, Y., & Li, S. (2015). Dandelion extracts protect human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage and cellular senescence. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 619560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/619560
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. DOI: 10.1021/jf400823s
  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X, Liu, J., … Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.Biomed Rep, 5(5), 579-584. DOI: 10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Alaskan berries are known for their phenolic power:

Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188

In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and heart disease – conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska’s wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases.

Objective: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry.

Design: This research centred on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries – blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries – into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants.

Results: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.

Conclusion: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.

 

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Plants Heal

February 13, 2018

Dear Friends

Plants heal. A plant based diet centered around vegetable, fruits, grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds is now being promoted by Kaiser Permanente (the largest of Americas health care providers), the WHO (The World Health Organization), and Harvard Medical School.
Noncommunicable diseases (chronic diseases) are on the rise. According to our Dr. Dohrea Bardell, statistics on “our aging population project” that 6 out of 10 people will live with 1 to 5 different chronic illnesses. But that is not all, chronic diseases also affect our younger (0-18) and working-age (from 18-64) populations.
Plant based diets (vegetarian and vegan) have shown in research to prevent and even reverse noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Cancer and additionally Arthritis, and Neurological Disorders. More on that will be published in the joint project with Dr. Judy Stevens-Long and Dr. Dohrea Bardell later this year.

The following four BioImmersion products provide the essence of what these dietary regimes must give your body to support your body attaining health in old age.

Garlic: 1 capsule each day. Garlic is shown to not only fight colds/flu but to support the body against a variety of cancers.
Cruciferous Sprouts– 2 capsules a day before bed to support the liver’s ability to detox (phase II detox). Cruciferous vegetables are touted as the best preventative foods against cancer.
Phyto Power– 1-2 capsules daily taken in the morning to provide the brain with the best food for better thinking, regeneration of nerves, and prevent aging brain. The potent polyphenols also protect against a variety of cancers (blueberries and rose hips), offer anti inflammatory properties, and liver support (dandelion).

Beta Gluten High Potency Synbiotic– one heaping tablespoon taken before breakfast or dinner. One of the most potent probiotic product with 65 billion strong probiotic organisms, and our famous beta glucans with red beet root to lower cholesterol and support liver function. The beta glucans also are shown to support  prevention of variety of cancers.

As you can see, we revere plants and their power to heal our bodies.

Cancer Support

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

 

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

Choosing a healthy diet: Research studies link the emerging global pattern of metabolic syndrome and weight gain to the prevalence of Westernized diet of daily meats, dairy, eggs, simple and processed carbohydrates, and too much sugar (Chai et al., 2017; Azadbakht & Esmaillzadeh, 2009; Lutsey et al., 2008). Although there are conflicting views on dietary guidelines, many scientists and health organizations agree that a focus on whole food plant-based diet is the healthiest guideline for metabolic syndrome and weight loss (Yokoyama et al., 2017; Satija et al., 2017; Kahleova et al., 2017; Hever et al., 2017; Turner et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016; Wang et al., 2015; Tilman & Clark, 2014; WHO/FAO, 2003).*

 

The Plates, Pyramids, Planet report, compiled in collaboration with the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN) at the University of Oxford, concludes that a plant-based diet has many advantages for health and the environment (UN Report, 2016).*

The type and nature of carbohydrates that improve our metabolic health (obesity, cardiovascular, and diabetes) are comprised of whole plants with fiber (Wright et al., 2017). Whereas low carbs diets with high fat content is shown to increase metabolic syndrome (Lamont et al., 2017; UN Report, 2016).*

A diet that is 80-90% whole food plant-based is highly recommeded by many health organizations and medical universities around the world.


 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens.

Such is the title of Puupponen‐Pimiä et al.’s (2005) research on berry phenolics.  The purpose of the their study was to determine the effects of berries and berry phenolics on selected pathogenic gastrointestinal bacteria and to identify single phenolic compounds possessing antimicrobial activity.

Phenolic’s antimicrobial activity has gained importance as phenolic berry extracts inhibit the growth of selected Gram-negative intestinal bacteria and are not active against Gram-positive beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria (Puupponen-Pimiä et al. 2001).

