Year: 2016

Colds, Flus, and Chlorella

September 15, 2016

Dear Friends

How does our new Organic Chlorella help combat flus and colds?

Research studies, such as Yamauchi et al. (2011; 2012), and Otsuki et al. (2012), find Chlorella enhances SIgA levels in the mucus membranes.

Chlorella also enhances the blood levels of Natural Killer cells (Kwak et al, 2012; Davis et al., 2010). And is shown effective by Azocar J, Diaz A. (2013) in the treatment of chronic Hepatitis C viral infections.

Therapeutic Food Protocol to support protection from colds and flus:

Let’s discuss the science behind this amazing green plant:

Our body’s mucous membranes are vulnerable “Ports of Entry” for pathogens entering into our body.  Approximately, 95% of all infections are initiated at the mucosal surfaces: nose, throat, GI tract, urinary tract and lungs (Walsh, 2011).

Our immune system’s job is to protect us from these assaults; its natural antibodies like secretory IgA (SIgA) are amongst its frontline armament.  Healthy SIgA levels minimize the risk of “getting the bug”.  Excess stress can reduce SIgA levels, resulting in more colds and flus, including respiratory tract infections such as pheumonia and influenza (Klentrou, 2002).

Food Science:

Chlorella is an unicellular green algae which provides us with key nutrients, including a vast array of vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, all of the essential amino acids, nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), dietary fiber, and a wide range of antioxidants, bioactive substances and chlorophyll.  It is the number one selling food supplement in Japan, Korea and Taiwan.

Amongst its many valuable attributes it enhances our immune function, supports natural detoxification, supports cardiovascular health, helps balance the body’s pH, and is a vegan protein source.  In this Forward Thinking we are focusing on its immune system benefits.

Chlorella enhances SIgA levels in the mucous membranes throughout the body.

It is well understood that too strenuous exercise can cause a lowering of an individual’s secretory IgA levels and increase his/her risk of illness.  Epidemiolgoical studies suggest that highly trained athletes are more susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections compared with the general population (Yamauchi et al, 2011).

The focus of Yamauchi and associates study was to examine the relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and the appearance of upper respiratory symptoms (URS).  Their results demonstrated that the number of URS increased along with the EBV-DNA expression and decrease of SigA levels.

This decrease suggests that the athletes were at an increased risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection, and therefore, it could be necessary to take protective actions to minimize catching cold viruses or even activating endogenous viruses like EBV.

Reducing the training load would be one way to increase SIgA, but Otsuki et al. showed another way.  In previous research Otsuki demonstrated that chlorella intake daily increased the secretion rate of SIgA in humans.  In their later 2012 study they additionally demonstrated that those participants in a Kendo training camp who consumed chlorella daily attenuated the drop in SIgA, a reduction experienced by other participant who didn’t take the chlorella supplement.

Chlorella enhances the blood levels of Natural Killer Cells (NK cells).

NK cells are cytotoxic effectors of innate immunity that distinguish between healthy and malignant or virally-infected cells.  It is critical to have NK cells present optimal levels to protect the body from cancer and viral infections.

Kwak et al, (2012) demonstrated the beneficial effect of short-term [duration of study] Chlorella consumption on its enhancement of NK cell activity, and produced INF-y and IL-12 as well as IL-1beta—the Th-1 cell-induced cytokines.

Chlorella supplementation enhances clinical outcomes in patients with Hep. C.

It is estimated that up to 4 million persons in the US have chronic Hepatitis C virus infection (Davis et al., 2010).  After three month of chlorella supplementation, Hepatitis C patients reported as follows:  Quality of Life- 76.9% of the participants reported an improvement in their energy levels, 46.1 % reported an improvement in their perception of general health,   84.6 % of these patients had a significant decrease in their ALT levels (which is a marker for liver inflammation) from week 0 to week 12.  Evaluation of side effects showed that Chlorella was well tolerated by all participants.

These results add to the growing literature on the beneficial immunostimulatory effect of Chlorella supplementation.

Bibliography:

  • Azocar J, Diaz A. (2013). Efficacy and safety of Chlorella supplementation in adults with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. World J Garoenterol; 19(7): 1085-1090.
  • Davis et al. (2010).  Aging of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-Infected Persons in the United States: A Multiple Cohort Model of HCV Prevalence and Disease Progression. Gastroenteroloyg; 1(38): 513-521.
  • Klentrou et al. (2002). Effect of moderate exercise on salivary immunoglobiulin A and infection risk in humans. Eur J Appl Physiol; 87: 153-158.
  • Kwak et al. (2012). Beneficial immunostimulatory effect of short-term Chlorella supplementation: enhancement of Natural Killer cell activity and early inflammatory response (Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial). Nutrition Journal; 11: 53.
  • Otsuki et al. (2012). Chlorella intake attenuataes reduced salivary SIgA secretion in kendo training camp particpants. Nutrition Journal; 11: 103
  • Walsh et al. (2011). Part one:  Immune function and exercise. Exerc Immunol Rev; 17: 6-63
  • Yamauchi et al. Virus Activation and Immune Function During Intense Training in Rugby Football Players. (2011). Int J Sports; 32: 393-398

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Where Trump and Clinton Stand on Food: A Special Report from John Robbins:  We spend more on healthcare than any country in the world, yet we have the highest rate of cancer, diabetes and heart disease of any country in the world.  The above video gives us real pause for thought.

Meat and Colorectal Cancer

September 8, 2016

Dear Friends

The two most lethal cancers are lung and colorectal cancer, respectively.  Both are clearly associated with what we consume on a regular basis (Alberg, 2003; Cummings, 1979).
Approximately 750,000 Americans die each year from lung cancer. Yet 90% would have reduced the risk of getting cancer if they simply stopped smoking.

Colorectal cancer is linked to what we eat. In particular, eating too much meat has proven to increase our risk for developing colorectal cancer (Stephen, 2007; Stephen, 1999).

Meat, eggs, and dairy –  animal based protein –  has the potential to become a carcinogen in our body (see Food Science below).

An alternative, plant based Therapeutic Food protocol, replaces animal based protein with plant protein, nurtures the body with fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and more.

The Therapeutic Food Protocol for support against colorectal cancer:

The idea with these two products is to use them as a meal replacement multiple time a week.  As a breakfast drink you can add the above to a tall glass, add some fresh or frozen berries, some flax seed,  and add liquid- a 50/50 blend of water and organic pineapple juice.  And, it is replacing a meal where you normally had some meat and animal derived protein like bacon, sausage, ham, eggs.  The goal is to reduce these things.

And the Therapeutic Foods do so much more.

The Be Regular (on the shopping cart you’ll see the Energy Sustain) is organic chia, amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa and millet.  There is no gluten and it tastes great.  It has a good amount of plant based complete protein, vitamin, minerals, and essential oils.

The Beta Glucan Synbiotic provides pedigreed lactic acid bacteria.  They are fermenting bacteria, not putrefying bacteria and they put an inhibitory pressure on the growth of the putrefying strains.  The probiotics reduce and bind heterocyclic amines and nitrosamines – well established in research as extremely carcinogenic molecules. One hot dog has as many nitrosamines as five cigarettes.  They are found in unprocessed meat as well:  beef, chicken, and pork.   See Food Science below.

Food Science:

Reduction in the consumption of meat results in the reduction of the risk of colon cancer.

Stephen and fellow researchers (1999) looked a why African Americans get more colorectal cancer that Native Africans.  Colon cancer is extremely rare in Africans, while it’s 50 times higher in African Americans.  And, what’s interesting, it wasn’t because the Africans ate more fiber because their modern African diet is highly processed, low in fiber and yet there has been no dramatic increase in colon cancer.  The one big difference in their diets was that the diet of African Americans is rich in meat where as the native Africans diet is so low in meat and saturated fat.  Africans diet is more plant based with very little meat and saturated fat consumed weekly.  So much so that the Africans have a total cholesterol levels averaging 139, compared to over 200 in the US.

How does the extra meat eating cause cancer?

As observed by Cummings et al. (1979), the typical American diet has high level of animal protein intake, and because of that, up to 12 grams of protein per day can escape digestion and reach the colon where it is putrefyied by putrefying bacteria.  The byproduct of the putrefaction decomposition process is the production of, among other gases, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide gases which are cytotoxic.  Hydrogen sulfide impairs cytochrome oxidase, tissue metabolism, mucus formation, and DNA methylation

The difference between plant proteins and animal proteins reaching the colon is that the animal protein contain a lot of the sulfur containing amino acids like methionine, where plant protein doesn’t and hence very low hydrogen sulfide production.

This animal protein does more than just putrefy. It causes an increase in the cancer promoting growth hormone called IGF-1 (Levine, 2014).  Remove meat, egg whites, and dairy proteins from your diet, and our bloodstream can suppress cancer cell growth about eight time better because the blood levels of IFG-1 are greatly reduced (Ornish, 2005).

It is well established in medical science that heterocyclic amines (blackened meat derived carcinogens) and nitrosamines are potent carcinogens—one hotdog has as many nitrosamines and nitrosamides as five cigarettes.  The pedigreed bacterial species in the Beta Glucan Synbiotic have been shown to neutralize these carcinogenic molecules.

Bibliography:

  • Alberg AJ, Sarnet JM. (2003). Epidemiology of lung cancer. Chest Journal; 123(1_suppl): 21S-49S.
  • Cummings et al. (1979). The effect of meat protein and dietary fiber on colonic function and metabolism. Am J Clin Nutr; 32: 2094-2101.
  • Levine et al. (2014).  Low Protein Intake is Associated with a Major Reduction in IGF-1, Cancer, and overall mortality in the 65 and Younger gut not Older Population. Cell Metab; 19(3): 407-417.
  • Ornish et al. (2005). Intensive Lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. The Journal Of Urology; 175: 1055-1070.
  • Stephen et al. (1999). Rarity of Colon Cancer in Africans is associated with low animal product consumption, not fiber. AJG; 94: 1373-1380.
  • Stephen et al. (2007). Why do African Americans Get More Colon Cancer than Native Africans? American Society for Nutrition; 137(1): 175S-182S.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3Where Trump and Clinton Stand on Food: A Special Report from John Robbins
We spend more on healthcare than any country in the world, yet we have the highest rate of cancer, diabetes and heart disease of any country in the world.  The above video gives us pause for thought.

Dear Friends

The most frightening fact about Coronary Heart Disease is that for the majority of Americans the first heart attack is sudden and unfortunately deadly (Myerburg, 2012).

How do we prevent and treat coronary heart disease? With the right foods.

The Therapeutic Food Protocol:

Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic– 1 heaping tbl twice daily (or two tbl once daily).
Phyto Power– 1 capsules daily
Garlic– 1 capsule daily
Cruciferous Sprouts– 2 capsules daily (preferably between meals).

It is well established in research that soluble beta glucan fibers in the diet will help in the lowering of LDL cholesterol. Two tablespoons of the Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic supplies enough beta glucans to significantly lower LDLs, and therefore to place the American Heart Association Seal for cardiovascular health on the label.

The pedigreed strains of probiotic bacteria utilized in the Beta Glucan Synbiotic reduce endotoxin producing bacteria in the gut, as well as, facilitate the tightening of the gut membrane so that endotoxins will not leak into the systemic circulation. Endotoxins can cause chronic systemic inflammation, which then causes a stiffening of the arteries (Erridge, 2011).

Food Science: Let’s discuss cholesterol, endotoxemia, and coronary heart disease.

There is a wide body of evidence that shows places in the world where heart disease is rare, due to dietary habits.

In the famous China Study, researchers investigated the eating habits and incidence of chronic disease among hundreds of thousands of rural Chinese.  In the Guizhou province, a region with half a million people, not a single death could be attributed to coronary artery disease among men under 65 over the course of three years (Campbell et al., 1998).

In Uganda, a country of millions in East Africa, coronary heart disease was described as “almost non-existent (Shaper, 1959). The researchers found that out of 632 people autopsied in St. Louis, Missouri, 136 had died of heart attacks, compared to the East African cohort where out of 632 people autopsied in Uganda only 1 was from a heart attack.

The almost non-existent cases of heart disease among rural Chinese and Africans was attributed to their amazingly low levels of cholesterol, averaging under 150 mg/dL.  Their diets were both centered on plant-based foods, such as grains and vegetables (De Biase, 2007).

Dietary choices at any age may prevent, stop, and even reverse heart disease before it’s too late.

William C. Roberts, editor in chief of the American Journal of Cardiology, states that the only critical risk factor for atherosclerotic plaque buildup is cholesterol, specifically elevated LDL cholesterol in your blood.  It is called bad cholesterol because it’s the vehicle by which cholesterol is deposited into our arteries.  According to Roberts, the optimal LDL cholesterol level is probably 50 to 70 mg/dL.  The population target should therefore be around a total cholesterol level under 150 mg/dL  (Benjamin, 2013).

To drastically reduce LDL cholesterol levels, you need to drastically reduce your intake of three things:  trans fat, which comes from processed foods and naturally from meat and dairy; saturated fat, found mainly in animal products and junk foods; and to a lesser extent dietary cholesterol, found exclusively in animal derived foods, especially eggs (Trumbo, 2011).

Nathan Pritikin, Dean Ornish, and Caldwell Esselstyn, all pioneers in the plant based diet, separately, within their own research, took patients with advance heart disease, and put them on the kind of diet followed by the African and Asians population sited above, and their patients got better— as their LDL cholesterol levels dramatically decreased, so too did the plaque in their arteries, resulting in improved circulation to their heart (Esslestyn, 2010).

Endotoxemia:  A single fast food meal of sausage and egg McMuffins can stiffen your arteries within hours, and this reduced elasticity will last for around 5 hours.  Eating these kinds of meat and fat laden foods daily shifts the gut microflora toward endotoxic producing bacteria, and when these kind of bacteria (or their cell wall parts, such as LPSs) enter into circulation, our immune system reacts causing the stiffening of arteries (Vogel, 1997).  Cardiac patients can experience relief [from angina] when placed on a diet composed primarily of plant foods (Ornish, 1998).

Note: This week I focused on the Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic, and its relevance in lowering cholesterol and reducing endotoxemia.  In subsequent emails we will focus on the other three products.

Bibliography:

  • Benjamin MM., & Roberts. WC. (2013). Facts and principles learned at the 19th Annual Williamsburg Conference on Heart Disease. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent); 26(2): 124-36.
  • Campbell et al. (1998). Diet, lifestyle, and the etiology of coronary artery disease: the Cornell China Study. Am J Cardio; 82(108): 18T-21T.
  • De Biase et al. (2007). Vegetarian diet and cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Arq. Bras Cardiol; 88(1): 35-9.
  • Erridge, C. (2011). The capacity of foodstuffs to induce innate immune activation of human monocytes in vitro is dependent on food content of stimulants of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. Br J Nutr; 105(1): 15-23.
  • Esslestyn, C.B. (2010). Is the present therapy for coronary artery disease the radical mastectomy of the twenty-first century? Am J Cardiol; 106(6): 902-4.
  • Myerburg, R.J., & Junttila M.J. (2012). Sudden cardiac death cause by coronary heart disease. Circulation 28; 125 (8): 1043-52.
  • Ornish et al. (1998). Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal of coronary heart disease. JAMA; 280(23): 2001-7.
  • Shaper A.G., & Jones K.W. (1959). Serum-cholesterol, diet, and coronary heart disease in Africans, and Asians in Uganda. Int J Epidemiol; 41(5): 1221-5.
  • Trumbo, P.R., & Shimakawa T. (2011). Tolerable upper intake levels for trans fats, saturated fat, and cholesterol. Nutr Res; 69(5): 270-5.
  • Vogel et al. (1997). Effect of a single high-fat meal on endothelial function in healthy subjects. Am J Cardiol; 79(3): 350-4.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3The Food Revolution Network is committed to healthy, sustainable, humane and conscious food for all. The network aims to empower individuals, build community, and transform food systems to support healthy people and a healthy planet.

