Dear Friends,

Can you name this Beautiful Creature?

Dohrea is a voracious reader. A book to her is like a cool drink of spring water on a hot day. Last night as I looked through her latest pile of new books to be read, I picked up one called Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder, and read the endorsements:

A page turning novel as well as an exploration of the great philosophical concepts of Western thought, Sophie’s World, with more than 30 million copies in print, has fired the imaginations of readers all over the world.

So I began reading the first chapter: fourteen year old Sophie goes to the mail and opens a mysterious letter addressed to her that asks the question, Who are you? This will initiate a journey of self- discovery through studying the history of Western philosophy.

In 1968, I had just returned to the U.S. from two years of living in Micronesia, to a teaching job in a New York City high school. I was in The Big Apple and going through re-entry culture shock. I came across The Book by Alan Watts, with a subtitle, On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are. This book, along with another, The Three Pillars of Zen by Roshi Philip Kapleau, challenged me to ask the proverbial, Who am I question. I embarked on a ten year journey into Zen Buddhism.

One of the traditions in Zen is the Zen koan: the Zen Master gives the student a single question to meditate on—i.e. the classic koan: What is the sound of one hand clapping. I studied under a couple of Roshis (Zen Masters), lived in several Zen monasteries and meditated on my breathing and my own personal koan: How do I realize Buddha while looking at a tree?

I lived at the Maui Zen Center in Makawao, Hawaii with Roshi Robert Aiken, his wife Anne and a number of young sanyasins (students). Roshi Aiken had been a University of Hawaii professor, was a Buddhist scholar, writer and poet. One of his Haiku poems that I’ve quoted before—in the July 30th, 2009 Forward Thinking–goes like this,

Watching gardeners label their plants I vow, with all my being, to practice the old horticulture and let the plants identify me.

Two week ago we talked about ecological redundancy and going organic totally. Last week we discussed the food cycle and trophic levels. This week I want to ask you a question. Your koan is: What makes a food therapeutic?

Next week let’s share our thought?

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

BioImmersion.com

Clinical Note:

My morning Therapeutic Foods routine—one tablespoon of Beta Glucan Synbiotic Formula, one teaspoon of the No. 7 Systemic Booster, four capsules of the Cruciferous Sprout Complex and one capsule of the Wild Blueberry Daily. Mix the Beta Glucan and the No. 7 is a big glass of water and swig the rest down. It tastes good as is but you can add fresh or frozen berries, fresh drinking coconut water, or make a smoothie of your choice. Try it for a couple of months and see how you body feels.

The Last Quiz Answer:

Warthogs live in groups called sounders. Females live in sounders with their young and with other females. Females tend to stay in their natal groups while males leave but stay within the home range. They are the only pig species that has adapted to grazing and savanna habitats. Their diet is omnivorous, composed of grasses, roots, berries and other fruits, bark, fungi, eggs and carrion. A warthog is identifiable by the two pairs of tusks protruding from the mouth, which are used as weapons against predators. The lower pair becomes razor sharp by rubbing against the upper pair every time the mouth is opened and closed. They range is size on the upper end to 5 feet in length and 170 lbs. in weight.



The International Living Building Institute has a dandelion for its logo. The metaphor of the flower, rooted in place, and yet harvests all energy plus water, is adapted to climate and site, operates pollution free, is comprised of integrative systems … is their vision for the buildings of the future. It is awesome—they are practicing the ancient horticulture. See this very important video.