Year: 2017

Anti-carcinogenic Support

October 9, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                 Phyto Power High Rez 2

Phyto Power is formulated with several species of blueberry, rosehip, and dandelion, shown in research to support DNA and cellular integrity, suppressing or interfering with oncogenic transformation, bolstering antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses, and contributing significantly to nerve re-generation.

Blueberries, rose hip, and dandelion are showing great potential in research on many different cancers, such as gastrointestinal tract (Bishayee et al., 2016), breast (Jeyabalan et al., 2014; Adams et al., 2010; Ries-Filho, 2008), brain (Cagle et al., 2012), breast and prostate (Sigsted et al., 2008), skin cancers (Chatterjee et al., 1011; Aggarwal et al., 2004), colon (Jiménez et al., 2016), and more.

Plant phenols have been researched for many years.  Johnson et al. (1994) found plants and their biologically active constituents contribute protective and anti-carcinogenic effects (see Table 1, p. 193).

More recently, Zhan et al. (2016) found that blueberries effect the migration, invasion, proliferation and cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Li et al. (2009), Seeram, (2008), and Serram et al. (2006) have researched different berries for many years to discover their effect on a variety of cancer cells. Yang & Li (2015) have shown that dandelion extract protects human skin fibroblast from UVB damage, while Sigstedt et al. (2008) studies dandelion leaves, flower and roots and their anti-carcinogenic effect on breast and prostate cancers. Rosehip is found to have antiproliferative and anti-oxidant effect (Jiménez et al., 2016), as well as reduce brain tumor proliferation and apoptosis (Cagle, 2012).

Phyto Power utilizes several varieties and the whole plants of blueberries, rosehips, and dandelions. Grown in remote regions of Alaska, these plants and berries are more powerful with high actives due to the pure, harsh and challenging environment of Alaska (Grace et al., 2014; Youself et al., 2013; Dinstel et al., 2013).

Phyto Power is a wildcrafted wonder! Take 1-2 capsules a day.

References

  • Adams, L.S., Phung, S. Yee, N., Sheeram, N.P., Li, L., & Chen, S. (2010).Blueberry phytochemicals inhibit growth and metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Cancer Res, 70(9), 3594-605.DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-3565
  • Aggarwal, B. B., Bhardwaj, A., Aggarwal, R. S., Seeram, N. P., Shishodia, S., & Takada, Y. (2004). Role of resveratrol in prevention and therapy of cancer: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer research, 24(5A), 2783-2840.
  • Bishayee, A., Haskell, Y., Do, C., Siveen, K.S., Mohandas, N., Sethi, & G., Stoner, G.D. (2016). Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10), 1753-75. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2014.982243
  • Cagle, P., Idassi, O., Carpenter, J., Minor, R., Goktepe, I., & Martin, P. (2012). Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) extracts on human brain tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 3(5), 13. . DOI:10.4236/jct.2012.35069
  • Chatterjee, S.J., Ovadje, P. Mousa, M., Hamm, C., & Pandey, S. (2011). The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 129045.DOI: 10.1155/2011/129045
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188
  • Grace, M.H., Esposito D., Dunlap K.L., & Lila M.A. (2014). Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild Alaskan and commercial Vaccinium berries. J Agric Food Chem, 62(18), 4007-17. doi:10.1021/jf403810y . Johnson, I.T., Williamson, G., & Musk, S.R.R. (1994). Anticarcinogenic factors in plant foods: A new class of nutrients?Nutr Res Rev,7, 175–204. DOI: 10.1079/NRR19940011
  • Jeyabalan, J., Aqil, F., Munagala, R., Annamalai, L., Vadhanam, M.V., Gupta, R.C. (2014). Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.J. Agric. Food Chem, 62, 3963-3971. DOI: 10.1021/jf403734j
  • Li, L., Adams, L.S., Chen, S., Killan, C., Ahmed, A., & Seeram, N.P. (2009). Eugenia jambolana Lam. [purple berries] berry extract inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer but not non-tumorigenic breast cells. J Agric Food Chem, 57(3), 826-31. DOI: 10.1021/jf803407q
  • Seeram N.P. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5. DOI: 10.1021/jf072504n
  • Seeram, N.P., Adam, L.S., Zhang, Y., Lee, R., Sand, D., Scheuller, H.S., & Heber, D. (2006). Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. J Agric Food Chem, 54 (25), 9329-39.DOI: 10.1021/jf061750g
  • Sigstedt, S.C., Hooten, C.J., Callewaert, M.C., Jenkins, A.R., Romero, A.E., Pullin, M.J…. Steelant, W.F. (2008). Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 32(5), 1085-90. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.32.5.1085
  • Yang, Y., & Li, S. (2015). Dandelion extracts protect human skin fibroblasts from UVB damage and cellular senescence. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 619560. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/619560
  • Yousef, G.G., Brown, A.F., Funakoshi, Y., Mbeunkui, F., Grace, M.H., Ballington, J.R., Loraine, A., & Lila, M.A. (2013). Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). J Agric Food Chem, 61(20), 4806-15. DOI: 10.1021/jf400823s
  • Zhan, W., Liao, X., Yu, L., Tian, T., Liu, X, Liu, J., … Yang, Q. (2016). Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.Biomed Rep, 5(5), 579-584. DOI: 10.3892/br.2016.774

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Alaskan berries are known for their phenolic power:

Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health, 72. DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188

In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and heart disease – conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska’s wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases.

Objective: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry.

Design: This research centred on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries – blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries – into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants.

Results: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.

Conclusion: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.

 

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Nerve Regeneration

October 6, 2017

Dear Friends

By 2029, more than 20 precent of the total U.S. population will be over the age of 65 (US Census, 2012). By 2050, 30% of the total population in the U.S. will be over 65 years of age. As our aging population expands we see more age-related health disorders, which means we must find measures to prevent or even reverse age-related health disorders (Joseph et al., 2009).

Research has recently shown that consumption of berry fruit, and in particular blueberry, can dramatically impact the aging brain, possibly leading to improved cognition and motor abilities (Joseph et al., 2009).

As you can see both of my above citings come from James Joseph who was for several decades the lead scientist and lab chief for the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.

It was Dr. Joseph’s research and that of his colleagues who demonstrated that blueberries and blueberry extract reverse and prevent brain aging (Shukitt-Hale et al., 2008; 2007), improve memory and motor skills (Carey et al., 2014; Malin et al., 2011; Brewer et al., 2010), repair neuronal tissue and function (Joseph et al., 2003; Miller et al., 2012), and serve as a potent anti-aging food (Joseph et al., 1999; 2009; Shukitt-Hale et al., 2015; 2012).
Blueberry Extract
Our Blueberry Extract was designed with Dr. Joseph’s help.  He helped me to convert his work to human consumption.  It is the most powerful blueberry extract on the market, our 100% North American blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) provides a comprehensive profile of anthocyanins.

Suggest dose is one capsule a day or as directed by your physician.

References:

  • Brewer, G.J., Torricelli, J.R., Lindsey, A.L., Kunz, E.Z., Neuman, A., Fisher, D.R., & Joseph, J.A. (2010). Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract. J Nutr Biochem, 21, 991-998. DOI: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2009.08.005
  • Carey, A.N., Gomes, S.M., & Shukitt-Hale, B. (2014). Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet. J Agric Food Chem, 62, 3972-3978. DOI: 10.1021/jf404565s
  • Joseph, J., Cole, G., Head, E., Ingram, D. (2009). Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. J. Neurosci. 29(41), 12795–12801. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-09.2009
  • Joseph, J.A., Denisova, N.A., Arendash, G., Gordon, M., Diamond, D., Shukitt-Hale, B., Morgan, D. (2003). Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutr Neurosci, 6 (3), 153-162. DOI:
  • Malin, D.H., Lee, D.R., Goyarzum P., Chang, Y.H., Ennis, L.J., Beckett, E., Shukitt-Hale, B., Joseph, J.A. (2011). Short-term blueberry-enriched diet prevents and reverses object recognition memory loss in aging rats. Nutrition, 27, 338-342. DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2010.05.001
  • Shukitt-Hale, B., Lau, F.C., Joseph, J.A. (2008). Berry fruit supplementation and the aging brain. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 56, 636–641. DOI10.1021/jf072505f

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Note:  We are gradually changing all our labels as you can see if you click here on the Supernatant and High ORAC Synbiotics links.  The new label for the Blueberry Extract will have a subtitle and read: Blueberry Extract- Cognitive and Nerve Regeneration. 
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

What works for sepsis?

September 27, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                   SN Front Low Rez copy

Severe sepsis is a common, expensive, and frequently fatal condition, with as many deaths annually as those from acute myocardial infarction. It is especially common in the elderly and is likely to increase substantially as the U.S. population ages (Angus et al., 2001).

The health benefits of probiotics and synbiotics are well established in healthy adults, but what of their role in preventing postoperative sepsis?  This is the question that Arumugam, Lau, and Chamberlain sought an answer for in their 2016 meta-analysis which assessed the impact of probiotics and synbiotics on the incidence of postoperative sepsis in gastrointestinal surgical patients.

As the title of their study indicates— “Probiotics and synbiotics decrease postoperative sepsis in elective gastrointestinal surgical patients:  a meta-analysis” — their answer is affirmative.

A comprehensive literature search of all published randomized control trials (RCTs) was conducted with 15 RCTs meeting their selecting criteria in which 1201 patients were involved (192 receiving probiotics, 413 receiving synbiotics, and 596 receiving placebo) and analyzed.

Overall, probiotics and synbiotic uses significantly reduced the risk of developing postoperative sepsis by 38%.  Their conclusion was that probiotic/synbiotic supplementation is a valuable adjunct in the care of patients undergoing GI surgery.

The Supernatant Synbiotic contains:  15.75 billion cfu/cap of certified strains of Traditional Bulgarian pedigreed probiotics. They are B. longum, L. casei, L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus (multi-strain) and S. thermophilus (multi-strain) along with Supernatant (inactive probiotic cell populations of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus and their metabolites) plus inulin (derived from organic chicory root fiber).

Suggested supplementation: 1-2 capsules daily.
LactORN LRez jpeg 3
The LactORN contains:  the probiotic Lactobacillus casei grown in a way to retain its natural oligoribonucleotides (ORNs). Plus it contains the prebiotic inulin derived from organic chicory root.  Think of it as your immune boosting tool. Across animal species, the LactORN has been shown to support immune system competencies to prevent infections caused by viruses and bacteria. It also helps the body to protect itself from toxins.  Plus it helps to keep the adaptive immune system from overreacting into septic shock (Marshall, 2007).

Suggested supplementation: 1 level tsp per week (dissolve in mouth).

References:

  • Angus, D. C., Linde-Zwirble, W. T., Lidicker, J., Clermont, G., Carcillo, J., & Pinsky, M. R. (2001). Epidemiology of severe sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care. Critical care medicine, 29(7), 1303-1310.
  • Arumugam, S., Lau, C. S., & Chamberlain, R. S. (2016). Probiotics and synbiotics decrease postoperative sepsis in elective gastrointestinal surgical patients: a meta-analysis. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 20(6), 1123-1131.
  • Marshall W. (2007). Oligoribonucleotides alert the immune system of animals to the imminence of microbial infections. US patent 7,189,834 B2

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dear Friends

Original copy
The Original Synbiotic is a daily probiotic for the whole family.

The Original probiotics are researched pedigreed strains of lactic acid bacteria that support the development of a healthy GI tract microbiome.

A healthy gut microbiome is dependent on strong and proven probiotics, such as the Original strains. The Original Synbiotic provides a powerful symbiotic combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Streptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 19258), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 8014), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and Bifidobacterium longum (ATCC 15707).

Our chosen probiotics are foundational ATCC strains shown in research to work together with human cells to perform many functions in the body. For example, these probiotic strains help the digestive system, support and balance the immune system, and enhance our nervous system by producing neurotransmitters. They reinforce the GI barrier function to protect us from xenobiotics and pathogens, even binding heavy metals. Moreover, they neutralize carcinogens such as those caused by heterocyclic amines found in blackened meat and elements such as nitrosamines in sausage. By acidifying the epithelial membrane, they enable the absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium more readily. And lastly, our chosen strains also support the important task of daily regularity (Syngia et al., 2016; Hardy et al., 2013; Figueroa‐González et al., 2011; Ng et al., 2009).

The Original Synbiotic suggested daily dose: one tsp daily.

Of the many beneficial functions needed to be performed by our probiotic friends, colonizing the GI tract membrane and thereby protecting from our body from pathogens and xenobiotics, is very important. Check out these studies on colonization (Toscano et al., 2017; Underwood et al., 2015; Panigrahi et al., 2008; De Champs et al., 2003; Sarem- Damerdji et al., 1995).

See the Original Synbiotic Monograph.

References:

  • De Champs, C., Maroncle, N., Balestrino, Damien., Rich, C., Forestier, C. (2003). Persistence of Colonization of Intestinal Mucosa by A Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus casei subsp rhamnosus Lcr35, after Oran Consumption. J Com Microbiol; 41(3): 1270-1273.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC150315/
  • Figueroa‐González, I., Quijano, G., Ramírez, G., & Cruz‐Guerrero, A. (2011). Probiotics and prebiotics—perspectives and challenges. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 91(8), 1341-1348.
  • Hardy, H., Harris, J., Lyon, E., Beal, J., & Foey, A. D. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics and immunomodulation of gut mucosal defences: homeostasis and immunopathology. Nutrients, 5(6), 1869-1912.
  • Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases, 15(2), 300-310.
  • Panigrahi, P., Pradhan, L., Mohapatra, S.S., Misra, P.R., Johnson, J.A., Chaudhry, R., Taylor, S., Hanse, N.I., Gewolb, I.H. (2008). Long-term colonization of a Lactobacillus plantarum synbiotic preparation in the neonatal gut. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 47(1):45-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607268
  • Sarem-Damerdji, L., Sarem, F., Marchal, L., Micolas, J.P. (1995). In vitro colonization ability of human colon mucosa by exogenous Lactobacillus strains. FEMS Microbiology Letters; 131(2):133-137. https://academic.oup.com/femsle/article-abstract/131/2/133/524865/In-vitro-colonization-ability-of-human-colon?redirectedFrom=PDF
  • Syngai, G. G., Gopi, R., Bharali, R., Dey, S., Lakshmanan, G. A., & Ahmed, G. (2016). Probiotics-the versatile functional food ingredients. Journal of food science and technology, 53(2), 921-933. doi:  10.1007/s13197-015-2011-0
  • Toscano, M., De Grandi, R., Stronati, L., De Vecchi, E., & Drago, L. (2017). Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the healthy gut microbiota composition at phyla and species level: A preliminary study. World journal of gastroenterology, 23(15), 2696.
  • Underwood, M. A., German, J. B., Lebrilla, C. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut. Pediatric research, 77, 229.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350908/

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3In today’s world the level of assault on our bodies from pollution, pathogens, and stress is so high that we need powerful food supplements.  Our bodies, after all, know exactly what and how to utilize food for therapeutic purposes.

At BioImmersion, we created the Therapeutic Food Supplement line with a new medical framework in mind: the power and intelligence of food. Our Therapeutic Foods are indeed potent food supplements that behave intelligenly in the body – repairing, healing, protecting and preventing.

 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved

Weight-Less

September 22, 2017

Dear Friends                                                                                                                                                      WL Low Cropped Jpeg

Recent research has shown the link between chronic hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and weight gain. Hyperglycemia puts our body into a state of oxidative stress, which leads to many pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases (Domingueti et al., 2016).

Ingredients of Weight-Less per capsule

  • 7-Keto DHEA- 25mg (helps to burn fat)
  • 2 Brown Seaweed extracts- 200mg (help to lower and prevent high blood sugar levels, offers a strong anti-inflammatory, and supports weight loss)

Take 1 – 2 capsules of Weight-less one-half hour before meals, especially important before your carbohydrate (or meat) laden meals.* (See Green Facts on meat and diabetes)

Food Science

The ingredients in Weight-less have been shown to reduce both the states of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. The Kelp and Bladderwrack polyphenol extracts (phlorotannins) offer organic-certified bioactive ingredients that (1) act on amylase and glucosidase enzymes to optimize post-meal blood glucose and insulin responses and (2) demonstrate that they have a high total antioxidant activity as verified by the Total ORAC 6.0 assay.

The phenols in the kelp and bladderwrack have superior antioxidant activity – a neutralizing effect – on the primary free radical superoxide anion. Superoxide  anion is known as the “mother of  free radicals” because  it also can become a hydroxyl ROS, a nitrogen RNS and a hydrogen peroxide ROS.

Thus, Weight-Less helps prevent post-meal hyperglycemia and has a direct scavenging action on excess free radical generation.  The key is not to totally neutralize all free radical activity but to bring about a healthy redox homeostasis.

References:

  • Domingueti, C. P., Dusse, L. M. S. A., das Graças Carvalho, M., de Sousa, L. P., Gomes, K. B., & Fernandes, A. P. (2016). Diabetes mellitus: The linkage between oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and vascular complications. Journal of diabetes and its complications, 30(4), 738-745.
  • Hulsmans, M., & Holvoet, P. (2010). The vicious circle between oxidative stress and inflammation in atherosclerosis. Journal of cellular and molecular medicine, 14(1‐2), 70-78.
  • InterAct Consortium. (2013). Association between dietary meat consumption and incident type 2 diabetes: the EPIC-InterAct study. Diabetologia, 56(1), 47-59
  • Gutowski, M., & Kowalczyk, S. (2013). A study of free radical chemistry: their role and pathophysiological significance. Acta Biochimica Polonica, 60(1), 1-16.
  • Valko, M., Rhodes, C., Moncol, J., Izakovic, M. M., & Mazur, M. (2006). Free radicals, metals and antioxidants in oxidative stress-induced cancer. Chemico-biological interactions, 160(1), 1-40.

Sincerely yours,

Seann

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3High meat intake is also shown in research to generate oxidatative stress and hyperglacemia. We will discuss this in another email but meanwhile, see Dr. Greger’s informative video on Why is meat a risk factor for diabetes?
 

©2005 – 2017 BioImmersion Inc. All Rights Reserved