Dear Friends

The University of Hawaii Cancer Center assessed that nearly every person in Hawaii will face a diagnosis of cancer either personally or within their family at some point in their life, so says (Hawaii Cancer Facts & Figures, 2010).

The Center’s Mission is to create a world where cancer no longer exists.

Cancer is basically a non-communicable life style disease, and diet is a huge component.  How then can Therapeutic Food supplements help in the prevention cancer?


Therapeutic Foods are plant based supplements. Here is a protocol based on recent studies to support the prevention of cancer

Food Science

Epidemiological studies have consistently linked abundant consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduction of the risk of developing several types of cancer (Boivin et al., 2009).

Boivin et al., (2009) evaluated the inhibitory effects of extracts isolated from 34 vegetables on the proliferation of 8 different tumor cell lines: breast cancer, brain tumors, kidney cancer, lung cancer, childhood brain tumors, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and stomach cancer.

The best by far were vegetables from the Allium (particularly garlic) and the Cruciferous (particularly broccoli) families—inhibiting these cancers almost 100%. The researchers concluded, “The inclusion of cruciferous and allium vegetables in the diet is essential for effective dietary based cancer-preventative strategies.”

Berry fruits have beneficial effects against several types of human cancers; and the evidence is overwhelming.  Their benefits are as follows:

  • Counteract, reduce and repair damage from oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • Regulating carcinogen and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, transcription and growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, and cellular signaling pathways of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis.
  • Sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance.
  • Provide protection from therapy-associated toxicities.

These anticancer potential benefits are related to their polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, gallotannis, phenolic acids), stilbenoids, lignans and triterpennoids (Seeram NP., 2008).

It is well established that glucans enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer and anti-infection immunotherapy, both in clinical and experimental conditions (Vetvocia V., 2013).

Beta-glucans, naturally occurring polysaccharides, are present as constituents of cell wall of cereal grains, mushrooms, algae, or microbes including bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Since Pillemer et al. first prepared and investigated zymosan in the 1940s and others followed with the investigation in the 60s and 70s, researchers have well established the significant role of B-glucans on the immune system relative to cancer treament, infection, immunity, and restoration of damaged bone marrow (Yoon TJ., 2013).

The good news is that these plant based foods are shown in many studies to help in the prevention of cancer, and at the same time, help to prevent heart disease and diabetes.

Bibliography:

  • Basu A. Lyons TJ. (2012). Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in the metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives. J Agric Food Chem; 60: 5687-92.
  • Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
  • Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health;72 doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • Seeram NP. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5.
  • Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.
  • Vetvocla  V. (2013). Synthetic oligossacharides: clinical application in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Md Chem; 13(5): 720-4.
  • Yoon et al. 2013. The effects of B-glucans on cancer metastasis. Anticancer Agents Med Chem; 13(5): 699-708.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3VERGE Sep 19-22, 2016 Santa Clara, CA

VERGE Summits are invitation-only, half-day working sessions exploring pressing issues at the intersection of technology and sustainability for companies, governments, utilities and innovators.

Dear Friends

Emerging science supports therapeutic roles for berries to prevent and reduce metabolic syndrome.

Add any of our berry collection of supplements to decrease risk markers – to every meal that contains sugars of any kind, fat (from dairy, meat, or eggs; and even plant oils), and grains.

Metabolic syndrome is a pre-diabetic state characterized by several cardiovascular risk factors:  abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, raised blood pressure, insulin resistance, pro-inflammatory state and prothrombotic state.


Basu and Lyons in their 2012 research (Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives) stated that,

Interventional studies reported by our group and others have demonstrated the following effects: strawberries lowering total and LDL-cholesterol, but not triglycerides, and decreasing surrogate biomarkers of atherosclerosis (malondialdehyde and adhesion molecules); blueberries lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure and lipid oxidation and improving insulin resistance; and low-calorie cranberry juice selectively decreasing biomarkers of lipid oxidation (oxidized LDL) and inflammation (adhesion molecules) in metabolic syndrome.

Mechanistic studies further explain these observations as up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, reduction in renal oxidative damage, and inhibition of the activity of carbohydrate digestive enzymes or angiotensin-converting enzyme by these berries.

(See Food Science and Green Facts below for more on this important discussion).

Therapeutic Food protocol for support in reducing risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Food Science

Phyto Power supplies the phytonutrient power of multi-species of wild-crafted Alaskan blue berries and rosehips, and four species of dandelions picked in the wild.  This product is loaded with bioflavonoids (Dinstel, 2013).  Consuming 2 capsules of the Phyto Power is equivalent to eating 6 wild-crafted Alaskan rosehips (seeds and all), a small hand full (covering the palm of your hand) of wild-crafted blueberries, and one small cup of dandelion salad (from the wild meadows of Alaska) complete with flowers and roots.

No. 7 Systemic Booster not only supports you with powerful Bulgarian strains of probiotic bacteria, supernatant, and strategically selected nutriceuticals, but also provide the glycemic lowering power of whole organic cranberry, pomegranate, tart cherry and pineapple, all with high actives.

Food Science:

Throne et al. (2012) demonstrated the blunting effect on the insulin spike with high glycemic foods when you add whole berries.  They showed graphically what white bread does to our insulin levels within 2 hours after eating it.  Adding black currents and lingenberries when eating the same amount of white bread and there’s less of an insulin spike, even though by eating the berries you’ve added additional sugar (fructose) to the meal.  How do we account for this?

The soluble fibers in the berries has a gelling effect in our intestines that slows the release of sugars.  As viscosity increases, the glycemic load goes down.  Additionally, fruit phytonutrients inhibit the transportation of sugars through the intestinal wall into our blood stream (Madero, 2011).

Bibliography:

  • Basu A. Lyons TJ. (2012). Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in the metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives. J Agric Food Chem; 60: 5687-92.
  • Dinstel R.R., Cascio J., & Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska’s wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health;72 doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
  • Lustig, RH. (2013).  Fructose: It’s “Alcohol Without the Buzz”.  Adv Nutr; 4: 226-235.
  • Madero et al. (2011). The effect of two energy-restricted diets, a low-fructose diet versus a moderate natural fructose diet, on weight loss and metabolic syndrome parameters: a randomized controlled trial.  Metabolism, Clinical and Experimental; 60: 1551-1559.
  • Petta et al. (2013). Industrial, not fruit fructose intake is associated with the severity of liver fibrosis in genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients. Journal of Hepatology; 59: 1169-1176.
  • Throne et al. (2012). Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women. Am J Clin Nutr; 96: 527-33.

Sincerely yours,

Seann Bardell

We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

Green Facts:

Globe_Home 3If the fructose in sugar and high fructose corn syrup has been considered alcohol without the buzz in terms of the potential to inflict liver damage, what about the source of natural fructose, fruit?  See Dr. Michael Greger’s informative Video:   If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?