The study includes a selection of Scandanavian berries whose collective polyphenolic content is similiar to what is present in the offering in our High ORAC Synbiotic.

The outcome of the study showed that Staphlococcus, E coli, Salmonella were inhibited, while lactic acid bacteria such as L. rhamnosus was not effected.  This is particularly important because the increased incidence of antibiotic resistant strains of the above pathogens.  Staph. aureus, the most dangerous of drug resistant pathogens was well inhibited by this collection (Puupponen‐Pimiä, 2005).

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species.

Per capsule: A minimum of 25 billion CFU (Colony Forming Units) of probiotics and a high ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbent Capacity) score of 3000 from the berry phenolics.  The extracts include blueberry, bilberry and grape seed extracts along with other whole berries, quercetin and resveratrol.

High ORAC final 2

References

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends
HO Front Low Rez
Recent studies show that dietary polyphenols support the growth of good bacteria in the gut while inhibiting pathogenic bacteria.

Dueñas et al.’s (2015) study entitled, A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols, showed that dietary polyphenols contribute to the maintenance of intestinal health by preserving the gut microbial balance through the stimulation of beneficial bacteria (i.e., Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) and the inhibition of pathogenic bacteria, exerting prebiotic-like effects.

One of the many beneficial effects attributed to dietary polphenols is due to phenolic metabolites formed in the gastrointestinal tract through the interaction with good lactic acid bacteria. The outcome is the formation of more good bacteria and the inhibition of various pathogenic bacteria and yeast.

BioImmersion’s High ORAC Synbiotic powerfully mixes polyphenols with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. Per capsule: A minimum a 25 billion probiotics and a high ORAC score of 3000.


High ORAC final 2

References

  • Duda-Chodak, A., Tarko, T., Satora, P., & Sroka, P. (2015). Interaction of dietary compounds, especially polyphenols, with the intestinal microbiota: a review. European journal of nutrition54(3), 325-341. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-015-0852-y
  • Dueñas, M., Muñoz-González, I., Cueva, C., Jiménez-Girón, A., Sánchez-Patán, F., Santos-Buelga, C., … & Bartolomé, B. (2015). A survey of modulation of gut microbiota by dietary polyphenols. BioMed research international2015. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2015/850902/
  • Gupta, A., Dwivedi, M., Mahdi, A. A., Gowda, G. N., Khetrapal, C. L., & Bhandari, M. (2012). Inhibition of adherence of multi-drug resistant E. coli by proanthocyanidin. Urological research, 40(2), 143-150. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00240-011-0398-2
  • Heinonen, M. (2007). Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics–a Finnish perspective. Molecular nutrition & food research, 51(6), 684-691. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mnfr.200700006/full
  • Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s
  • Nohynek, L. J., Alakomi, H. L., Kähkönen, M. P., Heinonen, M., Helander, I. M., Oksman-Caldentey, K. M., & Puupponen-Pimiä, R. H. (2006). Berry phenolics: antimicrobial properties and mechanisms of action against severe human pathogens. Nutrition and cancer, 54(1), 18-32.
  • Puupponen‐Pimiä, R., Nohynek, L., Hartmann‐Schmidlin, S., Kähkönen, M., Heinonen, M., Määttä‐Riihinen, K., & Oksman‐Caldentey, K. M. (2005). Berry phenolics selectively inhibit the growth of intestinal pathogens. Journal of applied microbiology, 98(4), 991-1000.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02547.x/full

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3

The modulation of the gut microbiome composition by alteration of food habits has potentialities in health improvement or even disease prevention.

Polyphenols are extensively metabolized by gut bacteria into a complex series of end-products that support a significant effect on the functional ecology of symbiotic partners that can affect the host physiology.

Moco, S., Martin, F. P. J., & Rezzi, S. (2012). Metabolomics view on gut microbiome modulation by polyphenol-rich foods. Journal of proteome research, 11(10), 4781-4790. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300581s.

 

©2005 – 2018 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved